Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

95-5 Plaladium as casting Alloy


#1

Hi All,

Has anyone tried to use 95-5 Palladium as a white gold alloy for 14k
White gold. If so, how did it turn out? Would this work for either
18k or 10k.? The Palladium white gold I have set seemed as stiff as
18k that was nickel based. I’ve got the Palladium in the shop, but
thought I would get orchids input first.

Jim Zimmerman
@Jim_Zimmerman3


#2

Jim,

I haven’t tried the casting alloy but did have an experience this
week with Hoover’s new 950 PD product. I lasered earring posts on
mountings and while testing them to see if they were attached well
(old habits never die, even at the laser) they snapped off above
where they were attached. After calling Hoover’s tech guys I found
that they have noticed a similar problem when lasering the new alloy.
Their solution is to use argon as a cover gas. Somehow, using the
laser without a cover gas imparts gases into the alloy in the area
that was welded causing it to break with a jagged, frosted look. I
thought I would share this with everybody to save you some time and
trouble.

James S. Cantrell CMBJ


#3

Hi James,

Thanks for the reply.

I use the PUK2 with argon, not the same as a laser I know. But, going
through what the company said about post. Something’s are still
better solder the traditional way. Solder creates a fillet and is
stronger. I’m still learning the PUK2 stuff. There are things it does
quite well. I can tell you that it doesn’t like thin cross section,
even on lowest setting. Sorta like magic, they just disappear.

Jim


#4

Jim,

We have been using Hoover’s 950 TruPd as a casting alloy with good
results. It is definitely a very tricky alloy to cast (as is the
case with all Pd) but if you have a good platinum casting system and
use an induction machine with vacuum and argon back fill you should
be able to get good castings. Palladium really likes to absorb gas so
torch melting would be a difficult method at best.

Another caution is the flow of this metal. It has behaved well with
most designs, however filigree and very thin walled pieces have had
a tendency to no-fill when compared to the same designs in platinum.

Other than that, the as-cast hardness is decent at Hv110 (although
I’d like to see it at 135 and Hoover is working on that) and the
recycle ability is good. Laser is great with Pd, and I agree with the
last post that lasering with argon is better.

I am writing a paper on palladium casting for Santa Fe Symposium
this year so a lot more experimentation and to come!

Teresa Frye
TechForm Advanced Casting Technology
Portland OR
503-652-5224


#5

Hi Teresa,

We have been using Hoover's 950 TruPd as a casting alloy with good 

Thanks for the heads up. I will go ahead with a test flask. I’m using
hydrogen & oxygen torch to do platinum. Hopefully the neutral
atmosphere will help.

Jim Zimmerman
Alpine Custom Jewellers & Repair
http://www.handengravingcanada.com


#6
I will go ahead with a test flask. I'm using hydrogen & oxygen
torch to do platinum. Hopefully the neutral atmosphere will help. 

Hydrogen is the worst fuel gas to use with palladium alloys, it
sucks it up like oxygen into silver. Use propane or natural gas.

Jim

James Binnion
@James_Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


360-756-6550


#7

Hi James,

Hydrogen is the worst fuel gas to use with palladium alloys, it
sucks it up like oxygen into silver. Use propane or natural gas. 

Thanks, I have both types of torches for casting and will use the
propane and oxygen torch. This forum is making my life at the bench a
lot easier.

Jim Zimmerman
Alpine Custom Jewellers & Repair
http://www.handengravingcanada.com