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Citric Acid correction


#1

A couple of days ago I sent a posting to Orchid with info. I thought was
accurate re. Citric Acid being non-toxic.

A Gentleman by the name of Steve Ramsdell sent me an e-mail, which I truely
appreciate, pointing out that Citric Acid, in a diluted form (food grade)
is not toxic BUT in concentrated form, as is required for use in jewelry
making, is indeed TOXIC. (Did I really put that many words in one sentence?
My old English Teacher would have a stroke).

I have thanked Steve in an off-line e-mail message but would like to thank
him in front of the Orchid Community for correcting my oversite. I
sincerely apologize for submitting incomplete

Thanks Steve…I learned something

Warmest regards
Ken Shields


#2

The first thing everyone needs to learn is that anything that is not food
is not food. the second thing is don’t breath fumes. Material saftey data
sheets are available for just about every thing and you should have or get
them for any chemicals you use or intend to use. Read and understand them.
Even non toxic materials can be harmful in excess. Jesse


#3

Ken, did you know that even water in too great a quantity is toxic? I
suggest we take stop by the local college bookstore and get the reference
book for chemistry 101. It will explain almost all the questions as to
what is resonable to pour down the drain.

Etienne Perret
www.etienneperret.com


#4

Ken, Can you tell us at what quantities or concentration your friend feels
that citric acid is toxic? Toxic to what or to whom? Please explain, I am
very confused.

Karen Christians
M E T A L W E R X
416 Main St.
Woburn, MA 01801
781/937-3532
http://www.metalwerx.com/
@metalart

Current Artwork:

https://www.ganoksin.com/orchid/karen1.htm


#5

There seems to be a lot of confusion lately on the toxic vs. non-toxic
properties of citric acid. Since I believe it is not toxic and an
excellent substitute for Sparex, I am going to consult a friend of mine who
is a professor of chemistry at Harvard University.

Hopefully I will be able to put the question to bed once and for all.

I’ll keep you posted.

-k
Karen Christians
M E T A L W E R X
416 Main St.
Woburn, MA 01801
781/937-3532
http://www.metalwerx.com/
@metalart

Current Artwork:

https://www.ganoksin.com/orchid/karen1.htm


#6

Citric acid is one of the main ingredients for fizzing bath crystals. It
must be awfully concentrated to be toxic since at lower concentrations it’s
safe to bathe in!


#7
    There seems to be a lot of confusion lately on the toxic vs.
non-toxic properties of citric acid.  

G’day; Nearly all fruit contains citric acid, so does most soft drinks, -
that’s how toxic it is. However, I wouldn’t advise you to drink much of a
very strong solution; it would do your tummy lots of no good.
Cheers, and sing all the time - the birds are at present.


#8
   Ken, Can you tell us at what quantities or concentration your friend
feels that citric acid is toxic?  Toxic to what or to whom?  Please
explain, I am very confused. 

LD50-LC50 MixtuRe: ORAL LD50(RAT): 6730 MG/KG (From the MSDS.) That’s a bit
more than one pound for a 150 # subject, and only if he eats it. The lethal
dose of water, as I remember, is about 14 liters.

Al
mailto:@Alan_Balmer


#9

I have been a laboratory technician for 35 years, but you can take my word
or not. Citric Acid is one of the major components in most soft drinks,
and is no more toxic than they are. Phosphoric Acid is also in a lot of
soft drinks, but can be corrosive at full strength.

If you use Ferric Chloride, and or Ferric Nitrate, Please do not etch
steel or spill it on your metal work surfaces. No matter how carefully you
are in cleaning up, it still remains, and acts like a cancer to anything
that contains Iron (Ferric or Ferrous). You can neutralize it with
Ammonium Hydroxide, (Household Ammonia), but some times the cure is worse
than the disease.

Another CAUTION: Bleach and Ammonia produces Phosgene which was used
during World War I as a poisonous gas. Don’t mix NO HOW.

Rodger


#10

As per the head of Saftey Regulations at the Biology, Molecular and
Chemistry divisions at Harvard, I was given this MSDS sheet. She feels
that in the dilute quantities that we are using, there is no problem
putting this down the drain. Neutralizing with baking soda is a good idea,
but toxic it is not.

I used to work at the Bio Labs at Harvard for 8 years, and the person in
charge is very reputable.

I give you: http://www.msdsonline.com/DMSDS.asp?MSDS_Id=15126

Respectfully submitted,

-k
Karen Christians
M E T A L W E R X
416 Main St.
Woburn, MA 01801
781/937-3532
http://www.metalwerx.com/
@metalart

Current Artwork:

https://www.ganoksin.com/orchid/karen1.htm