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Advanced stone setting


#1

I am wondering if anyone out there can lead me in the right direction or
maybee help me themselves. You see I have been looking to improve my pave’ and
bead setting-flat plate skills. Does anybody out there have any suggestions.?
I should tell you that I actually do pave’ and flat plate quite well but there
is always room for improvement anywhere as far as i am concerned. What i am
looking to do is maybee sit down with someone for a couple of days and get
some pointers on how to improve… So with that said I am sure someone will
have an idea… You guys/gals always do… Thanks alot…
Marc


#2

At 04:08 9/18/96 UT, you wrote:


#3

I am wondering if anyone out there can lead me in the right direction or
maybee help me themselves. You see I have been looking to improve my
pave’ and
bead setting-flat plate skills. Does anybody out there have any suggestions.?
I should tell you that I actually do pave’ and flat plate quite well but
there
is always room for improvement anywhere as far as i am concerned. What i am
looking to do is maybee sit down with someone for a couple of days and get
some pointers on how to improve… So with that said I am sure someone will
have an idea… You guys/gals always do… Thanks alot…
Marc

Hi Mark, the setting books listed at ‘tips for the jewelers bench’ by
Robert Wooding are the best thing going in English, he also gives one on
one tutorials ate 500.00 a week (pretty cheap for what you get. I like ‘The
setting of Gemstones’ by Walter Zeiss (my teacher) which is available in
English and German. The English is supposed to be a little rocky on the
translation but the drawings are ok. GRS company has some good videotapes
on setting (some boring bits) but great super close ups of engraving
procedures.

GRS, Glendo Corp., P.O. Box 1153, Emporia, Kansas 66801, (316-343-1084):
Heavy duty beautifully made tools designed for the professional goldsmith:
Benchmate/inside ring clamp and more. I highly recommend the Benchmate
system.

Robert Wooding, Dry Ridge Co, PO Box 18814, Erlanger, Kentucky, 41018, USA:
Good stonesetting books meant for the professional with lot of pictures. An
order of ten books gets a great discount. The best in English
at this point in time.

good luck

Charles

Brain Press
Box 1624, Ste M
Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2L7
Canada

tel: 403-263-3955
fax: 403-283-9053
Email: @Charles_Lewton-Brain


#4

I am wondering if anyone out there can lead me in the right direction or
maybee help me themselves. You see I have been looking to improve my pave’
and

bead setting-flat plate skills. Does anybody out there have any suggestions.?

The only things that I know are: Don’t use nickel alloyed white gold and
make sure that your gravers have a razor edge.

http://www.knight-hub.com/manmtndense/bhh3.htm
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain
snail mail: POB 7072, McLean, VA 22106-7972, U.S.A.


#5

Bruce:::
ON the subject of stone setting???
When I went to El Camino Colledge Jewelry lab cource One segment was
ingraving tools and how to hake them,how to temper them and how to sharpen
and Polish after the sharpening was done. I found out that a Swate Razor Hone
stone was or is one of the best hones that there is. The Hone was made back
in the middle 1800 and when the old man died he took the secret of how he
made the stone with hin when he died. His sons made them after his death but
they were never the same. I have a original Swate and it is a dark brown
color and it works great. I found mine in a swapmeat 20 years age and have
been using it ever since. I am a sculptor of Miniature Big Game animals .
They are carved in wax and I use the lost wax process and I cast them in
Sterling and 14K gold. I use all kind of dental tools and sharpen them to a
razor edge and then use the Swate for the final honing and finish them off
with a Elkhide Leather strap glued to a paint stick sturer and I charge it
with Jewelers Rouge . The last step is the leather strap.
I was tought to set stones by this method.
1: Ger a copper sheet i/8" thick and Half hard temper
2: Go and buy synthetic rubies of various sizes and drill holes in the
copper sheet to match the stones you want to use.
Practice rasing prongs with your diamond engraver untill you can raise a
prong with out cutting it off. When you reach this stage then start to raise
prongs and start setting the stones. As you progress with this exercise you
willbecome more efficient at the process.

My Prifessor Oliver told us that the reason to use synthetic rubies was that
they are verry close to the real thing and a lot cheaper and it a really
tough stone.
I went to school to Prof Oliver for 4 semesters and enjoyed every minute of
my time.
I later found out that he was one of the top I meam TOP instructors in the
whole USA.
He is living in Mamoth Calif the last I heard .
I hope I have helped you in the ingraving tecknique of Precious metals.
will be glad to hear from you any time Yours bibgbrba@aol.com,
bibgbrba@pacbell.net Billy S. Bates


#6

My Prifessor Oliver told us that the reason to use synthetic rubies was that
they are verry close to the real thing and a lot cheaper and it a really
tough stone.
I went to school to Prof Oliver for 4 semesters and enjoyed every minute of
my time.
I later found out that he was one of the top I meam TOP instructors in the
whole USA.
He is living in Mamoth Calif the last I heard .
I hope I have helped you in the ingraving tecknique of Precious metals.
will be glad to hear from you any time Yours bibgbrba@aol.com,
bibgbrba@pacbell.net Billy S. Bates

I’ve been bead and bright-cutting for most of the last 26 years. For a long
time I was willing to set in just about any material. I was initially taught
by a guy named Bill White in his trade shop, where I apprenticed. In the
last couple of years, I’ve decided that I don’t want to fight with nickel
alloyed white gold anymore. Yellow, pink, or green golds, platinum,
palladium or palladium gold alloys are fine, but you can have nickel alloyed
golds.
I was taught to start with brass. The hardness is a little closer to 14K golds.

http://www.knight-hub.com/manmtndense/bhh3.htm
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain
snail mail: POB 7072, McLean, VA 22106-7972, U.S.A.


#7

Hi all, been a couple of months since I was online last, 1400 messages
to catch up on. Whew! (Mostly from the artmetal forum)

Regarding diamond setting into nickle white golds, I would like to
forego that myself, but I still take on setting large genuine colored
stones into 18k white gold bezels. I have three on my bench now, a
7.75ct white sapphire long ant. cush. - a 12 ct. white sapphire oval,
and a 13.5 ct white sapphire oval. The bezels have scroll work pierced
into the sides etc… I do okay with them, but the time it take ruins
my productivity, just the same, I charge extra! I do pave’ in 18k white
also, I use a hammer and punch to raise the beads!! The one aspect I
love about the 18k white alloy I use is the color, it is so white it
looks like rhodium, and the bright cutting looks terrific, especially in
pierced filigree bead-set bright-cut. Now that I think about it, I think
I’ll increse the price for this kind of work again! :slight_smile:

I learned pave’ back in the early '70s. My teacher made me set
rhinestone into nickles. His strategy was that if a setter could pave’
set rhinestones into a rolled nickle, he could set anything, he was
right. At times I resorted to pre-bright cutting, making a pin-point
setting. All you have to do is seat the stone and press the bead tips
over, a little time consuming, but vastly superior results!

Handmade 18K and platinum gemstone jewelry. Fine die
and mold engraving. Diamond setting. Class rings/pins.
25 years experience in the manufacturing jewelry arts.

Bruce Holmgrain wrote: