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Bracelet repair question


#1

I am a jewellery novice asked to repair a bezel set garnet bracelet -
all that is wrong is the small jump ring between the clasp and the
main body of the bracelet keeps popping open as it is un-soldered. I
presume that this is because any heat in the area of the clasp would
temper the clasp and lose the spring is this correct?

I can easily make a new jump ring and put into place but unless
soldered or adapted the same jump ring will follow this one in future.
any suggestions


I hope this is the correct way to submit a question its my first
time.


#2
I hope this is the correct way to submit a question its my first
time. 

Perfect!
Yes, solder it.

The manufacturer cut corners he shouldn’t have cut.

Paf Dvorak


#3
I am a jewellery novice asked to repair a bezel set garnet
bracelet - all that is wrong is the small jump ring between the
clasp and the main body of the bracelet keeps popping open as it is
un-soldered. I presume that this is because any heat in the area of
the clasp would temper the clasp and lose the spring is this
correct? 

I’m no expert, but I’ll toss out my two cents worth anyway. I was
once told that it’s always good to have one ‘weak’ link in a bracelet
or necklace in case it gets caught on something.

The weak link will give, preventing the jewelry from injuring the
wearer. The thought behind that is ‘better to lose the jewelry than
get your arm or neck broken by it’.

Having said that, it is possible to solder the ring onto the
clasp, but you would need to be very, very careful to protect both
the clasp and the nearest stone from the heat of the torch.

It could also be welded with a laser welder if you know someone who
has one.

It might be easier to just put a heavier jump ring on there (made
from the thickest wire that will fit through the clasp).

Kathy Johnson
featheredgems.com


#4

Hello Jeremy,

Nice photos BTW - helps to understand your problem.

The jump ring gauge used is too small for starters - it’s just not
strong enough. If you solder a jump ring next to the clasp, you run
into the problem of heating the steel spring inside the clasp so that
it loses its tension and the clasp won’t stay closed.

In cases like this, I use split rings. Most suppliers have them.
They are small versions of a common key ring. The wire circles twice,
and then doesn’t pull apart. It is helpful to have the nifty pliers
that open one side of the split ring and allow you to feed that side
through the clasp and bracelet end ring.

Just Google ‘split ring’ for sources.

Judy in Kansas, where a very heavy rain is soaking into the ground.
This will probably stimulate the lawn and it will need another
mowing!


#5

I’d just use a water torch or a laser to solder it without burning
the clasp spring or garnets. Get in and out really fast and have
water close by.

Or… I have also taken apart lobster claw clasps many times.
Separate the two halves just enough to coax out the spring and
moveable center section. Be sure to protect the garnets and then
solder. Then reassemble the clasp.

The easiest and least risky fix would be to use a sturdy14 kt white
gold jump ring that is stiff enough to hold up without soldering.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.

Jo Haemer
timothywgreen.com


#6

If you go in hot and fast WITH A LITTLE TORCH this can be soldered.
An easier fix would be to buy a jump ring link that is self-locking.
Look at Rio Grande or any other large supplier.

HTH,
M’lou


#7

Hi Jeremy

easy way use a stainless steel split ring.

Harder way solder jump ring into bracelet open clasp mechanism
insert jump ring and reassemble.

Richard


#8

Try using a larger gauge wire for a new jump ring. It seems to me
they don’t separate as easily. OOPs I mean a thicker wire, which
would have a smaller gauge number.

Jean


#9

A quick and easy solution is to use the silver link lock jump rings.
These don’t need any solder and have a mechanical locking system to
keep them closed.

The other thing you can use is heat shield or the Rio Chill gel.
This wouldhelp shield the stone and clasp from quick exposure to the
heat from the torch. Use the silver paste solder and go in hot and
fast with a little torch. Should solder in a few seconds and the
Chill Gel should protect everything from the heat.

Phillip Scott
Technical Support
Rio Grande


#10
but unless soldered or adapted the same jump ring will follow this
one in future. 

Having an open link on a necklace or bracelet is the same lousy
school teaching that we just can’t seem to pound out of existence.
Where that ever came from… Maybe just an excuse to be lazy, I
don’t know.

This is an easy, standard goldsmithing job but you need a small
flame. You just hold the jump ring with self locking tweezers with
the seam up and all the rest of the stuff hanging below, solder
witha small hot flame so the overflow of the flame goes off into
airspace behind, and you’re done. Maybe harder for a novice but it’s
something you should learn anyway.


#11
You just hold the jump ring with self locking tweezers with the
seam up and all the rest of the stuff hanging below, solder witha
small hot flame so the overflow of the flame goes off into airspace
behind, and you're done. 

After giving everything a firecoat, I would hold the clasp in the
tweezers, because the tweezers will act as a heat sink, providing a
level of protectionfor the clasp and its spring. I do the same when
making chains - hold the adjacent (already soldered) links in the
tweezers, and the jump ring to be soldered sits on top. I always make
sure that the ring to be soldered can sortof move freely, ie rock
back and forth. This isolates the heat even more and makes it easy to
get it up to soldering temperature without anything else (the clasp
in this case) even changing colour.

Helen
UK


#12
The easiest and least risky fix would be to use a sturdy14 kt
white gold jump ring that is stiff enough to hold up without
soldering. 

For connections like this, I prefer to use oval jump rings. (Reduces
stress on the point ofclosure)

Jim Harkins


#13

Thank you all for suggestions, talked to the client and they are
happy I use a sterling split ring.

This is a great place for especially as workshop jobs
or experience are hard to find in Christchurch New Zealand post
quake.


#14

I’ve seen a lot of answers to the OP’s question that suggested
"solutions" other than the easiest, time-honored, and IMO best one.

Learn to solder jump rings without destroying the spring in catches.

It’s not rocket surgery and something the average jeweler should be
able to do.

Learn to do it, OP!

Paf Dvorak


#15

Ive looked back at the original image of this bracelet, and in my
view the catch is really out of character to the rest of the piece.

So if it was in my hands to repair, id scrap the existing catch, and
make up from hard drawn sterling wire an “S” catch from a thickness
1.5 times the thickness of the 2 large jump rings. These are safe in
use, will break in an emergency, and wont need any soldering.

But then im fussy about design intent and compatability.