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Copper patinas


#1

Hi Guys:

I know this subject has been pretty well worked over, but my son has
written me for advice about the copper bands he is having done for
his posts on either side of the gates to the driveway. What is the
quickest way to create or cause some verdigris on the copper. He has
other copper trim on his house which has been there for some time
and it has verdigris on it and he wants this new copper to match
that old as quickly as possible.

Is there any particular patina that will create this look rather
quickly? And what should he use?

thanks heaps for your help - I did go out on Orchid and look in the
archives - unfortunately everything there was for small pieces of
jewelry that could be put into a solution hot or put in a closed
container so the fumes would work their magic, but…these bands
will be permanent on the gate posts and either side of the drive, so
can’t do that.

Now I imagine he could apply some solution in a hot condition, but
can’t do much else except paint on patinas that would maybe work
their chemical magic.

If no one knows how to do this for outdoor and permanently secured
pieces of copper, I do understand. This is a bit outside our range
of activities. But if someone out there is an expert with copper,
maybe there is something that can be done.

Otherwise, I’m sure if he just leaves it alone, it will EVENTUALLY
match or blend with the rest.

Thanks heaps.
Kay


#2
What is the quickest way to create or cause some verdigris on the
copper. 

Ammonia, vinegar and salt.

Bury in media, such as saw dust, cob meal, bird seed, etc., or set
up a fuming situation.

I have some sample images on my blog in a recent post.

Elaine
CreativeTextureTools.com


#3
If no one knows how to do this for outdoor and permanently secured
pieces of copper, I do understand. This is a bit outside our range
of activities. But if someone out there is an expert with copper,
maybe there is something that can be done. 

I am not an expert with outside copper, I like to patina mine, but
not with the green. I think it would look best in the long run to let
it do its own thing, and help it a bit by spraying it with salt water
once in a while. Sea water maybe if he can get it. Someone else may
have a better solution, but personally, I like to let metal do what
it wants. I think it looks better. He could also spray vinegar and
salt water on it, and cover with plastic wrap, and let it set a few
days. Maybe test on some copper that is not part of the fence.

Roxy


#4

There are good commercial products out there. I would try a test
piece with vinegar, bleach, and salt. It will turn the copper green
and you can see if the color works for you.


#5

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ec has what you need.

Judy Hoch


#6

Hi everyone: Just want to thank Elaine Luther, Roxy, Daniel Conlin
and Jamie King for their input re copper patinas. I have forwarded
all your messages on to my son so this comes to say thanks for taking
the time to respond. I do appreciate it and I know my son does.

Kay Vontz


#7

Here is something I found about green patina for copper when I
googled “remove firescale from brass”…I know to keep it from
happening to use Roach Kill, I would rather not use poison.

Posted by: sidecar_jon on May 18, 2009 at 12:26 AMI make copper
bowls and “fire scale” is a big problem as they need annealing
between bashings. I usually use vinegar and salt solution, just left
to soak then a stiff wire brush (or pan scourers, though not steel
bristles as they go rusty almost immediately)It comes right off
leaving dull reddish raw copper which can then be polished with
"normal" copper polish. To get a pleasing green patina i use a cheap
liquid plant food, painted on it goes very green very quickly.
Putting in a plastic bag and fuming it with ammonia also works bit is
slow.

Hope this helps a bit,.
Roxy


#8

I use a simple solution of vinegar, water and salt. it’s non-toxic
and of all the natural formula’s that I have tried it works the
quickest. You can soak a cloth in the mixture and wrap it around the
piece and just let it sit. Because this is the safest way to patina
you only need a little ventilation.

Aviron Jewelry


#9

Roxy - sound most interesting - will any liquid plant food work? or
is it a particular kind one needs. And the big question, is the
green permanent - because the copper bands are outside on the big
gate posts to the drive. Although I suppose you could repeat this
application from time to time. You can contact me off line if you
wish at @bericho2. Thanks.

Kay


#10
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ec has what you need. 

Just received a few of the patinas and they do gorgeous things with
metal! You can look forward to creating beautiful finishes. Barbara at
the end of a sunny day spent on the tractor. ANd now sun-tired.


#11

Kay,

What happens to copper based patinas varies with alloy and weather
conditions. Putting the variability of different cooper alloys and
"their" patinas, the weather conditions in the area where the item
is can have great influences on many patinas. In general, the sulfate
(green) and even more so on the nitrate (blue) patinas, the applied
patina “should” stay as applied if the area is dry and far from salt
water. If near ocean influences or high humidity and also a good
deal of “industrial/city combustion by products” acid materials in
the atmosphere can have great effects on the patinas. Depending on
what is “in” the atmosphere, the patina may or may not stay as is,
continue to develop or change over time if it is not sealed (wax,
lacquer or some other clear coat). There are many clear coats, each
with it’s good and bad points - ease of application, longevity, ease
of renewal, physical “look”, etc. Also with some situations, no
clear coat is used but there are “aspects” of this choice. One can
also use the “oxide colors” of actual patinas as a paint/coloring on
the metal surface but these are more similar to actual sort of
"painting/coloring" the item. Again there are pluses and negatives
of using this sort of material. The Young’s and staff at Sculpt
Nouveau are great folks and can help with decisions as to what you
might do/use, but it ma come down to you and maybe your client having
to make some decisions to get what you/they want. Most folks have no
idea as to what to expect a patina “should/might” look like so you
have some leeway but but I know you want to give your client as
good/great a job as is possible. If you have any other thoughts or
questions about this and want to call me, please feel free to do so.
I would highly recommend that you give a call to Sculpt Nouveau and
talk with someone there about this, they may give you some other
ideas/possibilities.

Good luck.
johl dach
http://MLCE.net


#12

Thanks John for your input - everyone on Orchid has been so kind to
offer their suggestions and each and every suggestion I have
forwarded to my son for his use.

This just comes to say thanks to all of the Orchid members who have
offered their suggestions (and I hope I have answered each of you
personally) and if I’ve neglected to write and say thank you to
anyone, please forgive me - it was not intentional.

Orchid is just such a great community and in the years I’ve been a
member I’ve learned so very much and everyone has been so incredibly
helpful. Without you I’d not have made such good progress with most
things. Your experience and input has been so valuable to me.

So once again, thanks for your help. All good advice.

Kay Vontz
in not so sunny Florida where we are finally getting some good rains,
much needed.


#13

Hi, I would also be interested in this please. Thanx and
keep shining, D


#14

There are good commercial products out there. I would try a test
piece with vinegar, bleach, and salt. It will turn the copper green
and you can see if the color works for you.


#15

Thanks Cathe: I had heard of vinegar and salt, but adding bleach to
it is a new twist for me. Will definitely give this a try.

Kay


#16

I had heard of vinegar and salt, but adding bleach to it is a new
twist for me. Will definitely give this a try.

Well as a chemist, I can tell you to avoid ANY acid with bleach, as
it will release chlorine gas. Be very carful with bleqach when you
mix it.