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Cleaning a Stainless Steel Watchband


#1

I am wondering how can I clean a mens stainless steel link watch
band that has gotten dirty, without hurting the watch.

Thanks for any suggestions.

Elizabeth


#2
    I am wondering how can I clean a mens stainless steel link
watch band that has gotten dirty, without hurting the watch. 

Remove the stainless steel bracelet from the watch case by
compressing the spring bar, or by drifting out the pin. Clean the
bracelet in the ultrasonic (or by hand). Reassemble.

James S. Duncan, G.G.
James in SoFl


#3

Hello, Elizabeth,

I believe you are trying to clean this watch band without detaching
it from the watch head, there really is no good way of cleaning gunk
out from in between the links of a stainless steel band unless you
take it off. First detach the watch head and you can ultrasonic, and
then steam clean the band. Usually the bands are attached with
spring pins, it is quite easier to use a specialized tool to get to
these pins but you may find an alternative.

Good luck,
Dan Yokota


#4

Good question-it would be preferable to remove the band,soak it in
an ultrasonic for awhile(perhaps 30 minutes),and steam clean… I’ve
done this many times-even on Rolex…If you can’t remove the
band-lay it down on a wash cloth, scrub with a soapy solution using
an old toothbrush and then- Carefully rinse the band while holding
onto the casehead…In this instance you can’t steam unless the
watch is water resistance…If you should see condensation under the
crystal you’ll have to have the watch opened so that it can dry out.
Watch movements don’t like moisture. Oh,yes, make sure that before
you start the stem & crown are tight on the casehead(watch
case)…Good luck!!!

Sincerely,
Jo-Ann Maggiora Donivan, San Francisco, CA


#5

There is nothing so bilious and disgusting as a long worn expansive
watch band ! I simply won’t deal with them and I point out to the
customer that considering the fact that these bands lose their
tension after a period of time that it is time to replace it. After
all, nothing lasts forever, including bench people who expose
themselves to concentrations of bacteria! You have to draw the line
somewhere…


#6

I have made a considerable amount of money cleaning watch cases and
bands. I charge $20 and get an average of 6 pieces a week, sometimes
more, sometimes less. They each take about 5 minutes of my time to
take the stem out, drop the movement out, put it in the ultrasonic,
towel dry, and let set overnight for complete drying, and reassembly
the next morning. I make more profit on this than by selling most
new Speidel replacement bands. I suggest it with a few battery
replacements each day, and make an extra $100 plus each week for
very little effort. Add that to 30 or so battery sales a day , and
suggest a few back gaskets here and there, and you have a simple and
profitable week going and that doesnt include the masses of jewelry
repair and remount jobs that come my way daily.

Ed in Kokomo


#7
   There is nothing so bilious and disgusting as a long worn
expansive watch band ! I simply won't deal with them and I point
out to the customer that considering the fact that these bands lose
their tension after a period of time that it is time to replace it. 

I totally agree. I usually look at the person with the nasty band,
offer a replacement Speidel and if they insist on me working on the
watch anyway I simply point out that I have to hug my kid with these
hands. That usually seals the deal or gets them to leave. By the
way-- putting steam on these things when there is still dirt in them
launches all kinds of nasty bacteria into the air. If you’re going to
do that, you might as well throw away your respirator and mix
investment for casting with out protection either. And don’t worry
about wearing that seatbelt on the way in to work either… :slight_smile:

-Stanley


#8

I’ve been cleaning disgusting watchbands for years! I use an old
plastic peanut butter jar with a lid, some simple green, ammonia,
and water. Throw the jar in the ultrasonic, and repeat as needed. I
use the cheap disposable nitrile gloves if the band is really gross
(Oh, I remove the watch first). I charge for this service, there is
more profit than the sale of a new band, and my customers that are
sentemental over a nasty old stretch band appreciate the
transformation. They also remember me when they need diamond
earrings for their Granddaughter.

Lawrence


#9

When I am cleaning the expandable watch bands, I remove them from
the watch and link the ends together with a bit of wire, I then
stretch them around an old coffee tin and then put them in the
ultrasonic. This opens out the links and lets the dirt flow out.

This has to be one of the most unpleasant jobs in the business,
although the state of the backs of some watches that come in for
battery replacement isn’t too far behind. Can’t the owners see this
dirt?

Sod’s Law, the worst one will come in as a rush job, as your having
your lunch.

Neil KilBane,
Longford
Ireland.


#10
I usually look at the person with the nasty band, offer a
replacement Speidel and if they insist on me working on the watch
anyway I simply point out that I have to hug my kid with these
hands.

This was a great line - I doubt that the gunk in the watchband is
actually loaded with such harmful bacteria that you’d need to don
full-body suits, but I’m sure that years of accumulation of dead
skin and body oil is not a pleasant thing to have to deal with.

I wonder if an autoclave would be a good addition to your workshop?
At least you’d know that any potential pathogens were good and dead
before you did your cleaning.

Cheers,

Jessee Smith
www.silverspotstudio.com
Cincinnati, Ohio