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Centrifugal casting machines


#1

Greetings to all, I just signed on to the list and I am looking for
recommendations or suggestions about centrifugal casting equipment.
I did some jewelry making and a little casting some years ago. I
would like to get back into it and want to purchase a small casting
machine. I will be casting only small jewely (rings, pendants,
earings etc.). I have a muffle furnace (5X5X8 id). I have been
looking at Kerr, Lucas, and Ney equipment (literature) and am at a
loss as to what direction to take. The Ney looks really safe and
simple but pricey. The Lucas and Kerr much better priced, seem to
have good reputations. Any suggestions, cautions, good or bad
experiences?

Thanks for your help.
-Brian


#2

I have used the original NEY machine for many years now and this
device has not let me down. In fact, in a difficult sitution between
moving and resetting the shop, I was forced to use it in my home
driveway. With the “almost self balancing” shell/protective rim" and
the base, the machine was set on a board between two saw horses and
worked fine with a little cinderblock weight on the sawhorses.

Failures with this NEY machine are almost always attributible to my
technique and not the machine. Unless you want to go for much higher
priced “do it all” machines set up for mass production, I don’t see
you going wrong with the NEY. It has served me well.

I have used firebrick and fiber lined burnout ovens. The NEY is a
fiber lined, or a more uniform formed high heat surface with the
heating elementd enclosed in the fiber material. This over has also
worked quite well for me. No probs. The lining is cracked a couple
of places after many, many years of work but all does well and not a
repair needed yet. I got this equipment several years ago, not sure
when but soon after it was first introduced on the market. If the
quality is the same as before, you are a go for Ney. If the quality
is better now, it is more of a go, regardless of the price
differentials with other brands. The compact “ready to go” aspect
of the Ney caster is to be appreciated, esspecially if you cannot
always have a permanent setup for your work.

This is my experience with the equipment you mentioned. I do hope it
helps in some measure.

God Bless.
Thomas.
@Sp.T
professional jeweler.


#3

Hello Brian. Welcome back to casting. You noted that the Ney-craft
is designed for safety. Big selling point to the school where I
teach and for my own personal studio. Once had a larger, broken-arm
with drum surround type and hated the ordeal of constantly having to
wrestle with the balances and reaching over into the drum. Sold it
and got the Ney I enjoyed at school. Never had a problem with either
one. Durable and easy to use. Worth the money to me. Very
repairable in all parts if ever one does wear out. Standard
disclaimer.

Pat


#4
   Once had  a larger, broken-arm with drum surround type and hated
the ordeal of constantly having to wrestle with the balances and
reaching over into the drum. Sold it and got the Ney I enjoyed at
school.  Never had a problem with either one.  Durable and easy to
use.  Worth the money to me. Very repairable in all parts if ever
one does wear out.   Standard disclaimer. 

Everyone seems to like the Ney, and for good reason. But in my case,
just starting out making one off pieces, I couldn’t afford it. I went
for the Lucas(although i purchased the dental one, 75SS) and couldn’t
be happier. Many had suggested going for the larger model, but this
one suits my needs(knowing that in a few years i’ll probably need
something more productive), and got a darn good deal off a “direct
from manufacturer” ebay auction. I make prototypes and odd items
using the lost wax casting process but enjoy fabricating much more.
Another option I had used was to get someone to cast my wax patterns,
but determined that the machine would pay for itself after a few
casts. So many toys, too little money.

Jonathan Brunet