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Bilberry Berry Extract Eye Care


#1

Hi Folks:

I followed a recent thread about eye care with interest. I am 48 and
am already using 2.5 magnification for everyday reading. For my
jewelry work I use 4 to 6 with 10 for close up work. I had perfect
vision till I hit 40 :-). My question is: I bought a product called
OcuGuard from Twinlab at GNC. Amongst other things, a daily dose
contains 10mg of Bilberry Berry Extract and 20,000 mcg of Lutein.
What’s the difference between mg and mcg? When I look at other
products (from Swanson’s catalog) that are just Bilberry, I see that
the mg is much much higher. Am I taking enough Bilberry at 10 mg’s a
day to make a difference? Is the Lutein too high? Should I buy
separate products or stick with one complete (less pills is nice).
Does anyone have experience with the quality of Swanson’s products. I
know they are cheaper and sometimes that worries me that I’m getting
an inferior product. I appreciate the help. Thank you!

Debbie Parent


#2
What's the difference between mg and mcg? When I look at other
products (from Swanson's catalog) that are just Bilberry, I see
that the mg is much much higher. Am I taking enough Bilberry at 10
mg's a day to make a difference? Is the Lutein too high? 

A mcg-- microgram-- is 1/1000 of a miligram, so, no, the lutein
isn’t too high. You can safely consume quite a lot of lutein–
certainly several mg (not mcg)-- it is plentiful in green leafy
vegetables and tomatoes. On the other hand, though there is evidence
that it may help prevent/slow macular degeneration, it is not clear
that it will do anything for acuity.

Billberry is reputed to help night vision and recovery from glare. I
have just started tyaking it myself, as I now have trouble at night,
but it is too soon to say whether/how much it will help. Most of the
preparations claim 80mg per capsule, and recommend 2 capsules 1-3
times per day, so I’d say your stuff is unlikely to do you any good
at all.

Noel


#3

Dear Debbie,

What's the difference between mg and mcg? 

mg is milligrams and mcg is micrograms. A microgram is one thousandth
of a milligram, or there are a thousand micrograms in a milligram.

Helen Hill
Preston, UK


#4

The “mcg” label is an English-alphabet way of abbreviating
microgram. So, your 20,000 mcg of lutein is 20 mg. I suppose 20,000
mcg seems more impressive.

When I look at other products (from Swanson's catalog) that are
just Bilberry, I see that the mg is much much higher. Am I taking
enough Bilberry at 10 mg's a day to make a difference? Is the
Lutein too high? 

There no official recommended dosage, since recent studies of
bilberry have shown no effect on vision. However, it’s generally good
for you, like other foods with lots of anti-oxidants (personally, I
prefer chocolate), and the German government has approved it for
diarrhea :slight_smile:

An interesting story on the bilberry legend:
http://www.webmd.com/balance/features/bilberry-bombs

Has anyone here asked their optometrist his opinion of bilberry?

Al Balmer
Sun City, AZ


#5
10mg of Bilberry Berry Extract and 20,000 mcg of Lutein. What's the
difference between mg and mcg? 

Hi, Debbie. mg is milligram - 1,000 of a gram. mcg is microgram -
1,000,000 of a gram. 20,000 mcg of something is 20 mg, but the
standard dosages are expressed in mcg, in this case, so they don’t
convert the weights - that’s doctor stuff and pharmacology. As far
as the rest - IMO anybody who dispenses medical advise without a
license should be in jail…But that’s just me…

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#6

To second fully what John has said, about medical or opthamological
advice, I would just like to add that bilberry, hawthorne berry,
liqourice root, white willow bark and many herbal remedies and
products are not safe for people with high blood pressure and heart
disease. I have an extensive background in medicine and botany
(among other degrees, from another lifetime removed from
jewelrymaking which is far less stressful and requires far less
annual malpractice insurance!..though jewelry making still “comes
home” with me at night!)

R.E.Rourke


#7

I do my work with one eye and a combination of a corneal transplant,
hard contact lense, reading glasses and my optivisor. Takes all of
this to see enough to work, but there is no depth perception (cutting
a wire is sometimes a real chase) and tying Loren’s ring was hard.

You can’t afford to take any chances - a good opthamologist can be
your best friend (mine sure is). I guess it is good to try to enhance
your vision with whatever concoction the supplement industry comes up
with, but not without the advise of your doctor. Supplements do not
have to go through FDA approval. Just be careful what ever you do.

Louise
http://www.jewelryspectrum.com


#8

Hi Debbie,

The focus problem you describe sounds entirely normal. Just use
whatever visual aids work for you in each situation.

There is no known relationship between that problem (presbyopia) and
common nutritional factors, but there is a definite nutritional
effect on the development and progression of macular degeneration.
Bilberry is essentially the same as blueberry and fresh may be even
more desirable than abstracts in a capsule. A milligram (mg.) is one
thousandth of a gram while a microgram (mcg.) is one millionth of a
gram. I don’t know of any comparing the content and
efficacy of various manufacturers of nutritional supplements.

Use your various magnifiers and enjoy your work!

Dr. Mac


#9

Botanical names: Vaccinium myrtillus

Parts used: Ripe berries, leaves

A close relative of American blueberry, bilberry grows in northern
Europe a nd North America. The ripe berries are primarily used in
modern herbal extr acts.

Major constituents: Anthocyanosides

How does it work?

Anthocyanosides, the flavonoid complex in bilberries, are potent
antioxidan ts. They support normal formation of connective tissue and
strengthen capil laries in the body. Anthocyanosides may also improve
capillary and venous b lood flow. They also speed the regeneration of
rhodopsin, the purple pigmen t used by the rods in the eye for night
vision.

Key uses for bilberry: None

Other potential uses for bilberry

Diabetes: Bilberry may lower the risk of some diabetic
complications, such as diabetic cataracts and retinopathy. One
preliminary trial found that sup plementation with a standardized
extract of bilberry improved signs of reti nal damage in some people
with diabetic retinopathy. Retinopathy: Preliminary human studies
conducted in Europe show that bilber ry may be useful in treating
mild retinopathies (such as macular degenerati on and diabetic
retinopathy). How much is usually taken? Bilberry herbal extract in
capsules or tablets standardized to provide 25% anthocyanosides can
be taken in the amount of 240 to 600 mg per day. Traditional use is 1
to 2 ml two times per day in tincture form or 20 to 60 grams of the
fruit daily. Are there any side effects or precautions? In recommended
amounts, no side effects have been reported with bilberry ex tract.
Potential adverse drug interactions None reported