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Coloring silver to monstrosity orange


#1

Hi all, I’m having a hard time with my new design. I’m making a
pendant which is really just a giant bezel with metal loops to attach
a chain and 2 drops. I constructed it out of copper with fine
silver bezel wire. I want to make the WHOLE DARN THING ORANGE! I
tried Ceramitation. All I can say is YUCK! What a sloppy mess. Now
I’ve moved on to enameling, but I’m not sure if this will work on a 3
dimensional piece including my small metal loops. Anyone ever tried
it? I’m about ready to buy a can of rustoleum and drench the damn
thing. I don’t want to go that route, but I can’t think of another
way. So folks, how would you turn this metal monstrosity orange?
Thanks, A. Derenthal


#2
    So folks, how would you turn this metal monstrosity orange? 

Try this link below. It may be just what you need to accomplish the
effect you want for your project.

http://www.sculptnouveau.com/dyes.html


#3

Do we have any Chemists heRe: I believe that silver permanganate is
orange in color. I think that it has to be produced
electrolytically. My inorganic chemistry is a bit rusty and help
would be appreciated. What is probably necessary is a variable
voltage supply, an electrolyte bath and some metal for the other
electrode.

Charles Friedman DDS
Atlanta


#4

spray powder coating in commercial factory is best way Nic. B


#5

Hi, Morticia-

See if you can get hold of a copy of Coloring, Bronzing and
Patination of Metals
. I think that this is your best bet. I get the
impression that you are looking for a bright, bold, "in your face"
orange color. I don’t know how to achieve that on copper, but I do
have a copper mirror frame in mottled tones of orange and gold. The
artist told me that she achieved this by spattering the copper with
liver of sulphur and then heating it with a torch. If that would
work for you, it may be worth trying. If you don’t like the result,
you can throw the piece in the pickle pot and it will be back to
copper color in no time.

Lee Einer,
Dos Manos Jewelry
http://www.dosmanosjewelry.com


#6

How about metal dye? I know some have used it sucessfully
http://www.sculptnouveau.com/dyes.html

Stephanie


#7

Recently someone here mentioned a site which sells metal dyes and
patinas. I haven’t tried them yet, but it seems a good place to look.

http://www.sculptnouveau.com/dyes.html

Janet Kofoed


#8

Hello Charles-

According to Lange’s Handbook of Chemistry, 12th Edition, page 4-107
and Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 82nd Edition, p. 4-83, silver
permanganate (CAS Reg. No. 7783-98-4) is violet to dark violet
monoclinic crystals, solubility in water of 0.9 grams per 100 grams
of water and decomposing in 95 percent ethanol. It doesn’t look
like it would be inert enough to be useful on jewelry. Since you
are a DDS, I know you have had sufficient chemistry to be aware of
the explosive hazards of permanganates. I blew up a burette right
next to the Professor in a quantitative analytical lab one time. I
was trying to clean the thing with a conc. sulfuric acid/potassium
permanganate solution when the classical sodium dichromate/ sulfuric
acid mixture was not effective. The thing went off with a heck of a
loud bang and totally shattered the burette. Fortunately, no one
was hurt or sprayed with acid. I was holding the burette down in a
deep soapstone sink.

Captain Blood
"Marlinespike Seamanship in Precious Metals"
@Alden_Glenda_Blood


#9

The Colouring, Bronzing and Patination of Metals by Hughes and
Rowe-ISBN 0-8230-0762-b has the you need to get the
orange color you want.

Tom Nesbitt
Handwrought Jewelry by Nesbitt
@Tom_Nesbitt

[Edited: Hanuman, Add Amzon URL]


#10

Sculpt Nouveau metal dyes are not durable unless you protect with a
coat of lacquer or varnish. Dolores


#11

Y’know, sometimes having (mild) dyslexia can add fun and excitement
to one’s reading. Captain Blood’s recent post offered a great
example:

I blew up a burette right next to the Professor in a quantitative
analytical lab one time. 

I, of course, read it the first couple of times as “I blew up a
brunette right next to the Professor…” Couldn’t for the life of
me figure out why someone would be so blase about blowing someone up.

Sigh. Lab safety is definitely important.

Karen Goeller
@Karen_Goeller


Handcrafted and Unique Artisan Jewelry


#12
So folks, how would you turn this metal monstrosity orange? Thanks,
A. Derenthal 

For extreme orange, use Prisma colored pencil then lacquer it.

Marta in Sacramento