Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

AMT flexshaft


#1

Fellow Orchans,

Does anyone have any experience with the AMT (American Machine &
Tool) flexshaft? I received their “Fall Discount” flyer
yesterday. They had a 1/4 HP, 0 -16000 rpm, with foot control
for $128. The handpiece has looks like it’s about the size of a

30 but requires 2 wrenches to tighten the collet(3 collets 1/8

  • 1/4"). The description of the replacement shaft says that it
    fits Foredom. There’s a 10 Year repair/replacement warranty.

This sounds like a good deal to me if they work well. (I have no
connection to AMT)

Has anyone used these?

Chunk


#2
The handpiece has looks like it's about the size of a # 30 but
requires 2 wrenches to tighten the collet

Hi Chunk,

Just my opinion, but I wouldn’t be interested if it requires two
wrenches to tighten the collet (and I imagine change
burrs/bits). One, or none would be much more desirable!

Dave
Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#3

Chunk:

With a 1/4 horse motor that thing is a hoss and might be good
for heavy work. However, I see some problems — it doesn’t go
quite as fast as a Foredom, and that might be an issue with
polishing with small wheels. The two wrenches on the collets
would get me, tho’. The collets are only useful for one size
burr, so if you have different sizes (as I do — and think
about using drills) you have the hassle of changing collets.
Then are you saying you have to tighten the collets each time
with wrenches? A real time waster. I have a #30 and I don’t like
fooling with the chuck key to tighten, wish I had the collet and
sleeve for quick changes, but they tell me that the #8 gets too
hot and there is the problem I mentioned with the collets only
fitting one size. I haven’t wanted to spring for the chuck key
with the handle on it, which is easier to use. Any comments,
guys? What do you use and how do you change quickly?


#4

Hi Jess,

Look into dental micro-motor handpieces. I have a Volvere 5
that I have been using constantly for about 11 years,
replacing only the collet and the connector cord occasionally.
You can get a splitter that will allow you to use 2 handpieces
from 1 controller and also you can have seperate nosecones for
the handpieces including angle heads. They are not cheap, but
they last and last. To change burrs you just rotate the lever,
change, and rotate back. It takes about 5 seconds.

Regards,

Skip

                                  Skip Meister
                                NRA Endowment and
                                   Instructor
                                @Skip_Meister
                                09/18/9700:57:53

#5

I cut a notch in a wood file handle and glued the key in place,
it makes it easier to work with, I like my # 30 as it will take
any size shank ( can be a bit slow when going from a small shank
to a large shank )


#6

Just my opinion, but I wouldn’t be interested if it requires two
wrenches to tighten the collet (and I imagine change
burrs/bits). One, or none would be much more desirable!

Thanks Dave, I was think along those lines and have been
thinking I would probably try a quick change hand piece from
foredom. What handpiece do you prefer. Are there disadvantages
to the quickchange ones?

Has this been discussed in the past?

Chunk


#7
 Then are you saying you have to tighten the collets each time
 with wrenches?  A real time waster. I have a #30 and I don't like
 fooling with the chuck key to tighten, wish I had the collet and
 sleeve for quick changes, but they tell me that the #8 gets too
 hot and there is the problem I mentioned with the collets only
 fitting one size.  I haven't wanted to spring for the chuck key
 with the handle on it, which is easier to use.  Any comments,
 guys?  What do you use and how do you change quickly?

I use a Faro with a rapid release lever. It runs cool. It only
has the 3/32" collet, but then I rarely use any other size bur.
If I’m using drills or anything other than 3/32" shafts I’ve got
the #30 Jacob’s chuck.

If you are thinking about getting another handpiece, I’d advise
you to get one with a duplex spring unless you do mostly heavier
work. I find it can take a lot of weight off your hand without
raising and lowering your motor. They break often (about once or
twice a year for me), but they replace easily.

Dick Caverly


#8

Then are you saying you have to tighten the collets each time
with wrenches? A real time waster. I have a #30 and I don’t like
fooling with the chuck key to tighten, wish I had the collet and
sleeve for quick changes, but they tell me that the #8 gets too
hot and there is the problem I mentioned with the collets only
fitting one size. I haven’t wanted to spring for the chuck key
with the handle on it, which is easier to use. Any comments,
guys? What do you use and how do you change quickly?

I use a Faro with a rapid release lever. It runs cool. It only
has the 3/32" collet, but then I rarely use any other size bur.
If I’m using drills or anything other than 3/32" shafts I’ve got
the #30 Jacob’s chuck.

If you are thinking about getting another handpiece, I’d advise
you to get one with a duplex spring unless you do mostly heavier
work. I find it can take a lot of weight off your hand without
raising and lowering your motor. They break often (about once or
twice a year for me), but they replace easily.

Dick Caverly


#9

Dick here is a little trick i learned about the weight of a
foredom. attach a large rubber band to the hanger and then to the
shaft. This takes the weight off the hand piece. I use a spring
from an old desk lamp and electrical wire attached to it and then
the shaft. I move the wire up and down the shaft for different
angle of support and the spring provides flex. You don’t have to
fight or support the weight of the shaft.

Frank


#10

Hi Chunk!

As with most folks, I started with a Foredom #30 handpiece. But
I soon discovered that most bits/burrs came in one of two shaft
sizes. They are three “spins” apart on my #30 handpiece wrench.

I eventually bought a #10(?)D (D is for duplex, as in it has a
spring) quick change handpiece. A really sweet upgrade, but it
only handles the smaller shaft bits (3/32?). Not as “broadly
functional” as the #30!

I also bought the AllSet deal from Rio. Fits on the #30. I
keep the harness on the #30 handpiece, and use it when I use
various kinds of burrs. However, I have my most common Cratex
wheels and buffs on the proper mandrel to fit the quick-change
handpiece (#10D).

The #30 standard “jacob’s chuck” will always suit a variety of
tools (custom and purchased), but the quick change handpieces
require the proper shaft diameter.

The quick-change (10D) is a luxury I could live without. I
could not function without my #30 handpiece! The ability to
chuck anything cylindrical is invaluable to an artisan!

I hope this helps,

Dave
Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#11

Dick:

Regardingthe duplex spring breaking, how much do you use the
handpiece and how much does it cost to replace thespring?


#12
The ability to chuck anything cylindrical is invaluable to an
artisan! 

Right on! There have been many times that I have chucked all
kinds of things ( jewelry related and not). Also, you can make
your own split mandrels and so forth (out of nails) when you have
the ability to chuck any size. I’m a firm supporter of the #30
handpiece. It doesn’t look as cute as some of the quick change
ones, but it sure gets the job done! Susan


#13

You should not have to support the weight of the shaft anyway.
If you have any weight then the unit is improperly hung. The
motor should be hung at a height so the drop of the shaft will
enable the shaft to turn at an angle which will allow the
handpiece to rest comfortably in your hand with no stress.
Imagine a capitol L. The motor is at the top of the vertical
shaft of the L and the handpiece is at the end of the bottom
leg. I have mine hung on a Foredom hanger on my bench and I just
reach out my hand and “there it is” with no stress, no weight,
no problems.

Lewis Elrod


#14

You misunderstand his point I think. In this, he is refering to
the constant weight of the handpiece bearing down when you are
cutting seats for setting stones, etc. Absolutely, the flex shaft
is hanging from a hook and you have the “l” that you are talking
about. If you have a lot of stones to set, just try out what he
is saying and you will definitely understand.Regards-RL


#15
I haven't wanted to spring for the chuck key with the handle on
it, which is easier to use.  Any comments, guys?  What do you
use and how do you change quickly? 

I have two approaches - the first it to cut off the handle from
a chuck key and thread it into a file handle or other piece of
material - a little epoxy - make sure it gets through the hole
in the key - and there you go - a cheapish handled chuck key -
the other thing I do when setting stones is use two or three
handpieces - i was lucky abd traded some labour for a few used
ones.

Cheers
Douglas


#16
What handpiece do you prefer. Are there disadvantages    to
the quickchange ones? 

I’ve been using a Foredom 18D for a couple of years. So far no
problems with the handpiece, had to replace the duplex spring
once. Only drawbacks

I’ve found to this one; only takes 3/32" bits, & the tool must
be stopped to change a bit.

If I have ever have to replace it, I may go with the 7D, you can
change bits while it’s running.

You might try Pfingst for flexshafts & handpieces & bits. They
sell to a lot of dentists & advertise in Lapidary Journal. They
show at Tucson ever y Jan/Feb, their prieces are better than
Foredom’s & the equipment is as go od or better.

FWIW: You can drive the pin from the Jacobs chuck key, enlarge
the hole i n a file handle to take the key, then cross drill the
file handle & hammer the pin through the file handle & key. Works
for me!

Dave


#17

Susan:

I use a #30 too, but I sometimes get tired because of the
thinckness of it and wish I had a slimmer handpiece. Haven’t
heard anyone else coment on this aspect yet.


#18
   Regardingthe duplex spring breaking, how much do you use
the handpiece and how much does it cost to replace thespring?

We use them all day every day, and they are a couple bucks to
repair if you do it yourself. You just have to be careful not to
lock up your bur in something because the shaft will keep
spinning and unwind the spring. Mark