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Buying a lathe


#1

I am trying to purchase a smaller metal lathe ( approx. 7x10 1/3hp)
in the NYC area - i’m a little wary of buying used as I may get
someone else’s machinery problems. So, is there anyway to actually
see a new lathe before you spend the $100 shipping on it? Do I have
to drive to the closest showroom? and is the closest one for any
brand really in western PA? There must be some place to see one
closer! Do I have any other options than making a rather large blind
purchase?

Thanks for any ideas you’ve got!


#2

Fred DeVos is a wax teacher in NYC and is great and he sells a lathe

  • not because he needs to make money … But because it is a really
    wonderful precise machine he uses for his own work and when I get
    enough money I would love to buy one! He is a terrific teacher and he
    can help you.

http://www.freddevos.com/courses2.html

Fred de Vos Wax Workshops

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Jennifer
Benusis


#3

Hi Lil,

Have you been to http://www.mini-lathe.comThis is an excellent
resource. I used them and
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/7x12minilathe/ , the mini-lathe user
group on yahoo, to research my purchase of a Cummins 7x12. I’m very
happy with my purchase.

Perhaps you can find a ‘local’ store or even a lathe owner in your
area through them.

Best Regards,
Chuck
www.goldenspirit.com


#4

Hi Lil,

I will be purchasing a small lathe in the near future. I have used
a Sherman lathe and found it to be a good machine (in a jewellery
school where it got a lot of abuse) - lots of accessories available
and the company has been in business for a long time.

Best of luck,
Donna Hiebert


#5

I have a simple way to turn wax with a foredom handpiece mounted in
a Pana vice using simple scraping tools. If any of you are looking
for a lathe to turn wax you might be interested in the paper I
wrote about the Poor Mans Wax Turning Process. I have turned
everything from rings to large 3.5 inch dia by 5 inch tall wax
pots. The process is not a precise as a lathe but one heck of a
bunch cheaper.

I would be glad to send you a copy of the process, free, If you
send me your snail mail address. The paper contains many photos and
is difficult to e-mail. The process was described in four issues of
Lapidary Journal, Dec 2002 and Jan-Mar 2003.

Lee Epperson


#6
Do I have any other options than making a rather large blind
purchase? 

On second thought, Lil, what are you going to use the lathe for? If
you’re turning small diameter rod, you could fit it that into your
flex shaft chuck. I use a file to shape wire in mine.

You can also set up your flex shaft very inexpensively to turn wax
rings.

Chuck
www.goldenspirit.com


#7

Sorry, the lathe is a Sherline lathe

   I will be purchasing a small lathe in the near future.  I have
used a Sherman lathe and found it to be a good machine (in a
jewellery school where it got a lot of abuse) - lots of accessories
available and the company has been in business for a long time. 

Best of luck,
Donna Hiebert


#8

Joel Schwab has a very good metal lathe for sale

This is North of New York City.

It is a complete lathe in good condition. Get dimensions from him.

If you cannot contact him let me know.

Kenneth Singh
@KARAT46


#9

If I remember correctly, the original poster wanted to see lathes in
person, as opposed to ordering one to be shipped. Harbor Freight has
inexpensive lathe/milling machine combos, and they also have stores
in New York. try a peek at their web site www.harborfreight.com to
see if they have one near you.

James in SoFl


#10

G’day Since there have been a few notes about the subject, I
thought I might put in a cents-worth. Firstly the act of using a
lathe is NOT “latheing” but ‘turning’. Wood turning, plastic, metal
turning etc.

In British countries, a person earning a living at it (a
professional) is usually a fitter and turner.

My experience is that there some very important aspects of turning,
One is speed. The general rule is that the softer the material, the
higher the turning speed. Thus wood needs a much faster speed than
say, steel. A most important item is the cutting tool. A differently
sharpened tool is used for each material; the angle of the tool to
the work is only one necessity. The shape of the cutting edge is
terribly important too, to get a good clean finish on the work. The
hardness and temper of the tool is also important. You cannot learn
the best use of a lathe from books, especially tool sharpening. You
must go to a professional and ask to be shown how and allowed to
repeat the demonstration in front of the professional. It’s trickier
than it looks, believe me, and there is much to learn.

By the way; this sharpening comment applies to a twist drill bit
too.

Cheers for now,
JohnB of Mapua, Nelson NZ