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Artificial Gas?


#1

I am in the process of setting up a studio after a 35 year hiatus.

I’ve got everything but the torch.

I’m interested in the Hoke-Jewel that uses Oxygen and Artificial Gas
as it has the pilot (I worked with one in Redondo Beach, California
back in 1973 and loved it!)

However - nobody can tell me what ‘Artificial Gas’ is or what kind
of a tank to use, or what kind of a regulator!

My other preference would be one of the old-style PrestoLite torches
with the control by the thumb and the pilot knob at the center of
the thumb control.

Does anybody have any idea where I could get the PrestoLite I’m
talking about? Or any about ‘Artificial Gas’?

I would be ever so grateful!
Bob


#2
    I'm interested in the Hoke-Jewel that uses Oxygen and
Artificial Gas 

Hello Bob;

My advice? Please don’t bother with the Hoke. Since it is now
manufactured in China, the only thing it has in common with Hoke
torches of the past is its external appearance. A useless piece of
junk now,and I believe it is being discontinued as well.

If you like that style of torch, try the Meco Midget (which might
also be discontinued now but still to be found). More expensive, but
it gives you the range of a (vintage) Hoke. I used to build
"ballerina" style mountings, some with over 100 solder joints in a
single ring. I used a Hoke, and I modified tips myself adding
smaller diameter tubing (before the kits with small tips were
available).

    Does anybody have any idea where I could get the PrestoLite
I'm talking about?  Or any about 'Artificial Gas'? 

You shouldn’t have trouble finding the PrestoLite. Try Rio Grande.
I can’t remember offhand, and my catalogs are in my office while I’m
working at home this evening, but check with Frei & Borel, and
Stuller too. It’s a widely distributed product, and I’ve seen
equivalent torch setups at local welding supply stores (at least they
could order them).

The most popular gas/oxy torch is probably the Little Torch, which
is a great torch. But there’s nothing between the number 7 tip and
their “rosebud” type melting tip so larger silver articles are a
problem. You could always buy an extra 7 and bore it out, I suppose.

David L. Huffman


#3
You shouldn't have trouble finding the PrestoLite.  Try Rio
Grande. I can't remember offhand, and my catalogs are in my office
while I'm working at home this evening, but check with Frei & Borel,
and Stuller too.  It's a widely distributed product, and I've seen
equivalent torch setups at local welding supply stores (at least
they could order them). 

A couple of other sources for Prestolite (acetyline/air) torches are
plumber’s suppliers & refrigeration suppliers. Just be careful not
to get the ‘Turbo Torch’. It works great for larger items used in
these trades, but the tip selection is lousy.

Dave


#4

Re the PrestoLite; I don’t think Rio Grande handles them. Try
Indian Jewelry Supply.

Margaret
@Margaret_Malm2,
in Utah’s colorful Dixie


#5

If you have a local wielders supply, then you might try them.
Presto-Light is the same thing sold to plumbers for small acet.
tanks for doing plumbing.


#6

Most local welding supply stores sell the prestolite torch outfits.
Thats where I bought mine when I was 12 years (I’m 47 now) And
everytime I get my tanks filled I still see Prestolites on the
shelf. I dont use mine very much anymore, but it was a great
beginners torch. If you can master most soldering jobs with it , then
you’ll be a wizard with a newer more precise type, like a 'little torch’
or other varieties. Ed


#7
    Does anybody have any idea where I could get the PrestoLite
I'm talking about?  Or any about 'Artificial Gas'? 

If you have trouble finding PrestoLite torch look for the Uniweld
name. Same style torch and available at most welding supply stores
and online at Uniweld’s website.


#8
      Does anybody have any idea where I could get the PrestoLite
I'm talking about? 

Roger check out this URL and you will find a Prestolite setup (I
believe it’s what you are looking for). It this is not what you
need, sorry, just delete. I’m no chemist but I would guess that
artificial gas is just any gas other than natural gas and I would
think that would include acetylene, propane and butane. But I’m not
knowledgeable about those things, just my guess. Surely there is one
of the Crchidians who could define “artificial gas” . Kay

http://www.bartcotools.com/P31.html


#9

There is a manufactured gas from coke production sometimes called
’towns gas’ etc. It is distributed with or in place of natural gas.
The common gases used for gas welding aRe: gas source notes Natural
gas from your local utility piped in, lower heat LP (Propane)
barbeque tanks etc can be piped in, safety issues (heavier than air)
MAPP gas from welding supplier same as LP but hotter (maybe
artificial gas? (Man made)) Acetylene from welding supplier hot but
carbon in flame, dirty Hydrogen from water torch etc.Hot and clean
but special torch etc

Some of these are used primarily with oxygen. LP is a good choice as
it is readily available and can be used safely if common sense and
good safety discipline are practiced. Locate a good welding supplier
and they can set you up with the regulators, hoses supplies etc.
Acetylene regulators reportedly can be used with LP, so can "T"
grade hoses. But I think you will need adaptors to interconnect
everything if you go that route. Be careful in selecting your welding
supplier as many of the counter people are a bit too blas about some
safety issues in my experience. Get and read the little safety books
that will be available free at many suppliers.

Prestolite is the original brand name for the acetylene air torch
made by Linde. Linde has been sold several times and so the
Prestolite or similar is made by several mfgs. I think the latest is
ESAB. Do not get one of the Turbo or swirl air acetylene torches as
the force of the flame is too strong and it will push small pieces
around. Excellent for plumbing work however.

Dan Wellman


#10

I am not trying to knock anyone’s effort, but really I can not see
why anyone would recommend a source for a product that will cost
more than getting it elsewhere, more often than not for a
considerable amount. I have seen this on this list over and over with
a number of things. As for the Prestolite torch why would anyone get
that from www.bartcotools.com for $169 when you can get the very
exact thing for $125 at http://tsijeweltools.com . It gets better
than that depending on what you are shopping for, do you want a Smith
air/acetylene torch then compare http://www.pacificwelding.com to
the bartcotools price. As for that matter it should be no secret
that if you wanted a jewelers bench you will see at least a $45
difference for the same model from the same manufacture, and
sometimes depending on what you are looking at you will see more than
a $100 difference, occasionally several hundred. Granted most
suppliers have a deal on something but often their other things are
no deal at all. I can not speak for everyone on the list but I can
not afford to throw money down a toilet. To the guy looking for the
Prestolite torch I am very certain that it was Arizonatools that had
it (past tense) for $100. The bottom line is that it pays to shop
around and if you have time to watch the idiot box you have time to
look into these things unless you are in a position where money is no
object and you are insulated from the world the rest of us must deal
with, in which case I doubt you would make things. As for the guy
looking for the Prestolite torch why not save a few dollars, I am
sure with Christmas coming up you can find a use for that money you
otherwise would not have. On this we are talking about the same thing,
no difference other than price.


#11

I may have missed this info if it was already posted, I’ve been out
of circulation for a month or so. Thunderbird Supply in Albuquerque
and in Gallup has a uniweld? air/acetylene torch that is really nice
for only $78.00. It was my first torch 15 years ago and I still
use it for many jobs. That is also the one I have my beginning
students use, it isn’t quite as quick to melt metal as an
oxy/acetylene torch (IMO).

Mary Barnes Yakima, WA