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Champagne Gold Alloy?


#1

What alloy is used to achieve 18K champagne shade of gold. Has
anyone experimented with this with results? Is this currently
patented? If yes, who has the rights to it?


#2

Which shade of champagne are you talking about? Veuve Cliquot? Moet?
Or perhaps a rose? Does it have to come from France to be called
champagne gold (since to be called champagne, bubbly wine certainly
does)? Or can it be a domestic one like Domaine Chandon?

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
@Daniel_R_Spirer
www.spirerjewelers.com


#3

Would that be Dry Champagne? Just kidding. But seriously, how can
anything other than a translucent material be that color? A brownish
tint? If somebody has a brown tinted gold, look out for the
ingredients and castability!

Daniel Ballard


#4

Daniel,

Couldn’t some of the white gold alloys be considered a Champagne
color or at least mixed to create this color since they have a slight
yellowish hue?

Greg DeMark
greg@demarkjewelry
www.demarkjewelry.com


#5

Daniel Squared,

A champagne gold would have to be an alloy blended in the Champagne
region of France. The alloy coming from the US would be termed a
sparkling alloy, not a champagne…by law.

A rose alloy would be a very different color from a brut!

Could there be a vintage associated with the alloy? 2004 was a very
good year…not as good a the new 2006 vintage, though.

I would like to sign up for a free tasting tour, when available.

PK


#6

Nicola,

What alloy is used to achieve 18K champagne shade of gold. Has
anyone experimented with this with results? Is this currently
patented? If yes, who has the rights to it? 

I’ve been using the name for any gold that isn’t distinctly pink or
yellow, for several years. Wasn’t aware that anyone else had come up
with the same idea…

I think wines of all sorts vary in color, and Champagne probably
does, too, according to the vintage. You could experiment and try to
match what you had at your last party, then the next bottle might not
be the same.

There’s a proprietary color from Hoover and Strong, Peach, which is
somewhat between yellow and pink, and I’ve used random combinations
of that, yellow, and pink gold in melts that rolled out to unique
colors, which, for lack of a better term, I refer to as “champagne
gold”. Short of sending a sample to a lab for a quantitative
analysis, there’s no way for me to tell you what’s in it, and that’s
part of its charm. :slight_smile:

You can look at a few places on my site to see what I mean.

http://www.golden-knots.com/champagne.html
http://www.golden-knots.com/ring1.html

Pictures don’t do it justice, and unless I’m looking at it in
natural light next to distinctly yellow or rose gold, I’m never quite
sure what it is.

Loren
http://www.golden-knots.com


#7
Does it have to come from France to be called champagne gold
(since to be called champagne, bubbly wine certainly does)? Or can
it be a domestic one like Domaine Chandon? 

Incidentally, I made ‘champagne’ onetime, and it was tasty, very
potent, and might I say, extremely explosive. After opening the first
bottle, and hosing my entire kitchen down with the contents, I
learned to take the remaining 25 or so bottles outside to open. From
each bottle, I would only get about a third of it after the initial
explosion.

Ed in Kokomo


#8

But seriously, folks,

Hoover and Strong has a “Peach Gold” alloy that is neither rose nor
yellow, but a nice in between color. Maybe “champagne” is a good
description…

BK in AK


#9
Could there be a vintage associated with the alloy? 2004 was a
very good year.........not as good a the new 2006 vintage, though. 

Well, the 2006 vintage champagne gold might not be as good as the
2004 but it’s sure going to be a lot more expensive! Perhaps if we
called it chardonnay gold it might come in a little cheaper. At least
that way it doesn’t have to be imported from the Champagne region.
But… on the more serious side there is a problem with using
somewhat generic types of names for color descriptions. Since, as has
been somewhat humorously discussed here, there are so many possible
shades of champagne how could anyone interpret what color “champagne
gold” might be? This is somewhat akin to the old “pigeon’s blood
ruby” description/problem. Not one person who has ever come in my
store and talked about “pigeon’s blood ruby” has ever actually seen
pigeon blood (I know this because I always ask them). Neither have I
(nor do I have any plans to). So why are these vague terms still in
use in the trade and why do we continue to torture ourselves with
more color descriptions that no one can really figure out what they
mean?

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
617-234-4392
@Daniel_R_Spirer
www.spirerjewelers.com


#10

What’s this, light yellow gold with lots and lots of porosity
(bubbles)?

:^)
michael b.
Foxfire jewelers


#11

I’ve been working too hard, I guess - the opportunity to make
Champagne jokes just blew right by me…HAHA. I did have a request
once, though, for a gold of more of a “Peach” color. Yellow was too
yellow and white was too white. The rest of her story doesn’t bear
repeating, but I was able to unload the piece I made for her
Anyway, simple enough - I just mixed white and yellow gold half and
half and got a very nice, peachy color that probably would qualify as
Champagne. More of a Veuve Clicquot than a Mumm’s, I think. Realise
this was 14kt, but the idea is the same for 18, I would think.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com