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Alumilite's amazing casting resin


#1

Hi all,

I just received my first and last shipment of "Amazing Casting Resin"
made by Alumilite. Unfortunately for me I discovered too late that
this resin makes an opaque white product. I have contacted the
company to suggest that they should mention this somewhere on they’re
website. However, they’re not too bothered about it. White resin has
extremely little use in jewelry making and now, I guess, I have
plenty for my next rummage sale. -Rockey


#2

Rockey,

Alumilite makes a white and a clear casting resin. I’ve used both,
and the clear is, well, clear. Perhaps you ordered or they shipped
the wrong product?

It’s very obvious on their website.

Wayne Emery
www.thelittlecameras.com


#3

Rockey,

I have used the stuff for the past 6 years to make vulcanizable
models (cnc milled) with no problems other than its damned hydro
scopic tendencies. It is a very nice bulk casting resin and sure
mills very nicely ( makes wax look really difficult ) I have never
found a problem with their web site even If I have found
cheaper sources.

I use the tan standard version (black tried once and it was ugly).
The only problem I have is its really short pot life.

I don’t work for them, no connections other than buying a gallon or
so a year.

jeffD
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modelling & Goldsmithing
http://www.gmavt.net/~jdemand


#4

Hi Rockey,

What were you going to use this resin for? I was thinking I might be
interested in buying it from you, since I refurbish jewelry. My
Sister, Julie, is also a crafter and we can always use resin. Email
me off line at [vevabailey at aol dot com].

Veva Bailey


#5

I don’t know about Alumilite specifically but there are colorants
that you can get to color the resins. If I remember correctly Rio is
one source.

John (Jack) Sexton


#6
I don't know about Alumilite specifically but there are colorants
that you can get to color the resins. If I remember correctly Rio
is one source. 

G’day I found the colour pigments from stationery shops, usually
sold for cheaply producing paints for children to play with
(Playschool) They are not water soluble but pigment powders, and the
colours are very bright and mixable, so I got a set of the primary
colours plus black and white and found I could produce the exact
coloured resin I wanted - I was using Araldite epoxy; and used yellow
and blue for green and toned it down with the careful addition of
black and white. Lasts years.–

Cheers for now,
JohnB of NZ