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Bezel punches


#1

Hello everyone,

Has anyone used bezel punches? What gauge metal should be used?

Thank you.
Sharon Sawyer


#2

Sharon

Has anyone used bezel punches? What gauge metal should be used? 
https://orchid.ganoksin.com/t/bezel-punch

is the start of just such a discussion from the usage stand point,
as far as thickness of the metal. Here is a link to a thread that was
fairly long on the subject and you may find value in it

https://orchid.ganoksin.com/t/bezel-thickness-for-opals

and you might find value in this one too, as it is an inspection
process for set stones which also covers the thickness of the bezel.

professionaljeweler.com/archives/articles/1998/aug98/0898fys1.html

Additionally there is this link to Hoover and Strong on the subject
of bezels.

http://www.hooverandstrong.com/articles/?id=30

Sorry I could not give a specific answer.

Terry


#3

Is there a simple chart that tells millimeter lenth to fit that
stone without trying to look up the mathamatical equation? Say for a
10xx8 Oval you would use 24ga material and what length? Does any
body have a chart that they could send to ganoskin or recomend a
book on all shapes in order to fabricate the settings with prongs.
Ihave used the bezel mandrels for years and would like the mm of the
wire used. While im thinking of it,is there a chart that measures the
invevestment in ounces with milliters. Make it simple please.

thanks Eric


#4
"Is there a simple chart that tells millimeter lenth to fit that
stone without trying to look up the mathamatical equation? Say for
a 10xx8 Oval you would use 24ga material and what length?" 

The equation is not exactly higher math and if you have a hand held
calculator it’s easier than looking it up in a table anyway.
Basically it is diameter plus bezel material thickness (in
milimeters) times pi (3.1416). In your example you add length and
width, (10+8 =18) divide by 2 (9) add.508 (that’s 24 ga. coverted to
millimeters) and multiply by 3.1416 to get 29.87. Trying to set up a
table would,( IMHO) be impractical for several reasons. First it
would only work for accurately calibrated stones. Even the calibrated
one’s measurements can vary slightly so you would have to check with
a Leveridge guage or something similar anyway. Same thing with the
bezel thickness unless you use only commercially rolled material.
Given that you have to measure in any event, the calculation only
takes a few seconds.

Jerry in Kodiak


#5

Hello Eric

Is there a simple chart that tells millimeter lenth to fit that
stone without trying to look up the mathamatical equation?" 

Just wrap the bezel around the stone and cut it where it overlaps
the end. Then the bezel wire is cut to the size needed without having
to measure with a ruler.

Regards
Karen Bahr - Karen’s Artworx
Calgary, Alberta, Canada


#6

Over the years, I have accumulated a collection of bezel blocks and
punches. I usually use either 18 gauge sheet or heavy wall tubing to
make the bezel. If the bezel is not round or oval, I form a blank of
the proper shape out of sheet. I anneal the piece after forming and
soldering it, and make it about 75% of the finished size. I punch the
bezel in stages, annealing after each stage. The top 1/3 of the bezel
stretches, the lower 1/3 compresses. If the bezel block has openings
with corners, triangle, pear, marquis, etc. I shape the blank
accordingly and exercise more care in the punching and annealing
process. Sometimes I will make it first in sterling silver, to make
sure I have the size and shape right, or if I am making a model for
casting later on.

Rick Hamilton