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Working area for heavier tasks


#1

Hi,

I’m slowly setting up workspace for myself. I need a working area
for heavier tasks (using disc cutters/ hammering/ anvil/ etc.) Where
can I obtain a suitable table?

Thanks in advance for your help! Jamie


#2

Jamie,

I'm slowly setting up workspace for myself. I need a working area
for heavier tasks (using disc cutters/ hammering/ anvil/ etc.)
Where can I obtain a suitable table? 

Why not build one. I had similar needs and built a heavy duty table
using 4X4’s for legs with a 1.5" thick top made with two.75" pieces
of plywood. I would be happy to send you a drawing off line.

Joel Schwalb
www.schwalbstudio.com


#3

Jamie,

I’m in the process of building a workspace for forging and other
heavy work as I don’t currently have access to a stump, which is
what many jewelers use. The stump is typically lower than a work
bench or table in order to get enough downward force for hammering.
It is also at a height suitable to work at it in a sitting position.
My plans include using six 3"x3" legs on a 3/4" hardwood base, with
my anvil stationed on one side. For the other side, I plan to go to
my local Woodcraft store to find a thick piece of suitable wood for
hammering and forming. I will also mount a vise to this side for
holding stakes, etc.

If anyone has experience building something similar I would be
interested to know if this sounds doable.

Thanks,
Bonnie Cooper


#4

for heavier tasks (using disc cutters/ hammering/ anvil/ etc.) Where
can I obtain a suitable table?

I have a Kennedy workbench next to MY workbench. It has all that
stuff on it. It’s a steel bench with configureable drawers and a 1
1/2" butcher block top. It cost $300 or something as I recall, but
it’s the real thing. They’re readily available - look to machinist’s
supplies (we bought ours in a local hardware store) Enco, Travers,
MSC won’t be cheap but they have EVERYTHING.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#5
I'm in the process of building a workspace for forging and other
heavy work as I don't currently have access to a stump, which is
what many jewelers use. 

You may want to try making a laminate block (butchers block) for
your forging. I haven’t actually made one myself, but have a friend
that cut old hardwood pallets (end grain up) to his specific length (
a friend with a table saw helps), and formed his block using Gorilla
glue and drywall screws as clamps. He loves it, square sides and
bottom makes it very stable, and easy to store. You can assemble it
on site, so no hauling logs, and pallets are free in many places.
Your only cost is the glue, and a few cents worth of screws.

Hope this helps.
Christopher Arnett
www.christopherarnettjewelers.com


#6
but have a friend that cut old hardwood pallets (end grain up) to
his specific length (a friend with a table saw helps), and formed
his block using Gorilla glue and drywall screws as clamps. He loves
it 

If a person were to want to do this: It’s WAY easier, and plenty
strong enough, to use 1 1/2" boards - side grain instead of end
grain. If you want a quality job don’t clamp it. Drill each board in
the same place, countersink the two outer boards to fit, and put
threaded rod through it every 12" or something, depending on the size
of it. Then the two real outer boards go over that, basically a
facade. The problem with doing this isn’t the boards or assembly,
it’s that you really need a planer to finish it down in the end. Been
there, done that: 4’ x 8" picnic table and bar to match…

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com