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Why Acetylene?


#61

I’ve opened a catalog to a unit I’d probaly go with.
Propane-oxygen Little Torch that uses 16.4 oz. Coleman
disposable tanks. Each tank provides up to 12 hrs. running time
with a No. 5 tip (much smaller than the tips you mentioned, but
using oxygen the flame is much hotter).

From the infrequency that I refill tanks (5lb propane and
20# oxygen)- that unit would probably be fine for less than
production soldering- especially on gold. My only concern
would be the regulators- minor fluctuations in pressure can
be frustrating.

Rick Hamilton
Richard D. Hamilton

Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography

http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#62
I am thinking of moving the whole shebang out into one of the

aluminum sheds ( 8 by 10) out in the backyard. My question is- is
this a danger if it gets too hot in there? or should I leave the
gas outside and run a hose thru window?

You won’t have any trouble with propane outside in Alabama. The
heat won’= t bother it. I live in AZ where the temp gets over
100F (it’s a dry heat (bg)) lots of days; I’ve had a 5 gal bbq
tank sitting out in the sun for = 15 years with no problems. Lots
of other folks do to.

I’ve had 3 acetylene, a propane, a butane & oxy tank in my shop
for lots of years without a problem.

Just remember, with any gas, KNOW what you’re doing! The folks
that have exciting times with the various gases probably didn’t
check for leaks, didn’t turn off the gas at the tank when done
using it & in any number of other ways abused something in the
welding/solder system.

All of these gases (and some more exciting) have been used in
industry for

lots of years with very few problems. And when problems arose,
it was usually due to carelessness.

I’ll get off the soap box now.

Dave


#63
    The most difficult soldering that I did was when I made
    white metal (tin) jewelry models for a RI jewelry house. We
    used a natural gas/compressed air torch. The lead solder and
    the tin alloy melted just a few degrees apart- I really
    learned soldering!

I’ve done a little pewter smithing so I know what you mean about
difficult. I used the prestolite and used pewter wire for the
solder. It was interesting.

Marilyn Smith


#64

Is it true that acetylene does not pool around the floor like
propane but disspates in the the air?

DeDe


#65

<< We used a natural gas/compressed air torch. >>

rick, how did this compare to oxy/propane or oxy/acetylene? I
had considered this for glass working, since we have air
compressors already- and I am told oxygen is the biggest expense
for beadmaking- anne


#66

DeDe,

While I am sure there are alot of folks that know more than I
about this subject, I’ll fill you in on my use of acetylene.

I too use a B tank in my basement, when I hook it up the first
thing I do is chain it to my bench then check all the possible
leak sites with the soapy water trick. Previously I used several
different kinds of set ups…but I have found that I have been
able to adjust to acetylene fairly easily, but note that I DO NOT
do fine chain repairs etc…

A friend of mine has been using one in his studio attached to
his home for 40ish years with exactly small accident which
happened early on and he claims taught him some respect.

I recognize there are more ideal safety situations…and
eventually would like to be in one, but for now I’m hoping that
ventilation and extreme paranoia on my part will keep me safe.

Karen
@Karenworks


#67
    Based of these densities acetylene is safer as a fuel from a
    density standpoint because it will tend to mingle more freely
    with air being closer to the density of air. Propane and
    butane which are heavier than air will sink and tend to
    collect in potentially more dangereous concentrations near
    the floor.

in all this propane acetylene discussion nobody has mentioned
methane or LPG which is piped into almost every house i have been
in here in Houston. Mix it with oxy and you have all the gas you
need delivered to your home by good old Entex.(local gas company)
several large manufacturers here in the city use this process.
so if you have LPG or methane already piped into the house save
some money and tap the pipe. Frank


#68

Thanks so much for the input!!! I feel a little better
now!!!


#69

Memphis College of Art uses street gas (largely methane and
other such gasses) and oxygen. Works well. In Memphis, to
legally tap into a gas line requires a master plumber, so I
have stayed away from it. It might be a choice, though. The gas
line runs within three or four feet of my bench, but under the
house. The last (I think) SWEST catalog has a table comparing
various gas/air/oxy combinations. Very informative.

<> Marrin T. Fleet <>
<> MFleet@cc.memphis.edu <>
<> SCT Corp. in adminstration of: <>
<> Admin. Computing Services <>
<> The University of Memphis <>
<> Memphis, TN 38152 <>
<> 901-678-3604 <>


#70

Oh, I think that it could be safely done, with little chance of
an accident. One factor in my extremely conservative approach
is the attitude of my insurance company! For whatever reason,
storing acetylene or propane in the house next to my bench will
greatly increase the cost of insurance. And if they don’t know
about it? Well and good, except in the unlikely event of an
accident, at which time they would cancel, and not pay for any
damage. Too risky on the financial front!

<> Marrin T. Fleet <>
<> MFleet@cc.memphis.edu <>
<> SCT Corp. in adminstration of: <>
<> Admin. Computing Services <>
<> The University of Memphis <>
<> Memphis, TN 38152 <>
<> 901-678-3604 <>


#71

in all this propane acetylene discussion nobody has mentioned
methane

We hear stories about how “toxic” methane is . . . are those
stories inncorrect? Yes, everyone has natural gas, but I’ve never
seen a torch to use with that (at least not in my catalogs . … )


#72
rick, how did this compare to oxy/propane or oxy/acetylene? I
had considered this for glass working, since we have air
compressors already- and I am told oxygen is the biggest
expense for beadmaking- anne 

The class I took for glass bead making suggested MAPP as the
"gas" of choice.


#73

Never tried it with a Prestolite- you need a really soft brushy
flame, and not much heat. We also used a copper soldering iron
that was heated with the torch- usually to fill the mistakes ;<)

Rick
Richard D. Hamilton

Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography

http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#74

Nitrogen N2 = 28 approx. 80% of the gas in air
Oxygen O2 = 32 approx. 20% of the gas in air
Acetylene C2H4 = 28
methane CH4 = 16
propane C3H8 = 44
butane C4H10 = 58
hydrogen H2 = 2

Mike McKim Thank you for posting the above. I’ve always heard
that Acetylene was relatively safer than some of the others . . .
but after reading most notes posted here, I was starting to
wonder. . .


#75

Should be plenty hot enough for glass (2200-2500 degrees F?)-
oxygen is overkill really. I think the torch head was a hoke or
something very similar (this was 25 years ago)- there should be
tips available- they are usually largish cylinders with lots of
little holes in the business end.

Rick
Richard D. Hamilton

Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography

http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#76
   When I hooked it up a few months ago, I waited a few days
before turning the tank key. Finally held my breath and went
for it. Now it's no longer frightening.  I do check for leaks
(no, not with a lit match :-)) but with soapy bubbles on all
connections every time before using the torch.  I would
definitely recommend that.  

I had to laugh when I read the above. It took me two weeks
after I hooked up (checked with soapy bubbles on all connections)
to become daring enough to actually “LIGHT THE TORCH!” Haven’t
had a problem since.


#77

I use a Hoke torch, connected to natural gas and O2. Very clean
and hot enough for most things. I think I got the torch from
Progress Tools in Los Angeles.


#78

Just a qick note on gas leaks: While it is useful to use soapy
water to find a leak, just watch your gauges as you turn off
your tanks to see if you have one. If the gauges hold their
pressure after the tank is turned off, you are leak free!


#79

I use natural gas from my house heating supply, and O2. In most
cases it is hot enough, and with an accessory tip set with my
Hoke, I can get a very fine flame tip. This is set up in my
workshop, which is a walled-off room inside my garage. (attached
to the house) I have an anti-backflow valve on the O2 tank, but
don’t think it is necessary on the natural gas line, because it
supposedly comes in at such low pressure. Does this sound safe
enough? I have been using this setup for about 12 years.

Ruth


#80

For whatever reason, storing acetylene or propane in the house
next to my bench will greatly increase the cost of insurance.>>

well, I finally figured it out. so simple. I will strap the gas
tank to one of those dollys designed for this ( we already have
one) and when not in use, wheel the thing out the back door.
cheap insurance, that…