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330 vs. 2-ton epoxy


#1

Hi all,

What is the difference between Epoxy 330 and Devcon 2-ton epoxy? I’m
doing inlay for the first time and am almost to the gluing stage. I
already have some 330 but am debating whether the Devcon would be
better to use. Perhaps somebody has had experience with both and
prefers one over the other???

Many thanks as always, Carol Carter-Wientjes


#2

I have been taking an inlay class with a real master here in Tucson.
He does not recommend the epoxy and hasn’t used the Devcon. He has
recommended Opticon: Resin No. 224 Fracture Sealer. He uses an 8 to 1
ratio rather than the 10 to 1 ratio. You have about 45 minutes to
manipulate the stones until it starts to dry. Good luck! Diana


#3

Carol - I cannot speak to Devcon as I have always used Epoxy 330.
There are inlay pieces of mine around which are over 25 years old
which are still beautiful! Epoxy 330 “dries” water-clear and rigid,
and the pieces I still know of have not suffered from stones popping
out (except from accidental abuse) since 1977.

Jim Small
Small Wonders Lapidary


#4
       I have been taking an inlay class with a real master here
in Tucson. He does not recommend the epoxy and hasn't used the
Devcon. He has recommended Opticon: Resin No. 224 Fracture Sealer.
He uses an 8 to  1 ratio rather than the 10 to 1 ratio.  You have
about 45 minutes to manipulate the stones until it starts to dry. 
Good luck! Diana 

Keep in mind that Opticon IS an epoxy. Made by the same folks who
make epoxy 220 and 330. One note as well. In general, slower
setting epoxies, like Opticon, tend to be stronger more durable.
Among other things, they are sometimes better able to resist
degredation from water. Epoxy 220, for example, though it’s more of
an amber color than 330, sets more slowly, and is fully water proof,
while 330 is not quite as water proof over time. Same thing, I
believe, with the Devcons. Five minute versions are generally not
very waterproof over time, while the two hour setting ones, are
pretty good.

One other note to keep in mind, though the packages don’t often
emphasize it, the end strength and durability of all epoxies is quite
affected by the proper ratios of hardener to resin. Opticon is
unusual in that it can be varied for different effects, but most
epoxies are designed to cure as hard and strong as possible, while
opticon is not, intended to actually remain a viscous liquid inside
the fractures, with only the surface of the stone sealed with
hardened resin. . With most types, like 220, 330, and the devcons,
a mix of a 1:1 ratio of the two parts is specified. An error in that
ratio of as little as ten percent, in some cases, can result in a
loss of as much as half the bond strength. Measure carefully for
critical applicatons. I use, and recommend, as small scale, rather
than just a visual guess at equal amounts. Or, the twin tube/syringe
dispensers that dispense both parts at once are pretty good, so long
as you’re careful not to have different sized air bubbles in the tip
of the nozzles before you squeeze the handle.

Peter


#5

Hello Orchidians…

  Or, the twin tube/syringe dispensers that dispense both parts at
once are pretty good, so long as you're careful not to have
different sized air bubbles in the tip of the nozzles before you
squeeze the handle. 

I’ve used the Devcon two ton varity of epoxy in the tubes for years
for varied applications…and occasioanlly in jewelry…

What I’ve found that works for dispensing is to store the unit with
the capped dispensing openings up…with a bubble of air at the top
of both sides…Then before you use it, uncap, and holding it
vertical, force the air out with the plunger…Kinda like they do in
the movies when they’re clearing a syringe for an injection…just
don’t squirt the stuff out… You will find you can vary the pressure
to whichever side needs it…

When all of the air is out of both sides…dispense your dollops
for mixing… And again you can vary the pressure to one side or the
other to get equal amounts…

One more thing…I always mix the stuff together for a full
minute…even though it looks mixed earlier…that’s almost as
important as getting the amounts correct…

Gary W. Bourbonais


#6

Hello Peter: I was wondering if you know how long 330 epoxy lasts
before going bad? I used the metal tubes before and the last time I
bought it I decided to get the larger plastic squeeze bottles. I have
had it for 2 years now and it still seems to work fine. Does this
type epoxy go bad? Thanks Michael R. Mathews Sr. Victoria,Texas USA


#7

Also I’d add what someone on Orchid told me a few years ago: be
careful what you mix it on. I was using a plastic lid from an old
butter or yogurt container. The epoxy was failing for me. I was told
that the plastic might be reacting with the epoxy and changing it’s
chemical composition some way. So after that I used a piece of foil
to mix on and the result was good. Annette


#8

Annette, You might find it a lot easier to mix epoxy on a piece of
4X4 inch tile obtained at the Home Depot. When you are finished you
can clean the tile with shellac thinner. (wood alcohol) Lee Epperson


#9
    You might find it a lot easier to mix epoxy on a piece of 4X4
inch tile obtained at the Home Depot. When you are finished you can
clean the tile with shellac thinner. (wood alcohol) 

Simplest method of mixing epoxy in the amounts we generally use - a
pad of “Post Its”, and a box of toothpicks. They come in all sizes.
We use the 1 1/ 2" x 2" size for little stuff. Peel off the upper
Post It when done, and you have a fresh surface to mix the next
batch…

Brian P. Marshall
Stockton Jewelry Arts
Stockton, CA USA
209-477-0550 Workshop/Studio/Classrooms


#10

I leave the toothpick lying in the remaining epoxy, and don’t
dispose of it until the epoxy has thoroughly set - this tells me
when the inlay is ready to be ground down and polished.

Jim Small
Small Wonders Lapidary


#11

Annette,

Better yet; I mix epoxy on a bit of paper with a toothpick, then
throw the lot of it away when I am finished. I am especially fond
of small post-its. Couldn’t be simpler!

Susan Ronan in Coronado, CA, where the air has finally cleared and I
no longer have to wear a 3M mask when out-of-doors! That is one
nasty fire!


#12

Annette. A little trick for mixing epoxy: I do it on a small piece of
properly cleaned glass, and leave the glass with epoxy next to the
glued items. It is then easy to see, when the epoxy has hardened. I
cut pieces of window glass app. 7 x 7 cm (3 x 3 inches) whenever I
get near a broken window and simply discard of them after use. SAves
you the trouble of cleaning tiles etc. Kind regards Niels Lovschal
Bornholm, Denmark


#13

The best surface I’ve found for mixing epoxy (or for using any glue,
for that matter) is silicon. I bought a square pad of silicon (about
6"x6") from a vendor in Tucson that was intended just for this
purpose. Nothing sticks to it. You just let the glue dry, peel it
off (sooner is better than later, I’ve discovered) and it’s ready to
use again. The vendor is Ken Lee of K.H. Lee Supply. The only
contact info I have for him is this phone number: (562) 920-3834.

Beth


#14
The best surface I've found for mixing epoxy (or for using any
glue, for that matter) is silicon.  I bought a square pad of
silicon (about 6"x6") from a vendor in Tucson that was intended
just for this purpose.

You might want to check you local crafts store for a hot glue gun
pad. I remember my wife having one and it sounds very similar to the
same product.

Rick Copeland
Silversmith and Lapidary Artisan
Colorado Springs, Colorado
http://home.covad.net/~rcopeland


#15

I keep a small pile of 3" squares that I’ve cut out of aluminum foil
to mix epoxy. No clean up!