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Bad solder


#1

I got some hard 18k gold solder from Hoover & Strong that seems to be
really bad. It’s melting temperature appears to be the same as the
18k gold that I’m using. I’ve stopped using it, as it’s a disaster.
Any suggestions on where I can get better 18K solder?

Virginia Lyons


#2

Have you discussed this with Hoover and Strong? I’m sure they will
want to hear what is happening.

-k


#3

Virginia, Have you contacted Hoover and Strong about the solder?.
Perhaps they sent you some solder that was incorrectly labeled. in
which case they should make good on it. At any rate, they should be
informed about the problems you are having. - Alma


#4

Hello Verginia, I’m using some 18k yellow hard solder from Stuller
800-877-7777 It works very well.

Tim
TAH Handcrafted Jewelry
web-site: http://www.home.earthlink.net/~tahhandcraft
e-mail: @Timothy_A_Hansen


#5

I would send it back and ask them for another piece to replace it.
We use Hoover’s 18k solder all the time and never have any problems
with it. It might have been a bad batch.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Spirer Somes Jewelers
@spirersomes
www.spirersomes.com


#6
    I got some hard 18k gold solder from Hoover & Strong that seems
to be really bad. It's melting temperature appears to be the same as
the 18k gold that I'm using. 

I’ve used Hoover’s 18K solder for 30+ years without a problem. If you
send it back, they will give you a credit. Perhaps you need an easier
solder for your particular alloy?


#7
 I got some hard 18k gold solder from Hoover & Strong that seems to
be really bad. 

Hoover & Strong is a very reputable company and, if it really is bad
solder, you should call them to discuss the problem. Talk to one of
their technical people. Perhaps there’s something about the product
that you’re unaware of or perhaps they just had a bad day.

Beth


#8
    I got some hard 18k gold solder from Hoover & Strong that seems
to be really bad. It's melting temperature appears to be the same as
the 18k gold that I'm using. I've stopped using it, as it's a
disaster. Any suggestions on where I can get better 18K solder? 

Try “AAA Precious Metals,INC.” out of Portland Oregon, cadium free
too… 1-800-356-1423 been in business since 1955, also refines your
gold dust and bench sweeps ect… make sure you get the 18K plumb
yellow or white.


#9

Virginia - It is probably a good idea to buy your solder from the
same refiner you buy your gold stock. It would be formulated to be
used with the specific alloys they are selling. I use Hoover & Strong
solders and have never had a problem. I also buy all of my mill
products from them. If you look in most metal supply catalogs they
will list the melting points and flow points of their solders.

Steven Brixner - Jewelry Designer - San Diego CA USA
mailto:@Steven_Brixner4
http://www.brixnerdesign.com


#10

Hey Virginia, I have a whole pile of bum hard solder. One time I had
300 pieces of 18 K gold to solder and turns out the pieces were
melting before the solder would flow. Sounds like maybe your pieces
are thin and the hard solder is more an application for like ring
shanks. My brother mixes 24k filings with the hard solder and it
works for him. I tell ya the solder will not flow and is will just
slump so plan accordingly. I ended up sending my hard solder back and
the solder makers were very concerned to get it back and they
replaced it with softer solder. Oh have I had the problem.


#11

Virginia, The solder isn’t bad. I know of several jewelers who have
had a similar problem. To me, it seems that Hoover’s solder flows at
a temperature that is close enough to the melting point of some 18
karat gold alloys that is difficult to work with. This is especially
true if you are trying to solder on castings. The reason? Casters
need an alloy that will flow at a lower temps, allowing them to use
lower flask temps and generally giving them a lower viscosity. And,
some alloys are just lower melting than others. You generally don’t
have as much of a problem with an alloy that is designed for
fabrication because a low viscosity/melting point is not a factor.

For this reason I advise you to find a solder that has a melting
point that is more appropriate for the gold you are using. That may
mean using a hard solder from another company (I have used Stuller’s
hard solder and find it to be pretty consistent) or using medium
solder.

Hope this is helpful.

Larry Seiger


#12

Hello Virginia, I have had this same problem some years ago with soft
670 degrees Celsius solder 14 from Degussa. It had a melting point
like hard solder( 800 degrees Celsius). I have send it back and they
confirmed that there where copper oxides in the solder. Thes raise the
melting temperature. I got a new piece. I think you should do the
same. Or try to melt a little piece of this solder with some other
good 18 hard solder on a piece of steel,. and look if the melting
points are the same. If this is so than you should solder with a
softer flame, so that you object is not heated up so much.

Good luck

Martin Niemeijer


#13

Have you thought that maybe it could be the 18kt gold and its alloy
in the piece that you are working on? Are you using 18kt hard solder?
Possibly th e alloy that makes up the 18kt in the piece that you are
working on melts at a

lower temperature or same as the soldering temperature. Large
companies suc h as Hoover and Strong have a very strict quality control
system. Not that anyone or company is infallible, but more likely is
the case that the manufacturer of the 18kt piece that you re working
on used a substandard alloys. Try using 18kt easy solder. You will
probably find it easier to control on your piece and unlike 14kt easy,
may not have problems with pitting in your solder seam. Regards, Amber
Gustafson


#14

Would suggest the company Argen as a possible alternate source for
solders and precious alloys. The company specialises in dental alloys
etc. The website is www.argen.com I have had dealings with the above
company and can recommend them.

Ed. Wocke.