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Cheap Stuff


#1

I’ve recently gotten opportunities to sell cheap stuff at
various outlets where I would like to sell: a web site, a store
associated with a national organization, etc. The products will
be well designed and well made, and made in base metals (copper,
brass, nickel, etc.), die struck and/or using (gasp) manufactured
parts. Obviously, this stuff will not be represented as
handcrafted, and I might even market it under a different compay
name.

What do people think of this? Has anyone else ever done this?
Any reason not to? Will the lure of easy money lead me down the
path of not doing the high end work anymore?

-Elaine
Chicago, IL
USA
Great Lakes
Hot, ozone warning days 2 or 3 in a row


#2

HI! Go for it! We all need more time in our lives, but, we
also need to pay all the bills and have time to do the great work
we think we were cut out to do. I assume that this "cheap stuff"
won’t be taking up a lot of your time, and will be much
profitable. That way, you grind out, or send out work leaving
you time for the better stuff of our brains. See what I’m doing
with all the scrap glass I have left after doing the "big"
stuff. <www.diacca.com> The big stuff is the plates and bowls,
but the broochs and earrings are also great fun. Have new
snowflake ornaments coming on-line soon. Which use up more
scrap, so they are reasonably priced. Pat


#3

Hello Elaine, It is easier to tell you how to solder or polish.
Personally, I think you should take the easy money and use it to
make the pieces closer to your heart. This is just my opinion.
Don’t do anything that will make you feel bad. . There. I have
straddled this fence quite successfully. Seriously, take the
money. Tom Arnold


#4
    What do people think of this?  Has anyone else ever done
this? Any reason not to?  Will the lure of easy money lead me
down the path of not doing the high end work anymore? 

Go for it!

You’ve got to eat to live & a steady income helps buy the
groceries & pay the rent.

If I were you though, I’d set a goal for myself. I’ve got to be
making X$, working N hours per week by date dd/mm/yy. If you
don’t achieve the goal scrap the program. Be sure to leave
yourself some time each day/week to work on your high end stuff.

Good Luck!

Dave


#5

Dear Elaine, Half your luck! Go for it. It’s all part of a
jeweller’s life’s rich tapestry. The more you know, the further
you go. Hoping you do well, Rex from Oz.


#6

I have some experience with this and thought I would pass it on.
I did one of a kind and limited edition work for 15 years when I
had the opportunity and backing to enter the end of jewelry more
along the lines of what you are referring to.

Be careful! It’s great if for no other reason than learning
about that end of the market BUT…there’s a lot more
pressure with major time constraints and the buyers who typically
buy in that arena (Nordstroms, Talbots, Nicole Miller etc.) are
unbelievably demanding. It’s nothing for them to call at say 12
noon and ask you to change a design or make it in 5 color groups
and oh…did they mention they need it overnighted so it’s in NYC
for a 10 a.m. meeting. The stories are so numerous it’s
impossible to go any farther here however make sure your VERY
CLEAR on your job and don’t burn any bridges in case you discover
something you could never have planned on and want to return to
the area your in now.

Good Luck, Susan in unbelievably hot Seattle