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7.25 silver


#1

What does a 7.25 mark mean on a silver piece of jewelry? I have read that it can be a mark (725) that means it was made in Mexico or that there is only 725/1000 silver used in it.


#2

Maybe 7.25 refers to the copper part of the sterling alloy.


#3

Erica
When I was down in Mexico some years ago…everything WAS much cheaper…I
asked the attendant why? We use only 725 silver…725 mixed with what??? No
answer!!..:>( WOOPS…I did walk away!

Gerry Lewy
Toronto, Ontario.
Canada!


#4

So if it is 725 silver the remaining base metals are… I’d walk away too. This question came from a comment on a blog (10 Types of Silver used in Jewelry) that we had written back in 2013 and the comment had asked why we didn’t talk about 7.25 silver. Until this morning I had never even heard of it plus the 7.25 confused me as well. I could see it as being 72.5 but 7.25?


#5

That’s one answer I haven’t heard yet. Thank you for sharing that guess! :smile:


#6

I’m an American living in Mexico and have never seen .725 on any silver down here.
.925 is the standard but you might see anything between there and .999.
Dick Stromberg


#7

Are you sure it’s not white gold?


#8

Is there any chance that 7.25 could be a measurement of some kind? Bracelet/chain length, ring size, etc.?


#9

The person just said it is 7.25 silver. It was bought on a cruise ship, it’s very hard, not flexible and it wears very well.


#10

Strange. Well, it was just a shot in the dark since the decimal in that just doesn’t make any sense otherwise. Like others have said, 72.5 or .725 I could understand, but 7.25 just makes no sense at all. Good luck in your search!


#11

With all the people here on Orchid, and all the experience they represent, not being able to figure this out, maybe the answer is as simple as the maker didn’t really understand marking.

Alec


#12

You said the magic phrase. “Bought on a cruise ship” You do not get what you pay for on cruise ships. Wait until you see the gem stones they try to pass off on you. My hubbies boss’ wife bought some tourmalines on a cruise ship. They were .2 of a carat each. She was told they were 2 carat. You would think she would know better. When I tested them, they were glass. Yet she swore they were real. I also had to dissuade her from thinking she was going to have a pair of earrings the size of Angelina Jolie’s emerald earrings. She had it in her head that they would magically become that size once they were properly set. I ended up telling her that I was not equipped to deal with tourmalines. She believed that. I never did find out if she finally got someone to set them for her. Buyer beware of cruise ship deals.


#13

It could simply be a badly stamped 925…


#14

Is it a kind of reticulation silver?

Over on Rio’s website, they have 80/20 reticulation silver in sheet.

Guessing…

Tricia


#15

I have heard of the 725, but gads that was years ago, my family is a rodeoing family ( hence the cowgirl part of my name) and the silver Mexican conchos are where I saw the marking, UNFORTUNATELY the saddle set I’m talking about is long gone and scavenged by the kids. But I can see where that with conches make sense. If I find one (major tack cleanout soon) I’ll post.


#16

As for the expats living in Mexico, we’ve been talking about it or Belize. Curious to hear how it’s going down there.


#17

That would be great! This is a huge mystery but It does make me feel better that whatever this metal is, it doesn’t seem to be well known. I’m a beginner so I just assumed it was ignorance on my part! :slight_smile:


#18

Many of the Mexican conchas were made from coins. What is the silver content in Mexican pesos?

I remember my Dad telling me that the Cherokee Smith he learned from often used old Mexican coins and US silver dollars for material to work with.

I have coin silver pieces in my collection that are stamped " Coin 800". I’d not be surprised to learn Mexican coin is less that 800.

Don Meixner.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROIDOn Apr 14, 2017 11:06 AM, Debra Smith <orchid@ganoksin.com> wrote:

Debra_Smith

April 14

I have heard of the 725, but gads that was years ago, my family is a rodeoing family ( hence the cowgirl part of my name) and the silver Mexican conchos are where I saw the marking, UNFORTUNATELY the saddle set I'm talking about is long gone and scavenged by the kids. But I can see where that with conches make sense. If I find one (major tack cleanout soon) I'll post.


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#19

We love our lives in Mexico. They tell us there are 60,000 expats, mostly Americans and Canadians in our area, but it’s an incredibly international area. We have no heat nor cooling in our homes. It’s often said people come here for the weather, but stay for the people. The Mexicans are GREAT people. Of course there are scoundrels all over, but we feel perfectly safe. Though there are many people here who do not speak a word of Spanish, if you just try, the Mexicans will make it well worth your while. Perhaps this isn’t appropriate for Ganoksin Orchid, but if you’ll email me privately at Ajijico@Yahoo.com I’ll be more than happy to answer any of your questions. Please be sure I can tell that you are writing because of our exchange on Orchid. I get so many emails I delete a lot of them without opening them.
Dick Stromberg
Ah Mexico! Where “C” on a faucet means HOT, and “M” on a restroom means THE LADIES ROOM.


#20

Most early 20th century Mexican silver coins are .80 fine, they were .90 fine in the late 1800s until perhaps 1905. After (depending on denomination) 1935-45 they were .720 fine, and some issues were as low as .50 (late 1940s) and .30 (1950 and later). A lot depends on denomination. Pesos from 1957 - 67 for example are .10 fine.