Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Ametrine


#1

Hi Steve,
In response to your statement:

  the source in Bolivia has been revealed and many beautiful
natural ametrine specimens in their natural state have made it to
market. It is the only mine in the world that produces this
combination of citrine and amethyst within the same quartz crystal
straight from the ground in an untreated state.  

I would respectfully like to correct you on the above statement.
Although Bolivia is the major commercial source of Ametrine on
today’s market, it does occur naturally at various locations here in
the southern Appalachian Mountains. When it is found, it is of very
high quality with good color saturation. I have faceted several gems
from it and I personally like the color better than the South
American rough. It tends to be much darker than all but the most
expensive imported material with which it compares very favorably. I
have often heard the single source statement as made by you and would
like to correct it so others might know the facts.

Regards,
Mack Smith
@SmokyMtn43


#2

I just ran across a color in quartz I hadn’t seen before and I’m
wondering if this stuff is common.

Rather than the traditional ametrine with a very clear
demarcation/delineation between the amethyst section and the
citrine, this is a stone with a combination of the colors, a citrine
with a distinctly purple cast. It’s seems like a salmon but
somewhat bluer. I know it doesn’t seem to make sense to have a
color which contains both blue and yellow with no hint of green, but
there it is. Is this a color people have seen in quartz?

Derek


#3
Rather than the traditional ametrine with a very clear
demarcation/delineation between the amethyst section and the
citrine, this is a stone with a combination of the colors, a
citrine with a distinctly purple cast. 

Ametrin is a mix of amethyst and citrin. In my website you will see
a necklace I have made using a faceted ametrin and a briolet
ametrin. Faceted ametrin is exactly as you described above. Briolet
has two distinct colour yellow and purple. But if you look at this
stone from the pointed edge you will see a purple quartz with an
orange tint or wise versa. The colour depends from which way you
look at the stone. Do I make myself clear?
http://www.birdamlasu.com/jwamtrna.htm Kind regards from Turkey, Oya
Borahan


#4

The quote below was taken from page 6 of the August 2003 edition of
the International Colored Stone Association (ICA) gazette:

  Ambassador Ramiro M. Rivero (ICA Ambassador!) 

  "Bolivia's only gem mining operation, the Anahi Mine,
  continues to supply ametrine, amethyst and citrine to the world
  market. A diamond sawing system has been installed at the
  facility, resulting in higher yields and larger and cleaner
  sawn rough. Two new trade names for varieties of quartz have
  been presented to the market: Bolivianite, which shows a
  random combination of amethyst and citrine colours, and is used
  mainly in irregular or fancy cut stones; and is Anahite, which
  includes stones of a lilac hue that show a definite whitish,
  metal-like brilliance. The name ametrine is to be used only for
  stones that show a colour division, with one half amethyst and
  one half citrine." 

Thought it might be of interest to those on the list. This now means
that there are two more names to remember and no doubt for everyone
to get confused over! I feel the more names applied to varieties just
lead to more confusion in the market. Is it just me?

Regards - Nick


#5

Can you provide me the name of company and link of website which sell ametrine, amethyst and citrine. Please let us if you know anything