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[BenchTube] Making love knot ring


#1

Now showing at the BenchTube

Making love knot ring
Runtime: 12m 42s

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#2
http://www.ganoksin.com/benchtube/video/857/Making-love-knot-ring 

Hi some comments on this very commonly made ring

Metal would have been better if 1.5 mm, it would be stronger for a
man 2 mm would be good.

Too much metal wasted, not need to cut off so much metal

Too many solders

Ring not evenly round, knot should have been hammered, to make back
of knot smooth. Also if this was done there would have been no need to
solder knot together as the metal on back of knot would have “bitten
into” itself on the back of the ring and so not slide apart. Also
inside of ring would have been smooth.

Back of bands not soldered together, so will come apart with wear
over the years. A quick google of this ring shows the two bands
soldered together and many are fully round.

This is a ring that has been made for decades if not centuries. It
can be made with fewer steps and made round.

Still the video shows a process that can be improved, but
instructive in its own way.

Just some observations

all the best
Richard


#3
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep81ad 

Just for the sake of accuracy, the ring being made in this video is
a square knot. It is not a reef knot, nor is it a love or lover’s
knot. A reef knot is similar in that it is a square knot in which
the bitter end is doubledand passed through the bight so that it can
be opened in an instant when shaking out a reef in a sail. The
lover’s knot has a couple of different manifestations, but the most
common is simply two interlocking half hitches.

Jerry in Kodiak (who swallowed the anchor and became a metalsmith)


#4
Just for the sake of accuracy, the ring being made in this video
is a square knot. It is not a reef knot, nor is it a love or
lover's knot. A reef knot is similar in that it is a square knot in
which the bitter end is doubledand passed through the bight so that
it can be opened in an instant when shaking out a reef in a sail.
The lover's knot has a couple of different manifestations, but the
most common is simply two interlocking half hitches. 

FWIW, a reef knot and a square knot are the same. What you described
as a reef knot is a single-slipped reef knot.

A reef knot, or square knot if you prefer, was traditionally used
for reefing sails because it is an insecure knot. When either free
end is given a sharp tug the knot will capsize into a larkshead on a
line, which quickly slips free.

There is no especial utility for making a single-slipped reef knot
to take up sail. Indeed it could be argued that it wastes time. If
you pull the free end of the slip you are still left with a simple
overhand knot in the line which must then be undone, although it is
likely to open under the weight of the sail. If you capsize a reef
knot the weight of the sail will slip the resulting hitch open.

Classically the knot is called a Knot of Herakles.

The true lovers’ knot I’ve always used is a pair of simple overhand
knots linked through their central bights. Which is similar to what
you describe, though I’ve never seen it made with half hitches.

Elliot Nesterman