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Cleaning rollers of rolling mill


#1

Hello everyone. I am enjoying Orchid very much. I need
some advice, now. I recently purchased a rolling mill which arrived
covered with a lot of heavy grease. What is the best method for
cleaning the rollers? Thank you.

Sharon Sawyer, @Sharon_D_Sawyer


#2

Wear Rubber gloves and a mask Spray with Brake Parts Cleaner (Auto
Parts Store) let it soak a while like 5 to 10 minutes and wipe it
clean then spray with WD40 (also Auto Parts Store).

Who ever sold you the mill did not do a good job and I would check
the mill thoroughly as many a times the heavy grease just covers up
defects. We inspect all our mills and we need to remove the grease
and also check all the bolts and parts.

Kenneth Singh (Karat Rolling Mills).


#3

Wipe the grease off with a piece of clean rag. Don’t remove all of
it. It is there to prevent the highly polished rollers from rusting
and marking your sheet and wire as it rolls through.

You should reapply a little oil or grease every now and then.

Tony Konrath
Gold and Stone
www.goldandstone.com


#4

First, I would remove as much of the bulk grease as possible with a
soft cloth or paper towels. Then, I’d remove the remaining grease with
a cloth moistened with Charcoal Lighter Fluid. It is practically
odorless and is a good solvent for grease. Finally, wipe it dry with
clean paper towels. Before you put it up for the night, give it a
light spray with WD-40 or similar product to protect it against rust.
Regards. …Bob Williams


#5
        Wear Rubber gloves and a mask Spray with Brake Parts
Cleaner (Auto Parts Store) let it soak a while like 5 to 10 minutes
and wipe it clean then spray with WD40 (also Auto Parts Store). Who
ever sold you the mill did not do a good job and I would check the
mill thoroughly as many a times the heavy grease just covers up
defects. We inspect all our mills and we need to remove the grease
and also check all the bolts and parts. 

Keneth, Is there another lubricant besides WD-40 to use on my mills?I
dislike the smell of it and don’t care to have the oder in my stores
or studio. J Morley Coyote Ridge Studio


#6

Any light machine oil (such as 3&1 oil) will do to lubricate the
rollers. You don’t need much to do the job. A rolling mill I once
ordered had to be returned, because the rollers had not been greased
before packing, and they were all corroded when I opened the
carton.

Dee


#7

Hi Gang, I continually have to deal with rust prevention, removal,
etc., since my studio is not climate controlled, and I’m in the
relatively humid southeastern U.S. I have yet to develop a perfect
solution… it is a constant, and often losing battle.

One suggestion I’ve used, but not seen mentioned in this thread, is
recommended by Jeff Herman, of the Society of American Silversmiths
(www. silversmithing.com). He recommends using Renaissance Wax or
Butcher’s Wax (both brand names), which are high grade wax polishes
often used for furniture, bowling alleys, etc. A couple light coats
of wax will seal out the air and moisture without the gummy/oily mess
you get with WD-40 or 3-in-1 oil.

I was able to find the wax in the floor cleaning and finishing
section of a better hardware store. Not the kind of stuff you’ll find
in a jewelry or tools catalog. May be worth a try!

All the best,
Dave
Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio and
Carolina Artisans’ Gallery
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com


#8

Heavy grease or light grease is excellent to protect the rollers for
storage or shipping etc. Most of the time Cleaning rollers stem
from Rust or Rust preventives (other than grease). There are a
number of Rolling Mills manufacturers that apply a hard crusty
varnish/shellac like covering & in some cases heavy motor oil that
has caked in grooves and the edges of the rollers that are difficult
to get to.

I have tried almost every cleaning agent from Ammonia, Oven cleaners
to Carburetor Gum Outs. !!! Please do not try these !!!.
After many attempts I found that the Brake Parts Cleaner solves the
problem. It fits the job perfectly it removes any caked in dirt,
rust and all oily substance. This should be able to handle most of
the problem out there. After using the Brake Parts cleaner some
protection is needed WD-40 is recommended but ideally I would use
the sewing machine oil on the rollers. Recently I read on Orchid
ofcourse a piece about Wax which I will try out.

Thanks to Sara, David and J Morely
Kenneth Singh (KARAT )