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Cleaning Jeweler's Hands


#1
This lurker apologizes for beating a dead horse but for health and
practical purposes I thought I'd mention baking soda. It is
something we ought to have near our pickle pots to neutralize
potential acid spills and I would think a good practice to clean
hands/forearms with anyway to avoid acid burns from un-realized
contact. 

I have been delighted and amazed at what my simple question on hand
cleaning has wrought, metamorphosing from hand cleaning ( I love
this baking soda reply) through the feminist arguments (you rock,
Women!!) I don’t think we women have to prove anything with beat up
and dirty hands. When we enter and get into art shows our work speaks
for us. Thanks for a delightful bunch of replies. I’ll see if I can
think up another deceptively simple question sometime soon.

Linda Gebert
http://homepage.mac.com/lgebertsilverjewelry


#2
When we enter and get into art shows our work speaks for us. 

If only!!

If you mean an exhibit, well, I guess it has to speak for us. But at
a “fair”, I truly believe that our (my) appearance, demeanor,
articulation (and I mean ability to talk, not to bend at the joints)
and display all have worlds to do with whether things sell.
Especially in the case of work which is one off, not-for-everyone,
unusual stuff.

I envy those painters and sculptors who are sitting in shaded chairs
off to the side, letting people just browse and decide for
themselves. I’m taking pieces out of the case, talking about
technique and design, placing it on the customer’s
neck/arm/whatever, telling my little stories about each object, even
explaining how to wear/fasten it.

It has been quoted back to me that I commented before on this
forum-- Who’s going to buy their style from someone who doesn’t have
any?

Noel