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Beauty of firescale


#1

All,

I know that firescale is considered to be undesirable and something
to be removed, but has anyone made firescale as part of the design? I
finished casting this ring recently, and in the recessed areas I was
wanting a dark grayish very low gloss surface. In a case like this
would simply leaving the firescale be okay? or are there stability
problems or other issues with leaving firescale around?

Thanks.
Seech


#2
but has anyone made firescale as part of the design?

Yes, for sure Georg Jensen.
http://www.georgjensen.com/global/Designers/Georg-Jensen.aspx

You won’t be able to see it on the photos though.


#3

Firescale is basically an oxidation of the surface and can be very
attractive. The problem is the oxide layer is very thin and often
difficult to control. If you look at old guns or swords they are
often finished with a beautiful and controlled oxidation, commonly by
case hardening or hot bluing. This has several advantages other than
attractiveness. It shows that the piece has been hardened and in the
case of a sword, tempred as well and the finish give an barrier
against corrosion. Titanium and niobium are nearly always anodised
to attracive colouyrs rather than letting the piece oxidise as it
wants to anyway. It will be the customer who decides as to whether
your own predelictions are commercially acceptable.

Nick Royall


#4
Fire scale is basically an oxidation of the surface and can be
very attractive. The problem is the oxide layer is very thin and
often difficult to control. If you look at old guns or swords they
are often finished with a beautiful and controlled oxidation,
commonly by case hardening or hot bluing. This has several
advantages other than attractiveness. It shows that the piece has
been hardened and in the case of a sword, tempred as well and the
finish give an barrier against corrosion. 

Very interesting Nick,

I’d like to hear a little more about how an oxide layer can tell you
that a sword is tempered? Sure you can apply a torch to a blade and
watch colours run, but this is a long way off what I’d call fire
scale (maybe fire staining is a better term?).

The swords I make are either pattern welded or polished, I’d never
leave a functional sword in a coloured tempered state. I haven’t seen
every sword there is, so if you could point me to an example of what
you’re describing that would be appreciated.

Regards Charles A.