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Blanking dies


#1
I see what he means by having the saw at an angle, which would
be different for different thicknesses of sawblade and metal,
and which would result in the space between the mating dies
being extremely small. To  saw accurately like that would
certainly need a jig, and I expect someone has already designed
that: it wouldn't be too difficult.  But I wasn't really
interested in making shaped bits of paper or foil; I needed to
stamp small shapes  out of 0.5mm thick annealed sheet sterling
and my gadgets certainly do that - I can prove it!

Hi John…At no point did I mean to imply that you could not do
what you said. If I have offended you, please accept my
apologies. My reason for provididing additional is
that many people do not work well from text and prefer a sketch.
My website provides that sketch (several actually) as well as a
photograph of a blanking die.

The reason for sawing at at angle is pretty obvious and you
immediately recognised it. By using an angle, the burr is
completely eliminated and there is no clean-up necessary. You get
a very crisp edge. I mentioned that paper or foil could be cut
with this method. The same die would also cut the material that
you are cutting. The only thickness limitation on a blanking die
is that you cannot cut material that is thicker than the die. For
example, a fellow that I know is cutting spur rowels (the star
looking thing on the back of a cowboy’s boot) out of 3/16" thick
steel using a blanking die. He sawed the die out of 3/16" thick
tool steel and heat treated it. To saw the die at an angle does
utilize a jig to hold the die blank at the specific angle, and
yes it has been designed and once again is shown on my website,
under the section “Metalsmithing Tools”.

So, to sum up, the units I described do work well for small
quantities of small items. They need the small burr to be
removed and a small amount of general tidying up which I find,
takes little time with a handpiece sanding disc. And yes, they
would be quite useless for production runs. 

Yes, but with a little bit more effort, you could eliminate a
lot of time consuming deburring. I don’t know what metals you
work with, but if semi-precious, fines don’t bring much back from
the refiner.

If professional engineers
don't like the units to be called blanking dies, well, that's OK
by me, I don't really mind.   But whatever you like to call
them, take my word for it; given the obvious limitations, they
DO work.

I am not a professional engineer. I really don’t care what
people call me as long as it is not late for lunch. What you have
made and described is what I would call a blanking die. It
obviously works. All that I am trying to say is that with a
little refining, you could wind up with crisp edge parts that
would not require any clean-up. Please take a look at the
website. I am constantly adding new techniques and tips to it
that are in the “learn” section.

Take care
Lee Marshall
Bonny Doon Engineering http://www.bonnydoonengineering.com


#2

Rio Grande sells or used to sell a blanking die and press kit-
It included a saw and a sort of jig that could be lined up
precisely for the right cutting angle to saw the die. It also
had a very nice press and a few pieces of mild steel. I could
not seem to ever saw the dies out properly, and it took forever!
I returned that part of the kit, and kept the press. I think
that someday, I’ll find someone who will saw the dies for me. I
think Rio will still sell each part of the kit separately. Foxy


#3

Foxymom123@aol.com wrote:

Rio Grande sells or used to sell a blanking die and press kit-
It included a saw and a sort of jig that could be lined up
precisely for the right cutting angle to saw the die.  It also
had a very nice press and a few pieces of mild steel.  I could
not seem to ever saw the dies out properly, and it took forever!
I returned that part of the kit, and kept the press.  I think
that someday, I'll find someone who will saw the dies for me.  I
think Rio will still sell each part of the kit separately.  Foxy

Your experience with the RT saw is pretty typical, and is the
reason that I developed the saw guide that I sell. In a previous
post, I mentioned Dave Shelton. He saws out blanking dies to your
design. He can be reached at 505-256-7073

Lee Marshall
Bonny Doon Engineering http://www.bonnydoonengineering.com


#4

Rio Grande sells or used to sell a blanking die and press kit- It
included a saw and a sort of jig that could be lined up precisely
for the right cutting angle to saw the die. It also had a very
nice press and a few pieces of mild steel. I could not seem to
ever saw the dies out properly, and it took forever! I returned
that part of the kit, and kept the press. I think that someday,
I’ll find someone who will saw the dies for me. I think Rio will
still sell each part of the kit separately. Foxy

We had this conversation on ArtMetal once… Dave Shelton is
your man. I’ve never used him but people who have recommend him
most highly. 4207 Lead SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108 (505-256-7073).

Here is a good book: Ventilation- a Practical Guide for
Artists, Craftspeople, and Others in the Arts
by Nancy Clark,
Thomas Cutter, and Jean-Ann McGrane.Lyons & Burford, 1984.

-ieva swanson


#5

For blanking I use an 1 ton arbor press (bought at a local
machine tool store for aobut $75) that has been slightly modified
for about another $100 ( the ram is bored and threaded holes
added to the base). I then buy large circular disc punches form
IJS, Rio or Thunderbird for about $65. Then take them to a wire
EDM shop and have the shapes cut into the circular dies for about
$165 a piece including the male piece.

I know it may sound kinda expensive but if you blank out alot of
any one shape, this is a very economical way to do it, and allit
takes is a bit of arm power. I currently have about 30 different
shapes and sizes that I blank out. Hope this helps!!

Harry Butterfield
HP Trading Co.


#6

Anyone using a “kickpress”? I remember those from my days as a
jewelry designer.

Rick Hamilton

Richard D.
Hamilton,Jr.

Goldsmith

<http://www.rick-hamilton.com

@rick_hamilton


#7
Anyone using a "kickpress"? I remember those from my days as a
jewelry designer.

Haven’t used a kick press since the early '70s . Boy, that
brings me back… We used to blank out (among other items)
leaves, flowers, etc to solder onto pocket watch cases. We’d then
take the blank and set in in a steel engraved die and put it in
the drop hammer to form the top details. A drop hammer consists
of a (90 lb.) weight with about a 3 inch face that is suspended
between 2 rails, and connected to a six inch wide canvav strap.
The strap goes about 6 feet up and over a constantly rotating
(waxed) wooden drum and terminates at head level in a handle.
When you pull on the handle, the canvas strap tightens agains the
rotating wooden drum on top allowing you to lift the 90 pound
hammer head with about 5 lbs pressure. Some of the ring dies
dated back to the twenties when you stamped out the ring in
halves and a separate top then solderd them together. Yeah, the
old days… Any other old timers around here?


#8

I’ve used Dave for blanking in copper. ( I HATE cutting copper).
He does a great inexpensive job in a timely manner. Wendy Newman
goldsmith / designer Newport News, VA


#9

I’ve used Dave for blanking in copper. ( I HATE cutting copper).
He does a great inexpensive job in a timely manner. Wendy Newman
goldsmith / designer Newport News, VA

Good to know, Wendy, one of my associates needs to blank out
copper shapes for a project- what would be the approximate cost,
say for 20 pieces?

Rick Hamilton
Richard D. Hamilton, Jr
http://rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton