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Copper Patina


#1

A short while back people were discussing how to protect delicate
copper patina. Well I have just experimented with using acrylic
Futura floor wax. I think it works great, and has the added benefit
of being easily removed without damaging the underlying patina. You
can remove it with methyl hydrate. I would like it a little less
shiny.

I hope this helps.
RRuff


#2
    A short while back people were discussing how to protect
delicate copper patina. Well I have just experimented with using
acrylic Futura floor wax. I think it works great, and has the added
benefit of being easily removed without damaging the underlying
patina. You can remove it with methyl hydrate. I would like it a
little less shiny.

Maybe going over it lightly with 0000 steel wool would remove some
of the shine.

Dolores


#3
A short while back people were discussing how to protect delicate
copper patina. Well I have just experimented with using acrylic
Futura floor wax. I think it works great, and has the added benefit
of being easily removed without damaging the underlying patina. You
can remove it with methyl hydrate. I would like it a little less
shiny. 

I also experimented with various waxes, including floor wax and
Renaissance Wax, and only had a 50% success rate. The heat-induced or
drawn color needs to be deep into the surface if you want to rub wax
onto it. I had one piece’s color just disappear, while others just
diminished with wax. The satin krylon clear is what I now use for a
variety of reasons: it helps protect from light scratching, protects
clothing from icky wax or warm skin from melting the wax (I found
that if women wear the copper pieces next to their skin, you REALLY
need a finish, and not wax); and in 90% of the pieces it intensifies
the color so it almost looks like a watercolor.

Roseann


#4

Future floor finnish is more a clear acrylic coating than a wax. The
manufacture suggests removing it with ammonia. Well we know what
ammonia does to copper. Instead, like I mentioned, I use methyl
hydrate. I doesn’t seem to disturb delicate patinas.

RRuff


#5

OK, here is a little from my experience:

Of the spray clear coats in cans that are out there these two are
recommended - Incralac and Permalac. Real coatings made specifically
for this purpose. Sherwin Williams also has a two part spray that is
excellent. I’ll see if I can get that name.

Now, products like this two part and high quality laquers require
some effort. A spray booth, compressor and airbrush for sure. The
key is the very fine spray provided by the air brush. Purchase a
quart of the absolute best clear laquer you can find. Spend the
money! This is important. Prepare a bunch of pieces for finishing.
Suspend them from fine wire in the spray booth. Then cut the lacquer
you will need in half with fresh thinner. It will look like water.
Apply it with the air brush in very thin coats. The idea is to just
mist the piece and let it dry. Then mist again. The water thin
laquer will be absorbed by the oxide, not just coat it. That will
seal it. How many coats? Two or three at least. Suit yourself.

Keep your air brush and spray booth absolutely immaculately clean.
The first time a glob squirts out or dust is kicked up by the
compressed air you will regret any skimping.

Another choice is powder coating. This I only know a little about,
but, it is a choice. There are very clear powder coats available.
They can be applied thin. They are baked on and harder then heck. It
can be done at home with a toaster oven or you can find a local
powder coater for help.

Good luck, Bill

Reactive Metals Studio, Inc.
PO Box 890 * Clarkdale, AZ 86324
Ph-928/634-3434 * Ph-800/876-3434 * Fax-928/634-6734
E-mail- @Michele_Deborah_Bill
Catalog- www.reactivemetals.com