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Coin ring how it was made


#1

I recently saw a coin ring that has me baffled as to how it was
made. I wasn’t made by hammering the edges and flattening. Somehow
the patterns on the coin ended up on both the outside and inside of
the ring.

Does anyone know how this is done. I can find plenty of videos on
the net describing the edge hammering technique.

“M”


#2

Suppose you could cut a hole in the coin, to make it into a washer
then hammer it onto a ring mandrel… just a thought, and I’ve never
done it. I saw something like that in a Rio Grande video.

Regards Charles A.


#3
Does anyone know how this is done. I can find plenty of videos on
the net describing the edge hammering technique. 

It’s done by cutting a hole in the coin, turning it into a washer.
Then it’s hammered around a mandrel to form a ring.

http://members.shaw.ca/john_edmonton/HowtomakeaCoinRings[2].pdf
http://www.spiritualflyer.com/Sales.html#anchor_105

Kathy Johnson
Feathered Gems Jewelry
www.featheredgems.com


#4

Mark, Try here:

http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=283073.0

Mark Bingham
Fourth Axis


#5
Does anyone know how this is done. I can find plenty of videos on
the net describing the edge hammering technique. 

Difficult to say without a picture. But be careful of “edge hammering
techniques”. I know it looks easy, but looks are misleading. There
are many variations of the technique, and each one must be used in
very specific situations.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#6

Easy - Peasy! Go to this link where Jess shows you how to make that
coin ring:

Tutorial: Turn a Quarter Into a Ring
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mikLcJmK54 

I’ve made a bunch of 'em and it isn’t quite THAT easy but the right
equipment helps.

John
Indiana


#7

Lots of videos on how it’s done on youtube.

Rgds…Ski & Cathy


#8

Punch the center out of the coin to make a washer then hammer the
washer over a mandrel into a ring shape. I saw a video on
Riogrande’s webpage showing this using a Pepe hole punch. I’ve been
meaning to try it but my “hole punch” will take an hour to set up
then be able to make 8000 washers an hour.

Jon Daniels
The Ring Lord Chainmail
http://theringlord.com


#9

They probably cut a hole in it to make it into a washer. Then forged
it on a mandrel. Here’s a video from Rio Grande that might give you
a betteridea of what I mean.

Michelle


#10
I've been meaning to try it but my "hole punch" will take an hour
to set up then be able to make 8000 washers an hour. 

You don’t need a punch. Find the center of the coin, scribe a circle
the desired size with dividers (make it smaller than the desired end
right size, as this hole will be stretched in the forming stage),
drill a small pilot hole, and simply saw it out with a jewelers saw.
Slight wobbles in the perfection of the saw cut will go away as you
form the ring, so long as the hole is reasonably well centered and
round. Don’t forget to anneal the coin before you start trying to
form it.

Peter Rowe


#11

I saw these a while back and decided to give it a try. I posted how
I did it on my website in the form of a little tutorial with photos
of the process and what went wrong… LOL. You can read it here if
you like.

http://www.frogsongstudio.com/coinringtut.html


#12
Lots of videos on how it's done on youtube. 

Somebody asked me about making a coin ring long ago, and I looked it
up and tried it without much success - don’t remember it anymore,
really. But I’m not writing about what I don’t remember - as I
recall, most of them are made by whacking on a coin with a spoon
until it becomes a ring. It’s avery old method, and it comes from
the depression era (if not before then), when people wanted to make
things without any resources to speak of. Like much folk art, it has
a long tradition…


#13
as I recall, most of them are made by whacking on a coin with a
spoon until it becomes a ring. It's avery old method, and it comes
from the depression era (if not before then) 

Interesting. I heard the same method described, but the time and
place differed. I was told that this method became popular on the
troop ships heading out to the Pacific war during WW2, while the
soldiers had nothing much to do before getting there. That account
was offered at a small private museum which had an interesting
collection of various “art” objects made primarily by U.S. soldiers
during that war, from the various found materials around them.
Things like intricate models of a DC-3 aircraft (or the military
version, who’s number I forget) made entirely from shell casings and
similar parts. Jewelry from shell casings and other bits of scrap
metal, as well as some of the interesting objects made FOR the
soldiers by the people already there… In that exhibit were a number
of those coin rings, all made from quarters, including a couple
partially finished ones, and an obviously beat up steel spoon that
the exhibit claimed had been the tool used on one of the partially
finished ones… I have no idea, of course, if this is all true. Even
worse, my aging brain cells can’t seem to remember exactly just where
this neat little exhibit was. One of the cities in which a SNAG
conference was held over the last few years, but I can’t remember
which…

It occurs to me to mention, as well, that all these rings were made
from the old coin silver quarters. I would rather expect that these,
once annealed, would be easier to make a ring out of than the modern
sandwich metal used in U.S. quarters.

cheers
Peter Rowe


#14

Wacking a silver quarter with a spoon does work. I made one when
about 13 years of age (like the youth the ring is long lost) Lots of
tedium with the spoon, hardest part was cutting out the finger hole

jeffD
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modelling & Goldsmithing
http://www.gmavt.net/~jdemand


#15

Here’s yet another one:

Elaine


#16
Here's yet another one:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-a-silver-ring-for-25-cents 

FWIW, I looked this up a bunch of years ago, so my memory may be
wrong, but I am under the impression that the original way to do this
was to hammer a large nail through the center of the coin and into a
solid wooden part (maybe the spot where the sailor had to stand
watch?) The nail was left sticking out, say, an inch. The coin was
tapped while rotating it on the nail.

Before long, of course, the ring would have a large enough hole to
come off the nail and be put back when there was time to work on it.
The advantages are that the sailor didn’t need a drill or a dremel or
even to waste any silver. The nail would be working on the inside
whenever the spoon was working on the outside. Much more efficient,
too, because the nail (being fixed in a very solid object like a
mast) would not waste energy the way tapping a hand-held object
would.

To my mind, this is a much more satisfactory method than drilling,
which leaves a rough, ugly hole and wastes metal. So even if they
didn’t do it that way, I would!

Noel