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Acetylene tank storage


#1

I’ve been working with my acetylene tank on the patio here at home.
I store my acetylene tank outside on my patio. I live in Arizona,
so it can become quite hot outside. I never was concerned about
having my acetylene tank out there until today - when someone
mentioned having an acetylene tank in the hot sun can be very
dangerous. Now I’m pretty concerned. I have a mini tank. Am I
doing something dangerous by having my tank out there? It’s been
out there for 2 months, but now I’m not so sure that’s where it
should be. Storing it inside is not an option. Can someone tell me
if it’s ok to store it outside like I have been?


#2

Catherine - I live in Florida and all the suppliers here for
Acetylene store their tanks outside. I believe I read the acetylene
tank could withstand temperatures up to 130 degrees. I may be
wrong, but I have to believe that if it were dangerous to store them
outside, none of the establishments around here would be doing it.
It gets hot as all get out here - though perhaps not as hot as
Arizona. I’d simply call the supplier and check with them.

Kay


#3

My local welding supply , where I have my tanks refilled, has a seies
of photos on the wall, of a car that had a acetylene tank in the
trunk. Heat from sun, caused it to explode. In the entire series of
pics, hardly any part is recognizable as an automobile. I believe the
pics were taken locally, which is Indiana, where the sun and temp is
not nearly as warm as AZ.


#4

Hi Catherine,

I live in Arizona, so it can become quite hot outside.  I never was
concerned about having my acetylene tank out there until today -
when someone mentioned having an acetylene tank in the hot sun can
be very dangerous.

I can’t speak about the disposable tanks, but the refillable tanks
are ok out in the sun, even in AZ. Just notice all the welding tanks
mounted on the back of construction company trucks that never get
into the shade.

Welding gas tanks (other tanks too) are made to very high standards
& are tested on a periodic basis.

There are many well meaning people out there making statements with
little or no basis in fact. Contact a store that sells welding gases
& supplies for factual info.

Dave


#5

Check with your supplier, and do as they suggest. If it were me I
would keep it in the shade. Well if it were me I’d find something
other than acetylene, but never mind my personal bias.

Perhaps in a well ventilated area of the garage? Do not worry about
disaster pictures, I think they have them for any compressed fuel.
The car trunk story MAY be about tipping the tank so it loses the
stabilizing liquid inside. Or breaking the valve, or a leak and a
running engine… Shade and ventilation should be safe. Good for
you NOT keeping it in the house. I wish that no one would keep
propane or any compressed fuel tank where they and their family
sleeps.

Daniel Ballard
WWW.Pmwest.us


#6

Hi,

In Australia at least, I am aware of Acetylene cylinders that were a
hazard in the heat many years ago. The problem wasn’t the cylinders
themselves but a fuseable plug mounted on the top section - I guess
it was a safety valve in case of fire or overheating.

I was doing a basic firefighting subject in the Royal Australian Air
Force when one of our instructors raised the subject and showed some
photo’s. The problem cylinders were mounted in small external
enclosures on the outside of sheds in an area of Australia that
rarely gets too hot. Several of these enclosures were painted in
dark colours and some were actually painted black. A prolonged heat
wave in an extremely hot summer caused the temperatures to rise above
the fusable plugs temperature rating and caused a number of them to
vent off.

I don’t know if they put higher temperature plugs in but the fire
authorities did suggest light coloured enclosures.

Regards,
Brian.
Sunny Queensland, Australia


#7

I don’t know the differences in pressure/heat sensitivity, But I
lived on a boat for 12 years and know many people who live on boats.
Our tanks were stored in a special box on deck, which is common. San
Francisco doesn’t get that hot, but I’ve never heard of anyone
having any problems.

By the way, most houses in the country in France use small propane
tanks.

Leslie