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Black diamond?


#1

As a non precious stone person, I would like to know what in the
world is a black diamond?

Marilyn Smith


#2

Black diamond is industrial grit that some clever marketer has
convinced people to buy in jewelry.

Elaine Luther


#3

Marilyn: A black Diamond is just that it is a stone made of carbon
that is black, similar to Blue, Pink, Green, Champagne, Commercial
Browns, and the myriad of other colored Diamonds which normally are
referred to as fancy colored Diamonds, how ever I personally find
nothing fancy about a very hard chunk of coal that happened to be
exceptionally hard, brittle and ugly as home made sin. But QVC and
Home Shopping Network, sold millions of dollars worth of them as a
valuable gem set in their highly detailed settings, along with a few
pieces of frozen spit I’m sorry I meant to say Diamonds. These would
have fulfilled a much more meaningful existence on the end of a rock
drill drilling for Petroleum deposits in the Arctic wilderness. (yeah
right)

Kenneth Ferrell
www.shadras.com


#4

A black diamond is a diamond that has so much black carbon
inclusions in it that it appears to be black. They are available
both naturally colored and irradiated. I’ve sold them, but
personally find them to be about as ugly as a stone can get.

Daniel R. Spirer, GG Spirer Somes Jewelers 1794 Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA 02140 617-491-6000 @spirersomes
www.spirersomes.com


#5

I don’t know about but ‘black diamonds’ is an old term
used in the UK for coal, and dates from the start of the industrial
revolution when pit owners made their fortunes from coal mining. I’d
like to know the answer with respect to gemstones though.

Pat Waddington


#6

It is a diamond that has been treated to make it black. Looks
almost like black onyx, but more translucent. The store I work in
sells quite a few. They do occur naturally, too, I believe, but these
are all treated. I believe it is a radiation treatement. I also
believe that heating (as in retipping) can cause them to lose the
black. Usually these are pretty ugly stones by themselves, to the
black is an improvement if you care for them. Personally, I don’t see
the point. I can get the same effect with a cheap black onyx as I
can with a much more costly black diamond, but that is just my
opinion. Jim


#7

Hi Marilyn,

As a non precious stone person,  I would like to know what in the
world is a black diamond? 

Just that, a diamond that appears black. Actually according to an
article in the last issue of GIA’s Gems & Gemology, the color really
isn’t black, but a very dark brown/green. Examination under a
microscope will reveal that the color is imparted by many very
small inclusions. The stones are usually faceted when used in
jewelry.

Dave


#8
    As a non precious stone person,  I would like to know what in
the world is a black diamond? 

I was fortunate that in one meeting with a Belgium diamond dealer, I
was able to see a large collection of black diamonds. They are
completely opaque, and cut with a flat back and very large table
facet, much like a faceted “black onyx”. While they seem to be
gaining in popularity and quite attractive, I could not convince
myself to purchase any.

Jeffrey Everett


#9
       I was fortunate that in one meeting with a Belgium diamond
dealer, I was able to see a large collection of black diamonds.
They are completely opaque, and cut with a flat back and very large
table facet, much like a faceted "black onyx". While they seem to
be gaining in popularity and quite attractive, I could not convince
myself to purchase any. 

Jeffery, Though a flat back certainly makes sense since these things
are opaque, all of the ones I’ve had to work with, including lots of
melee to be pave set, were normal brilliant cuts. Also it’s worth
mentioning that most of what’s on the market in these, are the result
of, I believe, irradiation/heat treating, rather than fully natural.
The fully natural ones are just cut from diamonds which are so full
of the typical “carbon” inclusions or other dark inclusions as to
appear opaque and black. I’m not sure what the treated ones start
out looking like…

Peter


#10

Drill bit comes to mind every time I see black diamonds. Consumers
will buy anything if marketed to properly. What was the saying…The
proper tool for the proper job? Yup, drill bit jewelry! The makers of
drill bits found a new way to market their drills.

Oops thought this was the jokes thread…


#11

I have some black melee memoed to me by my diamond dealer. They are
facetted the same as a round brilliant–complete with pavillion. I
have heard that they are quite brittle when setting and, indeed,
several girdles are chipped in the parcel.

In the past, when I have used them, I had one experience where the
stone table was fogged after soldering-- having taken all normal
precautions. They seem to be slightly different animals.

Andy


#12

I’ve decided that I don’t want any black diamonds, thank you very
much I will know what someone might be talking about who
might be bragging about owning one.

thanks,
Marilyn Smith


#13

Hi Peter

I saw the collection back in the late 80s. The stones were quite
attractive if you like flat highly reflective black opaque faceted
tablet style stones . I think they were quite new as a product in
Belgium. This dealer in particular told me there could be quite a
market in one wanted to develop it. There were only flat stones in
his collection, and none smaller than about 6 mm square, although he
did mention he was considering setting up to cut them into smaller
squares for channel setting. I don’t remember any talk of irradiation
or of them being natural. We may have discussed it, I just don’t
remember.

Jeffrey Everett


#14

Here in Ketchikan, Alaska, with three quarters of a million cruise
ship passengers each year, less than 14,000 residents, 40 jewelry
stores and even more curio shops, “Alaskan Black Diamond” jewelry is
a popular souvenir.

Real black diamonds? Nope, it is a marketing name for cheap hematite
jewelry made who knows where.


#15

Hey, Abo-

And now ,the $64,000 question-

Does the faceted hematite look better or worse than the "genuine"
black diamonds?

Lee Einer
Dos Manos Jewelry
http://www.dosmanosjewelry.com


#16
    Does the faceted hematite look better or worse than the
"genuine" black diamonds? 

Black diamonds have razor sharp facet junctions and retain them
longer than anything else.


#17

Poor, sad, “caught the short bus to school” Black Diamond!

I use them for the stunning luster. They are relatively cheap -
under $50 a carat usually.

Tony Konrath
Key West Florida 33040


#18

I buy stones based on their “oh, boy” ( better known as the “wow”
) factor. i don’t buy only on the basis of cost or because of name
desirability. I buy because a particular stone is inspiring /
effective. I have a small strand of faceted black diamond beads…
and they are so scintillating you can take your eyes off of them!
I tried not to buy them! They were expensive and they have
horrifyingly tiny holes, but I found that I couldn’t put them down,
and everyone I’ve shown them to has had the same reaction. That is
a reaction to be wished for. It may be some time before I use them,
but they are fabulous no matter how you think of them…glorified
drill bit rough or whatever. Marianne


#19

And they have a remarkable polish!

Jeffrey Everett