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Comfort Fit?


#1

Hi Folks, I’ve got a request to do a ring in the “comfort fit” style.
I’ve seen this in catalogs, but not sure exactly what it entails.
Does it just mean that the interior edge is rounded off, or is there
something more to it that I need to take into account for this
project? Is it also squared off somewhat, or a non-round hole?

Thanks in advance,
Dave
Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio and
Carolina Artisans’ Gallery
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com


#2

Dave, I’ve seen references to a “comfort fit” in knotted rings, and
it’s my impression they mean that the inside of the ring is smooth,
with rounded edges, as you surmise. Knotted rings have a definite
"feel" to them, and not everyone likes that aspect.

Loren
http://www.golden-knots.com/


#3

Hi Dave, I carve comfort fits quite often for men and women both.
Picture the cross section like a football shape where the inside is
actually domed as well as the outside (rather than just the edges
rounded off from a flat surface). A typical thickness is 2 mm, after
you get the shape of the shank squared up and tapered if needed,
then mark the sides with .5 mm around from the inside and mark 1 mm
from the outside. Shape the inside so it rounds down from the
middle to the .5 mm mark, carving evenly all around then work the
outside, rounding down to the 1 mm mark. Depending on the look, you
can leave a nice flat .5 mm side area or gently round it out as
desired.

have fun, Marta


#4
   Hi Folks, I've got a request to do a ring in the "comfort fit"
style. I've seen this in catalogs, but not sure exactly what it
entails. Does it just mean that the interior edge is rounded off,
or is there something more to it that I need to take into account
for this project? Is it also squared off somewhat, or a non-round
hole? 

Dave, the classic “comfort fit band is a normal heavy weight
round-hole style band, but the inside surface, instead of being
cylindrical, is a gentle half round shape, or to put it another way,
the inside edges of the band have been estremely rounded off, so the
"rounding off” curve from one edge blends into that of the other
edge. On wider bands, a little of the middle might be left flat, but
blended into the curved/rounded over edges. The main key in
working with these is to remember that unlike a flat band, which
contacts a ring mandrel at it’s leading edge, and is therefore
measured in size at that edge contact point, comfort fit bands
contact a ring mandrel pretty much at their centerline. It’s this
contact point that determines the effective ring size, so it will
appear to slide a little further up the mandrel than a standard flat
inside surfaced band will. However, this is offset a little by the
fact that the band is then somewhat heavier than a standard band, so
may need to fit very slightly tighter for securty, plus the fact that
the comfort fit means that to the finger , in terms of fit, the band
will fit like a somewhat narrower flat band, which may also suggest a
slightly tighter size. In all, this often balances out so that for a
size (x) band, you’d still have the comfort fit band slide up to the
(s) marking on the mandrel just to it’s leading edge. But it’s
important to actually try this on the customer. Some will want it a
tad bigger, to the actual measured ring size, along the center of the
band.

I’m tired. It’s late. I can’t tell if I garbled all that. does it
make sense?

cheers
Peter


#5
    Hi Folks, I've got a request to do a ring in the "comfort fit"
style. 

Dave, Yes you are correct about the inside edges being curved, or
rounded for comfort. Usually I make gents rings thicker, which
allows a more dramatic taper on the edges,making the inside shank
really curve in an arc(cutaway view). Guys generally don’t like to
wear rings, especially wedding rings!(grin). So making them this way
makes for a more comfortable…‘longer wearing’ ring. I also will
"soft square" any ring (ladies or gents) that have a setting on top,
to keep it more upright, and keep from spinning on finger…guess
I’ve been doing these for 25 years now…most people like!
Hint…comfort fit BEFORE soft squaring. Soft square mandrals
available at most fine stores!(more grins)


#6

Hi Dave, In my experience a true “comfort fit” is not simply a
heavily beveled inside edge, but a low domed, half round profile on
the inside of the band. Imagine a low domed, half round ring turned
inside out so that the half domed surface is on the inside and you
have a “comfort fit”. The inside is still completely round, it just
minimizes the amount of metal to skin contact. I hope this helps!

Best regards,
John


#7
 Hi Folks, I've got a request to do a ring in the "comfort fit"
style. I've seen this in catalogs, but not sure exactly what it
entails. Does it just mean that the interior edge is rounded off,
or is there something more to it that I need to take into account
for this project? Is it also squared off somewhat, or a non-round
hole? 

Hey Dave, You got it… just break the sharp inside edge of the
shank you’re working on with a file, then sand and polish it. That’s
it! The more you round the inside edge, the better it feels. This
can be done on a round or squared interior shank. If I’m making a
ring with a comfort-fit shank, I’ll construct it a bit heavier than
normal, so that when I remove that edge, it doesn’t make the shank
too thin.

Hope it works out for ya! It suuuure is more comfortable to wear 'em
that way. :wink: Jeff Regan Regan Jewelry Cape Cod Mass


#8

Dave, A comfort fit band is a trademarked style. I think they have
several different styles but basically it is just a band that has a
rounded inside edge. They aren’t squared off. There is nothing
that says that you can’t square it off or make it other than round.
But if your customer has specifically requested it then they
probably just want the basic round shape. The bands are normally a
little heavier than the plain styles to allow for a significant
enough rounding of the inside edge to give that smooth feel.

Larry


#9

Hey Dave; comfort fit rings are exactly that… The inside of the
band is 1/2 round (as if you made the ring inside out) but the
outside can be a domed band, stove pipe(straight wall) or deigned. I
don’t do the flat inside on bands anymore because the comfort fit is
best. The only drawback is that it makes the ring a little heavier,
though not too much. It is a consideration though when you quote the
price to bump it about 10% more than usual. Stuller 800-877-7777
sells them in two or three weights.

Good luck,
Cynthia


#10

Hey Dave, Comfort Fit is actually a brand of wedding bands if I
remember correctly. I think the term is “inside round” since the
name Comfort Fit is taken.

There are many ways to do it. Some are half-round interior, some
are simply rounded on the outermost inside edge, or anywhere
inbetween. I make all my rings with an inside round, and to me the
most practical and comfortable is something in between. I round the
edges, such that it is smooth and comfortable to slip over the
knuckle, but most of the ring is still in normal contact with the
finger as opposed to just the center with a half-round interior.
Some rings will dig into the finger at the inside edge, so this is a
nice way to avoid that. Also many are not actually rounded on the
inside, but more like a slightly-smooth-edged facet that goes all
the way around the inside of the ring. This is a good looking way
to do it on a more geometric ring.

There are several ways to achieve the inside round… I prefer to
use a file in the wax, then a rotary file or rotary sandpaper in the
flexshaft to get the final shape after the ring is cast.

David Tomich


#11

Hi All, especially Dave to-day! As to the matter of the ring
requested as ‘comfort fit’ you have on order, it has to be exactly
done as the first answer you gave yourself, that is, the interior
edge of the shank is rounded off, fish-back, so that it slides in
the finger smoothly, no more no less. It has come to a custom lately
that wedding bands are ordered in this style of ‘comfort fit’, mind
you they are very comfortable to fit in as the title entails.

Hope that helps and best regards,
JOSEPH TANTI
MALTA
http://jostanti.cjb.net


#12
I'm tired.  It's late.  I can't tell if I garbled all that.  does
it make sense? 

Yes, it does, Peter! Thanks, all, for your input. Does raise a
question though. This is a “remote” client, and I haven’t met him. He
has specified a size 12 ring. Based on previous experiences, I have
learned to measure the finger myself, regardless of what size the
customer insists they need.

A customer at a recent show ordered a custom sterling silver ring in
size 4 1/2. She shipped it back a week after arrival, wanting it
resized to meet the size of one of those ring sizer guards that she
had installed by a local jeweler. She really needed a size 3!!! I
should have measured when she was in front of me!

It sounds to me, from your description, that fitting is more
critical with this design than with a more conventional band. Would
you say that is the case? I’ll be forging and fabricating this band,
then filing the “comfort fit” shape… best to get it right the first
time! Maybe I should have him do the fitting with a strip of paper
around the finger he can send me.

Thinking aloud…

Dave
Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio and
Carolina Artisans’ Gallery
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com


#13
  Hi Folks, I've got a request to do a ring in the "comfort fit"
style. I've seen this in catalogs, but not sure exactly what it
entails 

Dear Dave, If you look at the palm surface of your hand, you will
note that the fingers “come” off the palm on a curved arc. My
understanding is that a comfort fit would have the bottom of the
shank duplicate that curve on the palm side of the shank. I’ve made
only one like that myself. At least I think that is what is meant.

HTH Joe Dule


#14
   It sounds to me, from your description, that fitting is more
critical with this design than with a more conventional band.
Would you say that is the case? I'll be forging and fabricating
this = band, then filing the "comfort fit" shape... best to get it
right the = first time! Maybe I should have him do the fitting with
a strip of paper around the finger he can send me. 

fitting is no more critical than with other rings of equal width and
weight. But it’s just done a little differently. You have to
remember where the ring is actually having it’s inner circumfrence
measured on the mandrel, that’s all. You could try the paper, but
I’ve never found that accurate. Best is to have him send you a ring
that fits correctly, or you send him, on loan, a proper set of metal
ring sizing bands in the appropriate width.

Peter Rowe


#15

Dear Dave, I don’t take credit for the following info. My wonderful
master teacher, a young man originally from Thailand that has been
doing jewelry since age 7, passed on the info to me and it works
great! I have used large-scale low-dome half-round (what a
sentence) and smaller scale low-dome wires. When you make the ring,
turn it dome side in. The result is a very comfortable ring with a
flat outside surface. It can be round, sqaurish, or whatever you
wish. The solder seam needs to be slightly beveled inward to get a
good seam. Purchased from Hoover & Strong, Inc.: 8X2mm half-round
for the wider band.

Good luck.
Kay Taylor