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Cleanup after stone setting


#1

Donna, I totally agree with what your German mentor taught you about
redundant work. It is a waste of time a break in momentum and an easy
way to give a piece that over worked look. However, I feel I must
mention a few exceptions to this rule. Any gold piece that requires a
time consuming setting process such as bead setting, extensive
channel work or a piece that has an expensive heat sensitive stone
such as tanzanite, emerald etc. should be prepolished. There is
nothing more frustrating to me than getting to the final polish and
finding irreversible porosity in a piece that I have spent hours
setting or uncovering a large pit that cannot be filled due to an
expensive channle or bezel set colored stone . This can often force
the entire piece to be redone. Also, on cast platinum pieces there
can be large voids just under the surface. If one of these voids are
uncovered (and the often are) the only quality way for a jeweler who
does not have access to a laser welder to fix these is to fuse new
platinum into the void. Even diamond can not take the heat required
to perform this procedure. In all the stated circumstances it would
be much more efficient to discover a problem before setting when
repairs can be done with far less impact on the final product.

John Sholl
J.F.Sholl Fine Jewelry
Littleton, Co


#2
    Donna, I totally agree with what your German mentor taught you
about redundant work. It is a waste of time a break in momentum and
an easy way to give a piece that over worked look. However, I feel I
must mention a few exceptions to this rule. 

John, I agree with you completely. When using castings, I make sure
it is pit free and will polish perfectly before I set any stones.

In the case of the fusing discussion, we’re talking about milled
stock that is pitfree to begin with. Therefore, I know I won’t
encounter pits. Besides, by the time I’ve blanked out the ring I have
a pretty good idea if I’ll encounter any problems. Also, I know my
weld is good because I’ve already hammered the ring up a size. If the
weld were going to fail, I’d get a warning. If someone is willing to
pay for it, I offer to do the milled, fused, hammered wedding band
instead of the cast one.

Hope this finally clears up the issue. I was specifically talking
about fabricated work and not castings.

Donna Shimazu