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Best rubberized abrasive wheel for the dollar?


#1

All,

I absolutely LOVE how well Silicone Softies (artificial rubberized
abrasive shapes) polish silver. But I don’t like how fast they wear
out, either, or their cost!

Does anyone regularly use a more economical (either wears out slower,
or better unit price) abrasive shape?

Thanks in advance,
Andrew Jonathan Fine


#2

The best rubberized abrasive is none at all. For general work, learn
how to roll emery paper. Much cheaper, and more versatile, and don’t
overheat. That said, I do use rubber pencil points, for fine details.
For stone setting, I use pumice wheels.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#3

My favorite rubberized wheel is Swifty’s One-Step for precious
metals. Swifty has an entire line, but the One-Step is the only one
that I can vouch for. I’ve tried lots of others, but always return
to the One-Step, for both price and results. I get them from

Jamie


#4
Does anyone regularly use a more economical (either wears out
slower, or better unit price) abrasive shape? 

I have moved to and been using the Titan line of rubberized abrasive
that Rio Grande carries. Its geared for for Stainless and Titanium,
but will work on other metals. They have good wear resistance, can be
shaped with diamond files and come in a couple of grits.

Compared to other rubberized abrasives, these definatley last a lot
longer, by that I mean they dont break down as fast. The only down
side you may find is the limited shapes and they are more expensive.

Also, if you try these and start to shape them with a diamond file,
at the very least use a dust mask, personally I use a cartridge type
respirator when using these since they do get abused on stainless and
titanium.

Titan Abrasive on the Rio Grande website.
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/riotitanabrasive

Good luck,
P@
www.patpruitt.com


#5
The best rubberized abrasive is none at all. For general work,
learn how to roll emery paper. Much cheaper, and more versatile,
and don't overheat. That said, I do use rubber pencil points, for
fine details. For stone setting, I use pumice wheels. 

Yeah, pretty much my rubber wheels tend to petrify and fossilize
before I finish a pack. And it’s because of my emery rolls on split
mandrels do about 80-90% or more of my flex-shaft metal surface
work.

Also, those 3M Bristle brushes that it took me years to buy, they’re
wonderful! SOMETIMES. But I’m afraid they might go bad too while
they wait for me to need them.

For the money, a roll of emery paper on a split mandrel is about 20
cents including binding wire to hold it in place and 1-2 of them
does about as much work as my average rubber wheel. So how much are
your wheels costing you?

Ray Brown


#6
For the money, a roll of emery paper on a split mandrel is about
20 cents including binding wire to hold it in place 

Is this the same as a “sandpaper flapper” (on a flex shaft)?


#7
For the money, a roll of emery paper on a split mandrel is about 20
cents including binding wire to hold it in place Is this the same
as a "sandpaper flapper" (on a flex shaft)? 

Same concept, but a roll is about 8 inches wrapped around a split
mandrel and bound at the base with wire or rubber bands. It’s then
torn off one layer at a time as it wears out. I make my rolls about
an inch and a qtr tall, but can be taller or shorter as you like. A
flapper is a small piece stuck in a split mandrel for small areas,
and is replaced when worn out rather than peeled as an onion (sort
of).

Ray Brown