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"Black Metal"


#1

Hi all,

A friend has commissioned me to make a ring based on one he saw
recently. He claims it had two metals to it, silver and black.
And so, I sat down and researched through my books. I already
knew about Niello, which unfortunately has lead, and sort of
about Shakudo with a patina of rokusho. In my reading, I came to
the conclusion that Niello would have a much deeper colour, while
Shakudo would probably be less toxic. If I were to do Niello,
would it be okay to do it outside? And, since it is a ring, I
read that you could use a gum (would something like KlyrFire be
okay?), but you’d have to do it in a kiln and keep the piece
rotating constantly so the Niello doesn’t flow out. Stupid
question, how the heck would one do that? And, if I was to do
Shakudo, would it be good enough to get the Reactive Metals
shakudo and their so called “Baldwin’s Patina”, or should I do
the traditional rokusho patina?

Many questions, I know. I missed out on learning how to do
Niello because my school decided that year that it was too toxic
to continue teaching. One last question: ummm, what about plain
old Jax? Thanks everyone!

Tobey Robinson
Adoremus Creations in Metal
Burnaby, BC, Canada
ICQ: 2643004


#2
And, if I was to do

Shakudo, would it be good enough to get the Reactive Metals
shakudo and their so called “Baldwin’s Patina”, or should I do
the traditional rokusho patina?

Tobey, while Reactive Metals materials are great (I’ve just bought
a whole load of stuff rom them and their service is great too) I
would just make my own Shakudo: 60 parts of Cu to 40 parts of Ag.
Melt the copper and add the silver to it. Make sure it is well
blended (using a quartz rod) and pour the ingot. It appears very
silver after quenching and pickling, but this is superficial.

In my experience, however, Rokusho doesn’t make it very black. I
suspect that the ‘Baldwin’s Patina’ would be better.

I’ve never used Niello, but it’s one of those techniques that I’ve
been wanting to try for ages.

Yours aye, – Dauvit Alexander, Glasgow, Scotland.


#3

It is possible that the black metal is niobium- it takes a very
nice heat treated black oxide. I have been using niobium to make
wedding bands for years. (Niobium is named after Niobe, the
goddess of grief :). I fabricate a gold alloy tube that fits
inside a seamless tubing band of niobium, and solder two gold
rims on the sides.

Rick Hamilton

Richard D. Hamilton
A goldsmith on Martha’s Vineyard
USA
Fabricated 14k, 18k, 22k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography,
and sailing whenever I can…
http://www.rick-hamilton.com


#4

How about true cobalt based or better rhodium base god the luster
and ping when hit w/ a spoon? WoW. And, it only has to be microns
thick once you have your surface prep’d and a nice finsh to blast.


#5

Dauvit, Shakudo is a copper gold alloy, 95% copper 5% gold is a
common recipe. The alloy you describe is Shibuichi which translates
as “three quarters” and is typically 75% silver 25% silver it will
not patina black in Rokusho. Only shakudo will patina black in with
rokusho if you do it right it is a difficult patina to do but is a
nice black with purple undertones from the gold.

Jim


@jbin
James Binnion Metal Arts
2916 Chapman St
Oakland, CA 94601
510-436-3552


#6
    It is possible that the black metal is niobium- it takes a
very nice heat treated black oxide. I have been using niobium to
make wedding bands for years. (Niobium is named after Niobe, the
goddess of grief :)

Whaat. Nice irony there. Actually I thought she was ‘just’ the
sister of Titus.

 . I fabricate a  gold alloy tube that fits inside a seamless
tubing band of niobium, and solder two gold rims on the sides.

And it gets the black oxide finish at the same time? great idea.

A goldsmith on Martha’s Vineyard

Is this what Bob sang about in ‘I don’ wanna work on Maggie’s
Farm’? :wink:

Brian
B r i a n � A d a m J e w e l l e r y E y e w e a r �
@Brian_Adam1 ph/fx +64 9 817 6816 NEW ZEALAND
http://www.adam.co.nz/eyewear/
http://www.adam.co.nz/jewellery/
http://www.adam.co.nz/workshop/ LAST ONE - Queenstown Mar11 to Mar18 '98
http://www.adam.co.nz/ruthbaird/ across the bench from me


#7

Is it possible that this ring was a lamination of copper and fine
silver, like mokume gane, treated with liver of sulphur?

Lee From sunny Phoenix


#8

Jim,

Would you describe how you attaian your patina on shakudo? I
have been trying various methods. What do you do?

Thanks!
Karen
karen@carvedbyramsey.com


#9
The alloy you describe is Shibuichi which translates
as "three quarters" and is typically 75% silver 25% silver 

Uhhh … I don’t mean to be picky here, but is this a typo??
Which part is silver, and what is the other part? Thanks!

Marrin Fleet
@Marrin_and_Mary_Dell
Memphis, Tennessee, USA
(About halfway between the Gulf of Mexico
and Canada, on the Mississippi River;
home of Elvis and W.C.Handy)


#10
The alloy you describe is Shibuichi which translates
as "three quarters" and is typically 75% silver 25% silver

Uhhh … I don’t mean to be picky here, but is this a typo??
Which part is silver, and what is the other part? Thanks!

Oops :frowning: 75% silver 25% copper

Jim


@jbin
James Binnion Metal Arts
2916 Chapman St
Oakland, CA 94601
510-436-3552