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YAK Paste solder


#1

G’day; I seem to be the only dissenter on paste solder. I have
tried tubes from 2 sources in NZ and have gone back to paillons.
Firstly I find I don’t get any paste out of the syringe; I press a
bit harder and get a great gob, or still nothing happens except a
little clear liquid. Whether it is old before it gets out here,
(there’s none made in NZ) or the journey ages it (like it did me) I
don’t know. So I applied it to my jump rings with a toothpick. It
didn’t seem to flow as well as proper sterling solder, so I used my
usual flux, when it did work. On using my usual tool for
elongating round rings (a circlip tool) I broke the joint virtually
each time. Which meant that they were no good anyway. Only about 1
in 25 break with ‘proper’ solder. When making sterling chain I
mostly use 0.9mm wire. (I draw it myself) I anneal, then pickle,
rinse in soda solution, wipe with a tissue, then using a drill
holding a mandrel between 2 and 8mm wind the coil. I cut the rings
off using modified little side cutters, clean up the oblique end
with a touch of a little sanding disc, bring the ends touching with
two pair of pliers and hang it on a 1mm dia titanium wire, and flux
it. I have a small dish containing the 1 to 1.5mm squares of
solder (paillons) ready, and I light my torch in my left hand. I
dip the pointed end of a 2mm titanium wire in flux, shake off
excess, then use it to pick up a paillon. I heat it on the wire
until it rolls into a tiny ball and goes bright. I bring the pick
close to the join on the ring, heat it and apply the ball with the
flame heating both ring and pick at the same time, Voila! A good
join. The thin titanium wire doesn’t take much heat away, even when
joining two halves of a necklace chain with the final ring, and of
course nothing will solder to titanium. One point though; I
switch off my bright bench light and use the dimmer room-light to
ensure I can see how hot the ring is and don’t overheat. I use
little home-turned hardwood containers to hold the cut rings of
different sizes, others to hold soldered rings sizes, two joined
rings, four rings, and the growing chains. With everything to
hand it takes only about a minute or less for each ring. For some
strange reason I enjoy making chain; it is restful I suppose. I’d
hate to have to earn a living at it though; but I’d get a lot
thinner. :slight_smile: Cheers

    /\
   / /    John Burgess, Nelson, New Zealand
  / /
 / //\    @John_Burgess2
/ / \ \

/ (___)
(_________)


#2
 G'day;  I seem to be the only dissenter on paste solder. I have
tried tubes from 2 sources in NZ and have gone back to paillons.

I hesitate to put in my two cents worth because I am hardly as
experienced as the majority of jewelers on this list. But I do have
some experience with paste solder and have come to rely on it in
many circumstances. First of all it does indeed sound as if your
paste is very old. This will effect it’s ease of use but not it’s
soldering ability. The tubes I have right now are old but I
stubbornly keep using them. Cheap ya know. :^) Think of the flux as
a vehicle to carry the solder not as a flux, it does not replace
proper fluxing. I also had a hard time in the beginning judging the
amount of solder to use. It’s easy to use too little. This is an
advantage for me as I tend to use too much. I have never had a
problem with strength but then I don’t use it for jump rings, it’s
easier to use a solder pick. Where I find paste the most useful is
on long running joins such as a bezel. Paste is not a cure all but
I love it in the right place. But then again…I could be wrong.
;^) Loveland


#3

Chain making
I am very interested in receiving patterns for both soldered and
non-soldered chains.

In advance I would like to offer this method. The initial
instructor is Jerry Harr, with imput from his students.

Wrap your selected gauge of wire (fine silver preferred over SS
due to tarnish factor) around your chosen dowel size, using your
favorite way to do this. When dowel is wrapped as needed, place
"Scotch" type tape down the length on top of the silver. Using a
Dremel type tool with a fine spring steel cutter in place, VERY
carefully cut straight down the tape (it is ok to draw a line for
guidance.) You should have a clean burr-less cut. Take a fire
brick and place the links across the entire brick with the joint at
1PM. Touch your flux and/or solder/paste solder on each joint and
gently heat the entire area. The fire brick should retain some heat
and the flux should keep the solder (either form) in place. Then
focus your torch along an entire line of links and move on as the
solder flows. This really works and makes a rather tedious task
much less so.

Jerry Harr is a member of the Vista Gem and Mineral Society (Ca.)
and teaches through the Parks and Recreation Department. He will be
a demonstrator at the Palomar Gem and Mineral Society Club Show
April 3-5 in Escondido, Ca. All are welcome.

Teresa Masters


#4

What flux do you use in combination with the paste solder?


#5
  I have never had a     problem with strength but then I
don't use it for jump rings, it's  easier to use a solder
pick. Where I find paste the most useful is  on long running
joins such as a bezel. Paste is not a cure all but    I love
it in the right place. But then again.....I could be wrong.   
;^) Loveland

Hello Loveland: I would agree. Use what works.

I am hardly as experienced as the majority of jewelers on this list.

Don’t sell yourself short. Experience is just time served. Many of
the processes I use today, I learned many years ago. Besides, If
you don’t chime in with advice now and again, you don’t find out
if somebody knows a better way.

Michael Mathews Victoria,Texas USA


#6
 focus your torch along an entire line of links 

Hello…just for my own uncertianty…are you indicating that the
tape remains on the links and on the dowel during the soldering
process…down the line of rings?

Eric
Highlander


#7
     Wrap your selected gauge of wire (fine silver preferred
over SS due to tarnish factor) Touch your flux and/or solder/paste
solder on each joint and gently heat the entire area. The fire
brick should retain some  

Teresa

Sounds like a good idea for the set up but I am curious as to why
you don’t just fuse the links, if you’re using fine silver. It’s
the way I do it. No flux, no solder, no fuss.

Linda
@Red1Eagle
New Jersey USA (sunny & hi 40’s today!)


#8
 What flux do you use in combination with the paste solder? >>

Hmmm, maybe a silly statement, but I thought that the Paste Solder
was IN its own flux. I’ve never used it, and I think your question
is interesting if one actually has to use flux with the stuff.


#9

Sorry, The tape is there to keep the rings from flying all over
while cutting. The tape is removed prior to soldering. Teresa Masters


#10
What flux do you use in combination with the paste solder?

Don’t need any, flux is in the paste. I do use boric acid powder
and denatured alcohol before applying paste.

Nancy


#11
 What flux do you use in combination with the paste solder?<<

None is usually required. The flux is an integral part of the
paste, usually it’s all or part of the vehicle that is mixed with
the metal granuals to make the paste. When using paste I’ve found
the best results when the paste contacts BOT H sides of the joint
before applying heat. If the paste is only applied to 1 side of the
joint, the solder may not flow to the 2nd side. If some of it does
flow to the other side, the joint will be less than completely
soldered due to oxides forming prior to the solder flowing.

Dave


#12
  When using paste I've found the best results when the paste
contacts  BOT H sides of the joint 

Try to do this but it’s not always possible so it would be good
to flux the other side of the joint. - Deb


#13
   Hmmm, maybe a silly statement, but I thought that the Paste
Solder was IN its own flux. 

It is in flux, but sometimes it would be better to put the paste
solder on one piece and flux the piece to which you are
soldering.