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14k to platinum solder


#1

Are any special thechniques req for making a" 14k to platinum"
solder joint?

Ralph


#2

Hi Ralph, Use 14K hard solder the color of your 14K gold. Don’t
get the platinum any hotter than neccesary. It all works fine.
Good luck. Tom Arnold


#3

Hi Ralph! The only thing to remember in soldering ANY metal to Pt
is to use the solder appropriate to the lesser metal, i.e., don’t
use above 14k hard for a 14k application. Use flux to protect the
gold; you would not use flux on Pt to Pt application. When
bonding Pt to any lesser metal, treat the whole piece as you
would for the lesser metal; any overheating of the gold solder
would eat the Pt and just WRECK the nice polished finish that
you can apply before soldering.


#4
    Are any special thechniques req for making a" 14k to
platinum" solder joint? 

Not really Ralph, just be sure you anneal both pieces first
before you attach them, as Platinum has a different expansion
rate than gold. Use flux and a cadmium free gold solder. This is
important in the long run, as Cadmium will migrate into the Pt
and cause imbrittlement. For additional help call me at Platinum
Guild International USA 949

760-8279Jurgen J. Maerz
Mgr of Tech Edu
JA Certified Master Bench Jeweler


#5

just one more thing make sure you polish the plat. to showroom
finish before soldering to the gold, as plat will take more work
to polish then gold and the gold will be polished a way before
you get the plat. polished . dont wory about the plat.
oxidizingit wont.


#6
 just one more thing  make sure you polish the plat. to
showroom finish before soldering to the gold, as plat will take
more work to polish then gold and the gold will be polished a
way before you get the plat. polished . dont wory about the
plat. oxidizingit wont. 

Those of you having problems polishing platinum including the
difference between the gold and the platinum on two tone pieces,
really should call Gesswein and try their platinum polishing
compounds. These imported compounds are essentially aluminum
oxide abrasives in VERY fine grits. They are hard enough that
they care much less whether the metal is gold or platinum, in
the same way that an emery stick cuts just as well on platinum as
it does on gold. Sure, the platinum polishes a bit slower, but
you’ll find it manageable with these compounds. Of course, the
platinum should always be finished as well as practical first,
but there are times when you don’t have that option. Also proper
prepolishing treatment, such as fine emery and finer rubber
wheels will greatly reduce your problems. The Gesswein compounds
may initially scare you off with their admitedly rather high
prices. But once you try em, you’ll be hooked. The time you
save on polishing your platinum or difficult gold pieces, will
easily enough pay for the compounds…

Peter Rowe


#7

Dear Peter,

I would have to agree about using appropriate Platinum compounds
for polishing. Particularly the orange compound available
through Gesswein. But why do they charge that much any way?
(maybe a question for Elaine Corwin) This compound, produced by
Menzerna in Europe, can be ordered from European suppliers for
significantly less (even considering the air freight) than
Gesswein is getting for it! But then, this brings to mind the
whole question of whats available in Europe, its better quality,
and why we pay so dearly for some of it anyway…
Puzzled, Eben Lenz


#8

I just ordered some tools from Fischer in Germany. The bent ring
quality stamps I just ordered are about $10 each (DM 18) at the
current exchange rate, and very sharp image quality. Postage is
a bit steep, but you still save.

Richard D. Hamilton
USA
Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography
http://www.rick-hamilton.com


#9

through Gesswein. But why do they charge that much any way?

Sorry to be a Buttinski, but I think that they charge that much
because they think it is worth it. Personally I prefer Grey Star
tripoli and green rouge.

Bruce Holmgrain
Marylands first and only JA Certified Senior Bench Jeweler
Email: Manmountaindense@knight-hub.com
http://www.goldwerx.nu


#10
     Particularly the orange compound available through
Gesswein. 

Personally, my favorites are the 700 and 8000 compounds…

   But why do they charge that much any way? 

They aren’t in business to give away freebies are they? They
have to import it. Then, it’s reasonable to assume they put their
normal business markup on their costs of both importing and
buying the stuff. To assume otherwise would be wishful thinking.
While they likely can buy it cheaper than you can import small
amounts, I’d expect their markup to more than make up the
difference. This isn’t greed or overcharging, it’s simply
standard (and necessary) business practice if a company is going
to show a profit and stay in business.

   (maybe a question for Elaine Corwin)  This compound,
produced by Menzerna in Europe, 

somehow, based on a recent article of Elaine’s in AJM magazine,
I thought the compound was Japanese. But maybe I read it wrong.
You woudn’t happen to have an address and ordering info for those
compounds, now, would you? While I fully respect Gesswein’s
right and need to charge what they do (which is no worse than
other importers of european tools and supplies charge), I have
no problem whatsoever with doing end runs around middlemen when I
can do so easily…

Peter Rowe