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Accidental Filing-Close Encounters of the


#1

Ricky,

I do mostly bezel setting, I use a rocking setter in addition to
my hammer setter. Blisters and callouses were forming on my
palms during heavy work times, so I went out and bought an
inexpensive pair of bicycle gloves. Fingers of the gloves are
cut off, and it has a padded leather palm. End of problem. Many
of them are open mesh, so they are not too hot to work in for
long periods of time. Also helps when I do a lot of metal
snipping and sawing. You wouldn’t catch me with anything other
than finger cots on my hands when polishing though. Lisa


#2

use another pair at the buffer- leave off the cutting of the
fingers. Regards-

Ricky,

Full gloves at the buffing wheel are a good way to break your
hands :frowning: Never use full gloves when working with rotating
machinery. There are several types of finger guards that only
cover the fingers individualy. If these get caught by the wheel
then they come right off unlike a pair of gloves which will pull
your hands and arms in and try to wrap them around the spindle.

Jim

James Binnion Metal Arts
2916 Chapman St
Oakland, CA
(510) 436-3552


@jbin


#3
Greetings Ladies- I lost the post, but here is a tip for the
problems associated with  stabbing yourself with gravers, files,
and other tattoo instruments. . . . . .

Hi all-

I’ve been looking at my fingers each time one of these post
comes by and wondering why I don’t have black spots. Finally
dawned on me when Ricky’s post came by. My hands are pretty weak
due to an auto accident years ago and my right thumb has a tendon
flex problem I just live with because surgery would take too much
time away from making stuff. IAC I use rubber finger cots on my
thumb, middle and index fingers to help me hold tightly w/o slips
(on left hand only - I’m right handed) and also at the buffing
wheel (on both hands) because I AM A SISSY about heat. Gesswein
has them in several sizes.

Nancy


#4
   when I do a lot of metal  snipping and sawing.  You
wouldn't catch me with anything other   than finger cots on my
hands when polishing though.

Absolutely- I should clarify by adding that I also use these
finger cots if polishing something small enough that the buffer
will come in contact with my fingers or hand. I was speaking of
buffing larger items which I do alot, where your hands are
safely out of the way, you see? It’s the old machinist’s dilemma
this.Regards-


#5

Jim’s right. If you need extra protection try the following.

For years I have pieced together my own finger protectors using
rubber and leather finger cots. I use rubber cement to glue the
rubber finger cots inside the commercially available leather
finger protectors. I have been able to hold things longer when
buffing without feeling the heat. This is particularly useful for
buffing larger items like cuff bracelets. Many times I can hear a
sizzle when I dip them in water to cool (container of water next
to buffer highly recommended). Works great.

Kenneth Gastineau
@Kenneth_Gastineau1
http://www.ud.net/gastineau


#6

I may be called a heretic, but I’ve got to say this. Many
people more experienced than I will tell you horror stories
about people getting their wrists snapped by trying to wear
gloves when at the buffer. All I can say is this works for me,
and you may not want to try this at your own risk. 'Nuf said?

I keep a pair of skin-tight leather racquetball gloves in the
studio for polishing work. No loose areas or parts hanging
down… nothing to get caught by the spinning buff. They allow
me to be much more productive by being able to tolerate the
pieces as they get hotter. The finger tips may fray… then go
out and get a new pair immediately, and cut the fingers out of
the old ones for use at the bench.

My biggest concern is cross-contamination from the gloves. I
suppose I should have one pair for rouge and another for
tripoli, huh?

Okay, now you can stone me! :wink:

Dave

Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#7

Would golf gloves work the same? I have several pairs of those
(or at least one hand.) I purchased heavy leather (but, not too
big for my hands) gloves to wear while polishing, nothing to get
caught there either.


#8
I keep a pair of skin-tight leather racquetball gloves in the
studio for polishing work.  No loose areas or parts hanging
down... nothing to get caught by the spinning buff.

I am a part-time newbie. In my ‘day job’ as a middle aged
computer geek, it is considered a no-no to have anything but
pristine hands and nails. Therefore, I wear … ya guessed it!
… skin-tight gloves! I get goatskin driving gloves from
WalMart, as tight as possible. They stretch. Now, if I could get
them with fingers just a l-i-t-t-l-e bit shorter!

I have dabbled in blacksmithing for quite a while, and now for
the first time I’m able to keep my hands clean. Working with
copper and silver at the bench, buffing, sanding, grinding and
buffing actually stains the skin, and it won’t scrub off. What’s
the big deal about keeping my hands clean? Right now, I am
free-lancing in computer documentation and support. Every day or
every week, I am in the office of a new client meeting new
people, and I feel first impressions are valuable. I may
regret the gloves should I hurt myself down the road, but right
now, they are necessary!

I’m glad there is at least one other glove wearer!

Marrin Fleet
@Marrin_and_Mary_Dell
Memphis, TN


#9

I make jewelry full time and at the end of the day my hands are
filthy, I find that soap and a nail brush always get them clean.
If not, try a little lemon juice in soapy water and soak for a
minute or two. Better to spend a little more time cleaning up
than to risk a hand injury by wearing gloves. - Deb


#10
I make jewelry full time and at the end of the day my hands are
filthy,  I find that soap and a nail brush always get them clean.
 If not, try a little lemon juice in soapy water and soak for a
minute or two.  Better to spend a little more time cleaning up
than to risk a hand injury by wearing gloves.

I have to second this motion and suggest Dawn clear dish
detergentwhich does a great job on any grease that got on your
hands. Grease and/or oil seems to have an afinity for silver dust
and rouge and

if any abrasives remain on your hands they will abrade your
rings when you put them back on to turn your fingers black.

I do hope everyone is taking rings and watches off before using
ANY power tools.

BTW, DKJEWELRY’s lemon juice suggestion will also kill
rhinoviruses and help prevent the spread of colds.

Rich Balding aka Jerry Mings and/or Justin Witzig
mailto:@Jerry_Mings
http://www.net-quest.com/~wizard/ - Wizard Home Page
http://www.net-quest.com/~wizard/daphne.html - alt.fan.daphnes-corner
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