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[Book] Metalwork and Enamelling


#1

Dear All,

My name is Jacek A. Rochacki, I am
artist-goldsmith/metalsmith/silversmith/jeweler, author of texts on
goldsmithing and teacher of goldsmithing, etc. I live an work in
Warszawa, Poland, Eastern Europe. I use the books of Erhard Brepohl
all my life and I happen to know the author in person.

I write here to say, that with all respect to the great knowledge
and importance of work of my friend-prof. Brepohl I am a little
surprised that nobody of persons who’s letters were published in here
didn’t mention the really good book by Herbert Maryon “Metalwork and
Enamelling”, Dover Publications, Inc. New York, 1971, International
Standard Book Number 0-486-22702-2, Library of Congress Catalog Card
Number: 76-130881.

Mr. Herbert Maryon (1874 - 1965) served as Technical Attache in
British Museum 1945-1963 and was recognised as top class speccialist
after his great work with reconstruction of Sutton Hoo treasure in
the British Museum.

I consider the Herbert Maryon book as one of the three major books
in our craft - together with Untracht’s and Brepohl’s - which years
ago was recomended to me, and which I am always recomending to
everybody.

By this occasion I would like to recomend also the not so known book
on basics of metalurgy for goldsmiths by Ernest A. Smith, title
"Working in precious metals", N.A.G. Press Ltd., London 1933, 1978,
1980. Still sensible in 2001.

To end with: let us remember on the other book of prof. Brepohl
which is not translated to English yet. The title is “The Monk
Teophilus and the Medieval Goldsmithing”. This is elaboration of the
oldest in European history manual goldsmith’s book by Monk Teophilus
written ca 1122. Prof. Brepohl has checked out in praxis every word
written by the author. The results are amazing. Everything written in
1122 proved to be sensible and a lot is to be used in today’s small
handicraft workshop. Under the influence of this book many of us has
started to use as pickling solution for silver the lemon acid instead
of sulphuric acid. The lemon acid dilluted in water does the job
well, is not harmfull to the skin and clothes, does not produce
dangerous fumes, is more ecologic, etc., etc.

With my best regards

Jacek
@Jacek_A_Rochacki


#2

Hello Jacek and all! Just read something interesting in the original
post:

 Under the influence of this book many of us has started to use as
pickling solution for silver the lemon acid instead of sulphuric
acid. The lemon acid dilluted in water does the job well, is not
harmfull to the skin and clothes, does not produce dangerous
fumes, is more ecologic, etc., etc. 

Is lemon acid the real name for it, or is it more like citric acid?
Is this acid available anywhere? Tell me quickly, as I’ll change my
pickling solution instantly. Every silversmith should do the same;
why pollute when there is too much of it and when another product
does the same job?

Benoit Hamel


#3

It’s one of the first books in the field that I ever got, and I
recommend to anyone who want’s to learn the techniques that underlay
todays intensely precise production orientated standards. It’s a
very good starting point for a hobbyist like myself who wishes to go
beyond the basics like beading and wire-wrap.

 Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
 @Ron_Charlotte1 OR afn03234@afn.org