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A Future in Appraising?


#1

After having a short run in the repair/custom jewelry side of the
industry and reading the posts concerning the quality of employment
with bigger companies (such as Sterling or possibly Zales corp.) I’m
seriously considering checking into doing appraisals.

I’m not certified for it and I only have slight training in gemstone
identification (I’m intersted in taking GIA’s GG course at some
point). To me, if there isn’t much demand for appraisals in the
jewelry field, it’s probably not worth my time and money to get the
training and credentials to do it. So, is there a future in
appraisals? If so, where would I start?

Any advice is greatly appreciated.

Rene Howard


#2
To me, if there isn't much demand for appraisals in the jewelry
field, it's probably not worth my time and money to get the
training and credentials to do it. So, is there a future in
appraisals? If so, where would I start? 

If you want to work in the jewelry industry, you cannot hurt
yourself by having your GG. It will only open doors. Appraisals and
gem ID’s have only become more necessary as synthetics get better and
better and treatments become ever more varied.

If you’re doing it just for a job, forget it. If you love it and you
want to pursue it no matter what, go for it. It has to interest you
and you have to be committed to keeping up to date.

To start, figure out which training option at GIA you want to use,
and choose your appraisal training course. Check out ASA, ISA. You
can take your USPAP course through them or sometimes it’s cheaper
through a real estate apprasier training place, and it’s the same
course.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#3

Our retail store employs an independent gem lab for appraisals only.
Along with retail sales and repairs, we can also provide an
independent appraisal for customers. Is there a future in it? Well,
while we do a fair amount of appraisals, I’d be reluctant to rely on
it as primary income. The main advantage is having no inventory to
bother with. However, equipment is expensive, and a set of diamond
masterstones is required. Although CZ stones are accurate when
purchased, professional appraisers don’t like to rely on them, citing
that they may change color in time. You can’t simply buy a set of
masterstones, either. You have to assemble your own set and have them
graded and certified at a recognized gem lab, such as GIA.

If you really want to get into jewelry appraisal, GIA’s GG program
is a good start, but it isn’t enough by itself. Further education is
necessary. The American Society of Appraisers (ASA) has a great
Master Gemologist Appraiser program, but if you think GIA costs,
consider that you’ll be paying for a B.S. degree while you’re paying
for the M.G.A. diploma.

Since there is no legal requirement of credentials to appraise
jewelry here in the US, anybody can call themselves such, and that
shouldn’t be so. However, the basic GG training, coupled with some
good old-fashioned book learning can go a long way toward producing a
decent appraiser. One of the better books out there is titled Gems &
Jewelry Appraising: Techniques of Professional Practice by Anna M.
Miller, G.G., M.G.A., R.M.V. There are other books on the subject
that are just as good.

A GG diploma is great for learning the beginner’s skills for
identifying but it takes a lot of real-world experience
to master that. Jewelry appraising is a much further science that
requires not only the ability to identify and separate gemstones and
precious metals, but to value them for insurance replacement,
liquidation sale, divorce, etc. While most of our appraisals are for
insurance replacement and divorce, we also do estate liquidation as
well as appraisals for the FBI and DEA with property they’ve seized.
These are much more complicated that simply identifying the stones,
weighing the metal, estimating gem weight, looking up gem values in a
price guide and adding a percentage for retail value. Period jewelry
is common enough, as well as guild store pieces and even costume
jewelry can be quite valuable. Many times, the customer’s insurance
premium is a major consideration.

If you’re lucky, as I am, you may find an independent store with an
M.G.A. or a G.G. with a lot of appraisal experience who is willing
to train you. You’ll still need a good gemology diploma, but the
"meat and bones" of appraising can be learned from an experienced
expert. The rest comes with time.

James S. Duncan, G.G.
James in SoFL


#4

Hi Rene, there is a definite future in appraisals. The buying public
is becoming more sophisticated in their purchasing and also wanting
to have an accurate value set with what they currently own.
Expendable income has been more than ever before and with that comes
the willingness to pay for accurate valuation of their jewelry.

You do need to complete some certification in gemology to give you
the knowledge of But as Anna Miller has said in her years
as a renown author and jewelry appraiser, “there is a common
misconception that a person trained in gemology is also qualified to
value gems and Jewellery. Competence in valuing and appraising gems
and jewelry is more difficult to acquire than the technical ability
required of the gemologist”

And I say, because you have been in the industry as a jewelry, you
have a good head start on this career option. Call me with questions,
or email,

Regards, Dee
Dee Rouse Huth
Executive Director
California Institute of Jewelry Training
www.jewelrytraining.com


#5

Check out our mastervaluer.com this program is internationally
recognized and the author is Anna Miller, author of the popular books
on Appraising. as were mentioned in this thread… One of the better
books out there is titled Gems & Jewelry Appraising: Techniques of
Professional Practice by Anna M. Miller, G.G., M.G.A., R.M.V. She has
several.

MasterValuer is taught in a comprehensive home study program with
tutor assigned and it is also required to take a 3 day workshop
before Certificate of Completion.

To become a Registered MasterValuer Diploma holder, it is required
that you have a certificate in gemology.

MV is taught in residence in North America, Vancouver, Toronto,
Montreal, University of South Florida,& Sacramento and workshops are
held at all of the above and looking at Denver and New York City for
workshop sites. Internationally in Korea, 4 RMV sites, Beijing, and
Hong Kong, for those of you who are so far away.

Appraisers all over the world know and respect Anna’s contribution
to appraisal and have heard it said many times, if appraised by a MV,
it should be a very good appraisal.

In Canada, it is required that those become Registered Appraisers
have successfully completed the RMV program.

Yes, I like this program…

Dee Rouse Huth
Executive Director
California Institute of Jewelry Training