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Art studio lighting


#1

If you were building an art studio what kind of lighting would you
use? There are so many options LED? florescent? Daylight? White
light?


#2
If you were building an art studio what kind of lighting would you
use? There are so many options LED? florescent? Daylight? White
light?

I’m exactly in the same boat I looking forward to some replies


#3
If you were building an art studio what kind of lighting would you
use? There are so many options LED? florescent? Daylight? White
light? 

The lighting industry has forced me, and I assume others, to
experiment with shop lighting. In my first shop I had one 100 W
incandescent bulb and a 2’ fluorescent tube in my polishing hood. As
my shop grew, I just added more incandescent bulbs on swing arms. I
also added some track lights and general fluorescent fixtures. In
time, the incandescent bulbs were replaced with CFLs. I have been
experimenting with small LED spots in areas where I really need to
see well such as inside my polishing hood, in my lapidary inspection
area, and where I do stone setting. I still use 5300k CFLS in my
photo area. I really like LEDs. I just yesterday went to COSTCO and
bought my second LED fluorescent replacement fixture. Please note
that the LED tubes that they sell will not replace tubes in all
older fluorescent fixtures, at least not in my shop. The interesting
thing to me about LEDs is that I can see firescale and other flaws
under LED lighting when I used to have to take a piece out into
indirect sunlight to see it, mark it with a sharpie and then go back
and remove it. Ravina, I am glad that you started this discussion. I
is one that I had hoped to see for a long time.

I am sure that others will share their experience. Rob


#4

Daylight bulbs. No Question.


#5

I relit my studio with all LEDs. It is wonderful.


#6

daylight # 1 and especially through an open window or outside so you
can get vitamin d at same time 150watt halogen #2, but don’t touch it
while its hot 250 watt incandescent # 3 the more light the less
optivisor, the better your close up vision for the future


#7

I use 5000k daylight LED lighting throughout our house and my
studio. Colorsunder this lighting are pretty much identical to what
you see outside. I can photograph anything inside using existing
lighting with very little Photoshop adjustment. I can also see tiny
little jewelry parts much better with daylight LED’s.

There are still a few fluorescent strip fixtures in the studio and I
can’t wait for them to be gone. We are in the process of replacing
them with LED recessed fixtures.

Diana
sohosouthimports.com


#8

I’ve been replacing all my shop CFLS with 100-watt Cree LED daylight
bulbs. I absolutely love them.

Jeff Herman


#9

I am a little confused.

I work in a workshop. I have a pair of 4’ fluorescent tubes over the
back of the bench and two 75watt incandescent cranes, one over each
shoulder. I have a knee switch that switches off the lamps for
annealing. And I have a south facing window to my left.

My confusion is in the question. Are we talking about an art
studio/gallery where Art is painted, sculpted, photographed and
displayed or a studio/workshop where work is done and various arts
and jewelry are made?

Sunlight is death overtime to paintings and photographs, fabric and
some collage work. I understand the need for a non damaging light
source for that space. And I understand the need for solid
illumination in the workshop.

I don’t mean to sound prickly on this but I have never understood
the distinction between a workshop and a studio. Is there a
definition? Thanks for the answer in advance.

Don Meixner


#10

Thank you, Rob Meixner, for mentioning that LED light will reveal
fire scalewell. I still use some standard sterling, and even at my
advanced age I am occasionally capable of overheating it. I would
prefer to see it at the polisher instead of having to step outside
my studio door!


#11

For general studio lighting I use fluorescent tubes except for the
fixture over my bench, that one was switched to LED tubes. For
specific lighting I am using LED bulbs. I used to use CFL’s in those
areas but since trying LED’s I slowly changed them all and will
never go back. When I get rich making jewelry I will replace all my
fluorescent tube lighting with LED…

Steve Wandt
NaturalGoldJewelry.com


#12

LED ~ great balanced lighting and an extra bonus is that they don’t
heat up the studio in the summer like the halogen!

Reba


#13

I remember an old Mother Jones article about lighting.

They put the fear of god into any bulb you would choose. Fluorescent
was especially bad in the article.

I like to use plant bulbs where ever they fit. The cost is a bit
more, but they are easy on the eye. Don’t have any statistics.

I still love the three bulb Dazor brand light for my workbench.

No debate here about what is best.

Kind regards,
Todd Hawkinson


#14

Hi Jeff,

Any florescent style bulb to recommend?

I’m putting new lighting in my basement workshop.

They need to fit the old four bulb fixture though.

Best regards,
Todd Hawkinson


#15
Any florescent style bulb to recommend? I'm putting new lighting in
my basement workshop. They need to fit the old four bulb fixture
though. 

“Four bulb fixture” is kind of vague. Do you mean a fixture with
four 4" fluorescent tubes? If so, I’d recommend the LED replacements.

Al Balmer


#16

I always liked lights which do not have either bluish or yellowish
tints, not just for work, but for general lighting as well. My
favorite light by far is halogen bounced off a white ceiling. The
best way to tell the color is by the Kelvin temp rating. Halogen is
around 3200K. What is the Kelvin of the LED lights so many of you
seem to favor?

Thanks,
Janet in Jerusalem


#17
If you were building an art studio what kind of lighting would you
use? There are so many options LED? florescent? Daylight? White
light? 

I’m exactly in the same boat I looking forward to some replies.


#18
If you were building an art studio what kind of lighting would you
use? There are so many options LED? florescent? Daylight? White
light? 

The lighting industry has forced me, and I assume others, to
experiment with shop lighting. In my first shop I had one 100 W
incandescent bulb and a 2’ fluorescent tube in my polishing hood. As
my shop grew, I just added more incandescent bulbs on swing arms. I
also added some track lights and general fluorescent fixtures. In
time, the incandescent bulbs were replaced with CFLs. I have been
experimenting with small LED spots in areas where I really need to
see well such as inside my polishing hood, in my lapidary inspection
area, and where I do stone setting. I still use 5300k CFLS in my
photo area. I really like LEDs. I just yesterday went to COSTCO and
bought my second LED fluorescent replacement fixture. Please note
that the LED tubes that they sell will not replace tubes in all
older fluorescent fixtures, at least not in my shop. The interesting
thing to me about LEDs is that I can see firescale and other flaws
under LED lighting when I used to have to take a piece out into
indirect sunlight to see it, mark it with a sharpie and then go back
and remove it. Ravina, I am glad that you started this discussion. I
is one that I had hoped to see for a long time.

I am sure that others will share their experience. Rob


#19

I just replace all fluorescents with 4ft ballast by-pass tubes from

A number of the ballasts in the fixtures were going bad, so it was
an ideal time to make the switch. It’s a very easy job to accomplish.
Depending on the fixtures you have, it may require replacing the
tombstones as well as removing the ballasts. More light with 3 18
watt 5k LED tubes than with 4 35 watt fluorescents. Instant on, no
humming, and the color response is much better. Reasonable price for
these when buying a case of 25$, As I mentioned, the wiring is a
simple deal. Much easier than changing out a ballast!

Best thoughts,
Robert Klander


#20

There are LED replacement tubes available. A small bit of work
bypassing orremoving the ballast is needed, but easy to do. Look at:
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep824t

Steve Wandt
NaturalGoldJewelry.com