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Chains & strength


#1

In another thread Peter Rowe wrote:

For the record, I personally don't trust snake chains to have much
strength. Their visual weight makes them look considerably
stronger than they are, especially the thin ones like you used. The
are made with little interlocking parts that CAN pull apart,
sometimes easier than one might beleve from the visual weight of the
chain. Foxtail also gives you some of the same look and slight
resistance to twisting, and can also be bent or kinked, but it's
soldered shut wire links, and much harder to break. 

A customer was looking for a chain for a heavy religious pendent
that he wears 24/7, while running, swimming, etc He’s broken the
snake chain it was on. So we looked at small tight curb chains, omega
chains, as well as snake chains. He likes the look of the snake, but
doesn’t want to risk losing his pendent.

What are all your thoughts on which chains are tough and strong but
still looks sorta like snake. I echo everyone else’s thoughts. Snake
is lovely to behold but it breaks an inordinate amount, is tough to
solder on findings without weakening, and generally is a pita.

Carla


#2

Evaluation of strength and quality of chains
G. Raykhtsum and D.P. Agrawal

In recent years, we have witnessed a growing concern of manufacturers
and retailers regarding the quality of the jewelry products. Closer
attention is being paid to such issues as general aesthetic
appearance, surface finish, color consistency, strength and overall
durability of jewelry. Responding to the increasing quality
requirements, we have made an attempt to develop some specific
methods for testing the finished jewelry products including various
chains, bangle bracelets, castings and components. This work was
presented at the Santa Fe Symposium in 1995…

Read full article


#3
What are all your thoughts on which chains are tough and strong
but still looks sorta like snake 

Only a snake looks like a snake. We push wheat chains to those who
want a nice looking, strong, durable chain. Some want another look,
but wheat is a great chain…

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#4

Just a thought from a newbie: how about a non-silver chain, like
stainless? Welded, not soldered.


#5

I’ve also dealt with this issue. For my money, foxtail chain
(available round or flat or oval, etc.) is a good sturdy chain,
though it will kink if bent right back on itself. Your customer may
like a round woven chain (very masculine), but these are often heavy
and a bit stiff for daily wear.

My absolute favorite, although the texture is nothing like a snake
chain, is “wheat” or “spiga” chain. It’s attractive, suitable for
men or women, its fluidity makes it very comfortable to wear, and
I’ve yet to see one kink. I get mine from Santa Fe jewelry supply
(usual disclaimers).

My $0.02.

Jessee Smith
Cincinnati, OH
www.silverspotstudio.com


#6

I’ll add my 2c to Jessee’s. I agree completely that the wheat style
chains are wonderful!! I have used or recommended them for many
years to my customers. Additionally, I have worn one (the same one)
for the past 15 years and never had any problem with it. In fact,
several jump rings have worn through but the chain is still
going…just like the Energizer Bunny!!

Cheers from Don in SOFL.


#7
how about a non-silver chain, like stainless? Welded, not
soldered. 

You’re not anchoring a ship! You’re adorning a neck. Nothing wrong
with steel, tungsten, titanium, whatever you like the look of. And,
sure, it should hold up. But I’d like to think, when I wear a
necklace, that if it got caught on, oh, I don’t know, the door of a
train as I exited (think Rachel Barton), that the chain would give
before my neck did.

Noel


#8
What are all your thoughts on which chains are tough and strong
but still looks sorta like snake. I echo everyone else's thoughts.
Snake is lovely to behold but it breaks an inordinate amount, is
tough to solder on findings without weakening, and generally is a
pita. 

I’d guess your best bet for this would be either the wheat chains,
or the somewhat similar foxtail types. Stay away from Omegas. They’re
not as strong as they look.

Peter


#9

Currently I am using foxtail types of chain as well as snake chains,
depending on what looks best with the pendant. I have not had any
problems with kinking or breaking of either styles.

The foxtails have been purchased recently, but the snake chains were
purchased a number of years ago from Reo, which always has excellent
quality… I purchased them in bulk, cut them to the size I needed,
and attached the tubes and findings by soldering and have never had a
problem with them. They have held up very well…

As these snake chains were made a number of years ago, can it be
that the newer ones are not as well made, hence subject to breaking?

Alma Rands


#10

Does anyone have a good link for how to construction a wheat chain
(and some of the others mentioned), it might be in “Complete
Metalsmith” (Tim McCreight), I’ll have to look when I’m next at the
studio.

Thanks in advance,
K. David Woolley
Fredericton, NB