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Brown Polymer should be named 'tan'


#1

A little while back a guy named Rand posted an inquiry to us to try
out some “grease” or lubricant he invented. I asked him to send me a
sample.

I’ve been using it for a while for various things and I must say I’m
impressed. I tested it on a drill bit. You know how when you drill in
gold or silver and those little chips jump out of the hole? With this
stuff a long curled wire comes out instead. And there’s no chattering
like the sound you hear just before your bit snaps off and gets stuck
in the hole. I’ve used it in my various bur work. It really works
well.

I also used it to lube my saw blades. I work exclusively with 8/0
blades. This lube was like magic! It helped me cut faster and much
straighter. The only problem I have with it is in applying it to my
sawblades. Its texture is like warm butter so I find myself using my
fingers to apply it to the blade. This can be a problem if one is in
a hurry as those sawblades are rather sharp.

I also use it on my drawplate. It doesn’t rub off like any
conventional waxs and has a nice odor. It’s also fairly white so it
doesn’t stain. I’ve tested it as a lube for bright-cutting and
engraving and pave’, and it worked like magic, but I use a GraverMax
so YMMV.

It looks like saddle-soap and smells like Johnson’s Paste Wax, but
it’s really better than that bur-lube they sell and I’m gonna go
ahead and buy a big tub of it.

The guy who sells it is here http://www.enjenjoesproducts.com

Ray


#2

This a letter From in Honolulu, Hawaii She requested a sample
and this is what says.

Yes, I have smeared the polymer on many different things. I was
going to see how it did this past week. So far, the results have
been very good. 

I put it on the unpainted surfaces and foot of my sewing machine
and the surfaces have been rust free. At first, it rubbed off on
my hands and was a dirty mess. Maybe I should have cleaned the
surface first with steel wool. After rubbing it well, the surface
smoothed out and is rust free. It doesn't get on the fabrics
which have been heavy duty polyesters and nylons. I also worked
on some salty things and bags that must have rubbed hard on these
surfaces. I usually have to wipe the rust off after a couple of
days of non use. 

I have smeared it on a steel block which sits on my bench and so
far, no rust. I put it on the jaws of the flex shaft that are
always rusting. I'd like to try it on my pliers. At the Art
Center's metal studio, I have greased the stakes, railroad ties,
anvil, rolling mill, some hammers, and the tables of a sander
(which has been a troublesome spot with weekly rust). I was
really encouraged to find that a week later, all were rust free!
It is very encouraging and there hasn't been any problems with it
reacting to the silver and copper the students use. It really
cuts down on maintenance. I just thought of another spot I'd like
to try it on this weekend. 

It has been really humid and rainy the last couple of days so
this will be a good test. I think we have found a good solution
for things that rust and won't have to keep everything in plastic
all the time. It's kind of liberating! 

Will keep you posted with any new results.

#3
I also used it to lube my saw blades. I work exclusively with 8/0
blades. This lube was like magic! It helped me cut faster and much
straighter. The only problem I have with it is in applying it to
my sawblades. Its texture is like warm butter so I find myself
using my fingers to apply it to the blade. This can be a problem if
one is in a hurry as those sawblades are rather sharp. 

I figured out a way to apply it when sawing. I just put a bit on the
piece I’m cutting and it transfers to the blade.

I also use it on my drawplate. It doesn't rub off like any
conventional waxs and has a nice odor. It's also fairly white so
it doesn't stain. I've tested it as a lube for bright-cutting and
engraving and pave', and it worked like magic, but I use a
GraverMax so YMMV. 

I got my Big Tub. I just can’t get over this stuff. It works so much
better than that stuff Stuller sells for keeping your burs from
heating up. The only drawbacks I can find are that since it’s so
soft, it tends to clog up burs if you use too much, but fortunately
it doesn’t require that you use much at all, and it can easily get in
the way of soldering if you don’t take care to remove it from an area
you intend to solder. The manufacturer says that only turpentine
removes it, but actually acetone, an ultrasonic with ammonia, and
steam removes it enough to solder. I used it on a #4 file that I was
using on platinum, and on an inside ring bur. It stopped the
chattering instantly on the bur, and made filing much smoother and
faster. I also use it on the threads of a lamp I bought at Target
tonight, and last week used it on a customers finger to remove a
stuck ring!

The maker calls it “Snake Oil.” I’m beginning to understand why! :slight_smile:

Ray


#4

I just recived the sample the other day, looking foward to trying it.
will write more soon as i can try it, there is lots of wet weather up
here in maine so it should be an excellent test site.

thanks mike


#5

I have been using this on my copper pieces and I have been surprised
at how it has maintained the color I wanted to preserve. I apply to
the surface with my finger or a small wad of paper napkin and it
goes on like a thin wax. The film or coating left behind seems
durable. I have yet to try it on a patinated piece but with the color
tones left from heating the piece there appears to be a subtle
enhancement of colors unlike lacquer which seems to alter the “tone
or richness” of the colors. I’ve only been using this stuff for a
month or six weeks but have been pleased to date. It would be worth
while to those seeking a “friendlier” approach to a maker/user
friendly finish and tarnish preventer.


#6

Hello Orchidland,

I bought a couple small jars of the polymer lubricant. It goes a
looooong way. My main concern was protection against rust, and the
website touts the product as being an effective rust retardant. So I
lightly coated all my Fe-based tools, mandrels, mill, anvil, etc. -
we’ll see how this fares in time. I haven’t tried it for lubricating
blades and burs, but am anxious to see how it compares to the
lubricant I’ve been using.

I’m asking anyone else on the forum who has tried this product to
please share your uses and the results you got. Mucho gracias, Judy
in Kansas, where the eastern part of the state got hammered with ice
and lots of snow, but nothing in my town.


#7

I tried to find this lubricant on the web but I guess I don’t know
what I am looking for. Where do I get some? From what I have been
reading in the posts, I need some of this stuff.

Thanks,
Joyce


#8

it can be found at enjenjoesproducts.com you can order from here
or contact sales@enjenjoesproducts.com

Thanks Randy
AKA Enjen joes


#9

I got my order of brown polymer very promptly–but no instructions.
Actually I am only uning it on my dapping block and tools which have
rusted due to a leak in a nearby water line.

Help anyone??
Joyce


#10

You just rub the grease where you need lubrication. The material
sticks to what ever surface it’s rubbed on once rubbed it will stay
with that surface as alube or corrosion provention

Thanks Randy AKA Enjen joe


#11
I got my order of brown polymer very promptly--but no
instructions. 

I’d try using Naval Jelly http://tinyurl.com/2escl

on the rust first to remove it, then Brownpolymer to keep it from
rusting again.

Note: naval jelly will remove the rust but not the pitting caused by
the rust.

Use the polymer in the same way you’d use any cutting oil.

Ray


#12

Hi! every one.

I have been asked to write this info on what is Brownpolymer but it
should be called tan.

about 13 yrs ago My new girl friend and I got this idea to be a
crafter at a ren fair. most all the trades had been taken so I
thought
I would do metal spinning. I could not do it period. the metal galled
to the forming bar, So I looked for a better lubricate. Research old
books from the 14 century I found a formula for a compound but the
change over from old English in the conversion I goofed and used
different compounds then what was stated. It created Brownpolymer but
was different. It was hard not soft like it is now, but I was able to
Spin copper And Aluminum.

Now I had to do clean up. I used my girl friends blender to mix the
compound and when I went to clean it up I found it would not wash
out with any solvent that I had. Even water had no effect. The parts
I made I was unable to clear paint as I could not removes this stuff.
The only people I found it to like it was where a rubbing action or
bearing surface needed a lube.

in 2004 A friend ask me to do a car show for him with 2 weeks to
prepare. I made some of this compound and put it in tins named old
timer Grease. The first 5 minutes I sold out to people that was using
on their polished parts on there motors. What they liked was that
Gasoline had no effect on the aluminum and it kept it shine.

Then I went to S.U. in Syracuse and it was tested with as many
solvents that we thought would liquefy it. that’s when it was found
to
be a polymer and was not in any books for the compound that I used.
So I asked what to call it and there responds was call it anything
you want. So my name is Brown and its a polymer so Brownpolymer was
started. Further testing by University of New Mexico did test and
found that the grease or polymer was equal to the best grease made
and
the compound where safe, But they requested that I get further
testing and certification for the bearing market. which was about
55,000 dollars. Then we had a marine biologists he put some on a
block of steel and placed it in our Lake Ontario which is full of
Zebra mussel that can stick to anything you don’t want. For 9 months
they didn’t cling to it which worried me. So I found a toxicity lab
and we did a test and found it was not Toxic is was they could not
adhere to the surface.

Further testing I found that turpentine dissolved the compound and
it was able to remove it from a surface and conventional cleaner
would remove the turpentine.

So we been giving the polymer to different testers of different uses
and needs the results aRe:

We found that we put on silver conches on saddles it didn’t tarnish
after one year of application with daily use on the horse.

Turning Tool steel with, To high of speed and slight dull bit was
applied to the turning. Chips went from red-blue to white and no
tearing, smooth cuts. We found easy to tap, saw cutting, burring and
punching. For drilling or machining gold or silver it has been found
to be the best found.

testing on bare steel with salt water in the air 2 weeks the steel
didn’t rust. it’s been tested on silver, Copper, Brass, Aluminum with
no sign of tarnishing

We tested on brass and was put in a tank of solution to bright
brass, to remove the scale on the brass with no effect the brass
didn’t change color.

We polished aluminum and coated with the polymer and poured battery
acid on the aluminum with no effect. The acid just puddled and ran
off.

We found That I could be put on ceramic, tile, glass, and porcelain
that soap scum would not stay on or build up

We found that lock smiths its a great lube for the bolts on safes
with out sticking or gumming up the tumblers.

We found that when rubbed on a surface it will clean and remove
tarnish and leaves a corrosion preventing film.

This Product we found is
Its a cleaner
Its a polish
Its a Lube
Its a Grease
Its a tarnish Prevention

One of the Professor described the way the polymer works. That the
platelets of carbon when rubbed lay down and forms a shield. that
repels water and dirt. We found that the polymer has the same
Ionization as water and dirt has. So it repels just like two magnets
do. It does stop air but water doesn’t like to be near it.


#13

Callcbm, are you affiliated with the manufacturing company? If so it
would be nice to know…

dee


#14
are you affiliated with the manufacturing company? If so it would
be nice to know.... 

No I do this out of my studio I’m still working on making equipment
for filling and putting labels on. The way I do it now is with a
wooden spoon and cram the polymer in then take a wooden stick and
take off the excess. Very crude system but it works the containers
are filled with the right volume if you fill to the top then check on
the scales. I’m only able to fill so many containers before I tire.

Thanks Randy
AKA Enjen joes
Enjenjoesproducts.com


#15
Callcbm, are you affiliated with the manufacturing company? If so
it would be nice to know.... 

Yes Callcbm Is my Email Address I don’t use Enjen Joes as of Yet I
was interested in jewlery and sign up for the forum with my personal
email and saw where I might have found a use for the product. I’m
the founder and maker of Enjen joes Products Brownpolymer

Thanks Randy
AKA Enjen Joes


#16

Hello, Callcbm!

This line of your message caught my eye:

I would do metal spinning. I could not do it period. the metal
galled to the forming bar, So I looked for a better lubricate.
Research old books from the 14 century I found a formula for a
compound but the change over from old English in the conversion I
goofed and used different compounds then what was stated. 

I am very interrested in sources about metalworking in the 14th
century. Would you please share the names and info about these books
and where you were able to do your research?

Thanks!

Laurel Cavanaugh
www.medievaljeweler.com