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Acetylene, transport


#1

Here’s a variation of our gas discussion.

I use an MC acetylene tank, which I drained the last vapor out
of Friday. Made a mad dash to the welding supply, luckily had my
husband with me. Was informed that because the shop clerk knew
Bob, he was letting me take the tank, even though it is against
the law to transport it in a closed vehicle. Said unless I had
hubby with me, he wouldn’t sell it to me.

Well, since I only have an enclosed vehicle and since my husband
is usually out of town when the tank runs dry, I could be left in
a frustrating situation.

Any other US folks having to contend with this problem or are
they only cracking down in my area?

(And, yes John Burgess, we do need to talk with our lawmakers
here and straighten them out. But I fear this situation is
caused by a regulation that gets arbitrarily made and not sent
through Congress.)

Candy


#2

It is a federal law that you cannot transport any acetylene tank
or any gas without the proper vehicle and an MSDA with it. This
comes under the Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations in
the CRF Many gas houses fudge a little bit but at their own risk.
If you have an accident (automobile) then your are liable as
well as the business that sold you the gas. That’s why almost
every gas business has delivery to your door.

Ron


#3
 I use an MC acetylene tank, which I drained the last vapor
out of Friday. Made a mad dash to the welding supply, luckily
had my husband with me.  Was informed that because the shop
clerk knew Bob, he was letting me take the tank, even though it
is against the law to transport it in a closed vehicle. Said
unless I had hubby with me, he wouldn't sell it to me. Well,
since I only have an enclosed vehicle and since my husband    
is usually out of town when the tank runs dry, I could be left
in     a frustrating situation. Any other US folks having to
contend with this problem or are they only cracking down in my
area? (And, yes John Burgess, we do need to talk with our
lawmakers here and straighten them out.  But I fear this
situation is caused by a regulation that gets arbitrarily made
and not sent through Congress.)

What about transporting the tank -in the back seat of the
vehicle - with the “windows” open (on your vehicle???) I realize
that that still constitutes “enclosed” but the ventilation
problem may be solved . . .


#4

Candy:

Never heard of this. Got my acetylene tank exchanged in
Morristown, TN about six months ago at the welding supply and no
mention of what you describe. What about telling them it’s going
in the trunk with the lid up?


#5
What about transporting the tank -in the back seat of the
vehicle - with the "windows" open (on your vehicle???)  I
realize that that still constitutes "enclosed" but the
ventilation problem may be solved . . .

Hi, Fred Rossman here, May be you could use a car top carrier
like a ski rack or something of that sort. Regards Fred


#6

Gosh, I have never run into this problem and would really be in
a fix if I did. The gas supply houses I have purchased from have
no problem with me toting my tank home in my car and many times
are happy to load it into the car for me. (Which sometimes gets a
little on my nerves. I know they are trying to be nice but it
seems they think just cause I’m a girl that I can’t lift a B
tank.) But I have never heard mention of any laws being broken.
They usually like the tank to be placed on the floor in the back
of the car. My mind will be full next time I go for another tank.
Carrie Nunes @tnunes


#7

With regard to transporting Acetylene in a closed vehicle, I ran
into the same thing in California. I have to liberate the truck
from my husband to refill my tank. Our local vendor will not
even give me the tank if I am driving a car.

This is the case for propane or “barbecue gas” cylinders in many
parts of Australia. I would think that this attitude is
understandable, given the risk of people leaving full bottles in
the back seat of the car to heat up in the sun (you know how hot
it can get in a parked car…) One can only shudder at the
scenario of leaving a full bottle in the car while doing a bit of
’quick’ shopping (carefully locking the door and windows to
avoid car thieves) and having the release-valve kick open as the
temperature in the car quickly increases. Owner returns
(cigarette in hand?), opens door… Oops!

L.Veska


#8

Dear Candy:

How can they force you to prove if you have an open vehicle or
not (Unless they can see your vehicle from the shop window)??? I
hope they don’t start “cracking” down in NYC…

DeDe


#9

Prohibiting acetylene tank transport in enclosed vehicles…

Hi, Candy Last time I went to have my tank filled (I use
propane), I went with a friend who also needed to have her tank
filled (she uses acetylene). Instead of going to the place I
usually go for fillups, I went to hers. First the guy wanted to
know if we were filling up the tanks for our “husbands”. Then
when he found out that we were transporting the tanks in closed
vehicles, he gave us many dire warnings and showed us pictures
and a newspaper clipping on the wall about a woman who was
transporting gas and set off an explosion when she opened her car
door (she probably left the car parked with tank inside in this
Florida heat). He agreed to fill our tanks, after we promised
him to drive straight home with the windows opened in the car
(which I would have done anyway). Laurie


#10
I use an MC acetylene tank ... mad dash to the welding supply 
...  luckily had my husband with me ...  it is against 
the law to transport it in a closed vehicle ... only have an 
enclosed vehicle ... frustrating situation ... Any other US 
folks having to contend with this problem or are they only 
cracking down in my area?

No, it’s not you, or your area, unless perhaps you live in
Memphis, Tennessee! I have had the same problem. I drive a Jeep
Cherokee, which is really sort of a station wagon. I have coped
with this by 1) driving away with the rear hatch open 2) putting
the tanks on the roof rack (have you ever tried to get a full
sized oxygen and acetylene tank off the ROOF of a Jeep?) 3)
taking my small utility trailer 4) finally building (half-built,
really - need to finish before I run out of gas!) a "wheel-less"
trailer. This is a small platform that inserts in the trailer
hitch receiver, and is fully supported by it. 5) My supplier
offered to deliver and pick up tanks, even those as small as an
MC tank, but I would have to be at home (shop) to do this, and I
still have a day job! I am assured that the wheel-less trailer
will be acceptable. I just hope no one follows too closely, and
rear-ends me!

My wife has had the same problem with propane tanks for the gas
grill! I agree that there should be some solution that is
acceptable to the regulating agency, but dad-gummed if I can
think of something that would be acceptable! If you find
anything that is, please let us ALL know!

<> Marrin T. Fleet <>
<> MFleet@cc.memphis.edu <>
<> SCT Corp. in adminstration of: <>
<> Admin. Computing Services <>
<> The University of Memphis <>
<> Memphis, TN 38152 <>
<> 901-678-3604 <>


#11

I was wondering if anyone has had this problem in NYC (getting
an acetylene tank filled and having to prove how you are
transporting tank) Please let me know!!! I am curious. I just
bought a tank and had it filled without a problem and I took a
cab home (!!!). I hope I don’t run >into problems in the
future…

DeDe


#12
 I use an MC acetylene tank, which I drained the last vapor out
 of Friday. Made a mad dash to the welding supply, luckily had my
 husband with me.  Was informed that because the shop clerk knew
 Bob, he was letting me take the tank, even though it is against
 the law to transport it in a closed vehicle. Said unless I had
 hubby with me, he wouldn't sell it to me.
 Well, since I only have an enclosed vehicle and since my husband
 is usually out of town when the tank runs dry, I could be left in
 a frustrating situation.
 Any other US folks having to contend with this problem or are
 they only cracking down in my area?

My supplier near Detroit told me the same about a year ago. I
use propane and can take that tank to a nearby U-Haul dealer that
doesn’t mind me carrying it in the car. It’s good to be extremely
cautious carrying tanks in a car, my welding supplier has a few
good photo’s of badly damaged auto’s tacked to the wall.

Dick Caverly
rcaverly@aol.com


#13
I was wondering if anyone has had this problem in NYC (getting 
an acetylene tank filled and having to prove how you are
transporting tank) 

DeDe

I have never had a problem getting an acetylene tank filled in
NYC. Last time I had it done I took the subway home!

Jill
@jandr
http://members.tripod.com/~jilk


#14

Jill:

I have gone to Metaliferious (spelt right?) to have my tank
filled. Where have you gone? Just curious…

DeDe


#15
Gosh, I have never run into this problem and would really be
in a fix if I did. The gas supply houses I have purchased from
have no problem with me toting my tank home in my car and many
times are happy to load it into the car for me. (Which
sometimes gets a little on my nerves. I know they are trying to
be nice but it seems they think just cause I'm a girl that I
can't lift a B tank.) But I have never heard mention of any
laws being broken. They usually like the tank to be placed on
the floor in the back of the car. My mind will be full next
time I go for another tank. Carrie Nunes tnunes@usit.net

Some guys still have manners . . . even though they realize that
the female can lift the “b” tank by herself. Perhaps some of the
laws are only Local ones??? I haven’t encountered any problems
yet either. . …


#16
 Gosh, I have never run into this problem and would really be
in a fix if I did. The gas supply houses I have purchased from
have no problem with me toting my tank home in my car and many
times are happy to load it into the car for me. (Which
sometimes gets a little on my nerves. I know they are trying to
be nice but it seems they think just cause I'm a girl that I
can't lift a B tank.) But I have never heard mention of any
laws being broken. They usually like the tank to be placed on
the floor in the back of the car. My mind will be full next
time I go for another tank. Carrie Nunes tnunes@usit.net

Some guys still have manners . . . even though they realize that
the female can lift the “b” tank by herself. Perhaps some of the
laws are only Local ones??? I haven’t encountered any problems
yet either. . …


#17
Some guys still have manners . . . even though they realize that
the female can lift the "b" tank by herself.  

I have had people to literally cuss me out when I tried to be
polite, like this! It is unfortunate, but that’s the way it is
at the moment!

Perhaps some of the laws are only Local ones???  I haven't

encountered any problems yet either. . …

Nope! I don’t think so! The suppliers here in Memphis tell us
that this is a U.S Department of Transportaion regulation (not
the same as law, John!) and that many suppliers ignore the ruling
untill they are CAUGHT, and get a strongly worded warning, as in
threat to revoke their license to sell hazardous gas! Recently,
my supplier has offered to pick up and deliver even small
amounts, and to keep track of and return my tanks. There is a
new service here that will do the same with propane tanks, home
or business, for not a lot more than carrying them somewhere to
be refilled, and a lot more convenient. Convenient, that is, if
you are going to be at home or in your shop for them to make the
call!

<> Marrin T. Fleet <>
<> MFleet@cc.memphis.edu <>
<> SCT Corp. in adminstration of: <>
<> Admin. Computing Services <>
<> The University of Memphis <>
<> Memphis, TN 38152 <>
<> 901-678-3604 <>