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Casting Tie Tac Pinstems?


#1

Hi all! I need to make a large number of tie tac/lapel pins from
a sterling silver cast piece, and would like to avoid having to
solder each pin stem on individually. Would it work to have the
piece cast with the stem in place and then just polish it
afterward? Would it be strong enough and sharp enough to hold up
to the clutch? Would it end up being too think for the hole in
the clutch? Any other pluses or minuses? Would really
appreciate any Thanks, Sandra /ElegantBee.


#2

Look at a “Sparkie II”, works great for Tie Tacks, Ear Rings.
It can be a life saver for repairing earrings that can not be
reheated & the like. I originally got a “sparkie” & have wanted
the power & capabilities of the “II”.

Mark Chapman
@Mark_Chapman


#3

Could you have them attached with with a “Sparkie”. The quality
of the metal in the stem will be much better and the joint
shouldn’t require finishing beyond cleaning. Casting the post
would be cheaper but so would the product.

Dick Caverly


#4

HI! No, don’t cast them, they will be too soft, you need to
find someone with a fusion machine, this will attach a good
strong, sharp tac/pin quickly, cheaply and permanently. If you
can’t find someone, I could put them on for you. How many do you
need? Just let me know and I’ll give you a quote. Pat


#5
   Hi all! I need to make a large number of  tie tac/lapel
pins from a sterling silver cast piece,  and would like to
avoid having to solder each pin stem on individually.  

I think that this can work just fine. As an aside, after about
ten years on the bench, a tailor client brought a tie tac back to
me. He was complaining that I was destroying his neckties with
my tie tac posts. Seems that I had always thought that a super
fine point was a necessity with tie tacs. He pointed out to me
that these sharp points were piercing individual threads and
shredding them leaving a permanent hole in the tie. His solution
was a rounded point that was wiggled into the tie. Result is that
a round point passes between threads and will usually result on
no damage. I wonder what I owe for trashed ties over the previous
decade.

Bruce D. Holmgrain
Maryland’s first JA Certified Senior Bench Jeweler
@Bruce_Holmgrain


703-593-4652


#6

Hi sandra,

I had a quiet chuckle when I saw your query on the list. In WA
we have a project called the Premier’s Gift Commissioning
Project… it is supported by the Premier of the State… ( a bit
like the governor of a USA state) and the local state craft body.
The idea is to have local craftspeople design and manufacture a
range of objects that feature Western australian themes, flora,
mining etc . all to be made in WA. Local government,
parliamentarians, the corporate world , individuals, are
encouraged to buy them. They are all nicely packaged with a label
explaining the design, the maker and with a Government seal on
the label. All great selliing points. I was lucky enough to be
chosen in 1994 for a design of a lapel pin/tie tac which featured
a rough Argyle diamond. I took a punt and decided to have the
stem cast in situ on the back, thinking I would probalby sell
about 100 over the next two years. Well I have just ordered the
800!! The thought of soldering on 800 backings would really take
away a lot of pleasure!!

I thought I would mention the project in case someone might like
to import it into their own state!

some things to take note

Make the stem about10% longer to allow for shinkage. Make it out
of slightly thicker wire, so that when it shrinks the clutch back
wont fall off Make sure it is perfect before you rubber it have a
good rubber maker, it you dont do it yourself. The mould maker/
caster really hates making them because the waxes are fiddley to
do with this "blasted ? pin sticking out. I harden the stem by
putting it in a hand held pin vise, give it a couple of turns I
run fine sandpaper, on a dowell stick, over the ends, take the
cutters and make a deeper groove and thats it.

I have just been chosen for the next project, and once again am
making a tie tac, lapel pin. and will stick with the same method.
Good luck

Felicity in west Oz where spring is in the air!


#7

Sandra, I don’t know about casting, (you’ll have plenty of help
on that end I’m sure) but I do have a Sparkie that has been
looking for work. I put sterling earposts, tietack backs on all
the time with it.

kathi parker
MoonScape Designs
Maynard, MA


#8

Sandra:

Have you considered using a fusion welder to attach the tie tack
findings? If you do not have one there are people who do contract
fusing of findings.

Just a suggestion.

Kenneth Gastineau
@Kenneth_Gastineau1
http://www.ud.net/gastineau


#9

Hi Sandra, I’ve tried that a few years back and the fears that
you have stated are true. Between shrinkage,clean up, and keeping
a nice sharp point it just does’nt seem worth all the trouble.
Not to mention I believe it’s a bit more time consuming. I hope
it helps. Michael B


#10
   Hi all! I need to make a large number of  tie tac/lapel
pins from a sterling silver cast piece,  and would like to
avoid having to solder each pin stem on individually.  Would it
work to have the piece cast with the stem in place and then
just polish it afterward?  Would it be strong enough and sharp
enough to hold up to the clutch?  Would it end up being too
think for the hole in the clutch?  Any other pluses or minuses?
 Would really appreciate any 

You might get away with it, but I’d expect the combination of
cast surfaces and annealed cast metal and shrinkage (etc)
problems to lead to a less then perfect pin part. The wire will
have mold marks, like as not, won’t be quite round anymore, and
easily bent.

My suggestion would be to consider this a great excuse to buy a
sparky fusion welder. That little gem of a machine can whack
nice clean tie tack posts on your pieces almost faster than the
additional polishing time you’d have if the pins were cast in
place. With a little practice, you could easily do a hundred or
more in an hour… And once you’ve got it, it’s a pretty handy
(though specialized) tool have around, not just for production
work with earring posts and tie tacks, but for repairs to same,
especially on work that cannot be safely heated for soldering.

Peter Rowe


#11

The point needs to be sharp. What makes a big difference is the
finish all along the pin. Constantly sliding the clutch on and
off, often with a heavy hand, can ruin the finish and leave rough
places, sometimes with a tiny burr that picks the thread.
Especially in silk.

So, as our illustrious president might say, sharpen the point
and polish the stem. Yes, I know, a cheap shot - but I couldn’t
resist it.