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Casting counter balance


#1

Ho Ho Ho to all. I’ve searched the threads and have not found the
info I’m looking for. I have a swing arm casting machine and it has
weights on one end. I presume to counter balance the load on the
other end when you cast. How do you know how many weights to put on
that end of the machine. I’m getting some big vibrations when casting
bigger loads of metal. is there a way to balance this thing some
where along the way I was sleeping when that was discussed. Thanking
everyone in advance for for the great info I always receive when
asking a question

Rick Sindeband
Skystone and Silver
rick@skystoneandsilver.com


#2
I have a swing arm casting machine and it has weights on one end. I
presume to counter balance the load on the other end when you cast.
How do you know how many weights to put on that end of the machine.
I'm getting some big vibrations when casting bigger loads of metal.
is there a way to balance this thing some 

Hi Rick,

This is why I love my Neycraft!!! I had a swing arm years ago and
my father-in-law didn’t get the balancing concept and due to the
wrong balance, ended up bending the turning shaft resulting in what
we named the “duck and run” method of casting - the flask would fly
out of the cradle, shoot by your head and land across the room. Not
recommended!!! So, as you can imagine, Balancing is very
important especially with the swing arm type, after you have loaded
the flask and crucible, adjust the weights so that both sides are
level, like a teeter-totter that is balanced evenly.

Marta


#3

Dear Rick,

I don’t have a Neycraft caster, but assume it operates the same way.
I don’t think the Neycraft has a center locking nut though. With a
Grobet or Vigor centrifugal caster the weights look like doughnuts
and are put on the one end of the casting machine. They are then hand
tightened so they won’t move. Doing all this cold is the correct way.
Place your cold invested flask in the cradle with the casting metal
in the melting crucible. Loosen the center screw in the very middle
of the casting arm. The whole arm should balance like a see saw. Move
the weights until it does. Tighten the center nut when it balances.
Do this with the smallest flask you use first. This flask size should
be 2" X 3", largest size being the largest flask able to fit in the
machine. I cast primarily three different size flasks at school and
at my own shop. Stay with these three flask sizes and calibrating the
flask each time is very easy and you can always balance your casting
that way. An off balance casting machine may also throw the molten
metal out of the flask. I usually add one doughnut shaped weight per
flask size. You may even duc tape the first weight position so it
doesn’t move. (Did anyone else read about duc tapes ability to remove
warts? great stuff!) So I don’t have to rebalance each flask from
scratch. They are always cold so even casting several flasks I switch
them going from one size to another.

Best Regards,

Todd Hawkinson,
www.trhawkinson.com
www.ajt-online.com

T.R. the Teacher
www.mctc.mnscu.edu/jewelry