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When to stop?


#1

I have been in the same boat, sort of, as Verna. I can see the
design in my head but could not execute to the standard I wanted. So
I did exactly what Peter (I think?) recommended-- took classes at
Revere. This added skill and confidence that I could execute the
design to the specifications I wanted. And, I guess, as to hammer
marks vs.no hammer marks, I guess I thought that the mechanical
parts of the design needed to be in fact, in harmony with the whole?
So the execution of the piece, whether “organic” or “industrial” in
style, requires enough skill to set the stone or make the hinge so
that it is in fact part of the design. Is this making any sense?

Mary Barker
@mary_barker1


#2
   . . . I guess I thought that the mechanical parts of the design
needed to be in fact, in harmony with the whole? So the execution
of the piece, whether "organic" or "industrial" in style, requires
enough skill to set the stone or make the hinge so that it is in
fact part of the design. Is this making any sense? >Mary Barker 

Hi Mary;

It makes absolute sense to me. So it follows, one would make
choices in designing a piece so that either one had the technical
abilities to pull it off, or was willing to learn what it takes to
accomplish the design. I see a lot of people design without regards
to the challenges those designs pose to execute them, and then go
looking for “tricks” to get around what was actually a lack of
consideration in the design. Don’t paint yourself into corners.
Thank you for communicating that insight. David L. Huffman


#3

Very well said David. I do not believe many academic courses teach
the finer points of ‘engineering’ along with design. Designers all
too often just design and leave the rest up to the maker. In my
eyes, the beauty is in the engineering…not necessarily in the
design. Cheers, Don


#4

Another Amen!!! So much of the fancy ‘designer’ style pieces that I
see in the repair shop are aesthetically pleasing, but the
engineering stinks. I think that often the originals were better
engineered, and that is lost when the concepts are translated to
’popular priced’ jewelry by large scale manufacturers. But, I have
seen many one-off pieces made by high end designers that wouldn’t
wear well for a day, never mind a lifetime. Yes, jewelry is
ornamental, but shouldn’t we design with at least some practical
engineering in there. Few and far between are those who can create
exclusively for the ‘wear it once then put it away’ evening gown
set. Sorry guys, I guess poor engineering is just another of my pet
peeves. My mother is an artist, but my father is a mechanical
engineer, so I suppose I inherited the best of both. Jim


#5
    Another Amen!!!  . . .I have seen many one-off pieces made by
high end designers that wouldn't wear well for a day, never mind a
lifetime. Jim 

Hi Jim and others; If you’ve ever experienced the system of “price
pointing” that goes on in manufacturing, you know how it happens.
When you nail down the price at the consumer end, the whittling is
done back up the line. Good engineers are the first to get cut
because they’ll tell you ahead of time that you can’t do it. Once
they’re out of the way then manufacturing methods get compromised,
and finally materials are scrimped or sacrificed. Sometimes all you
can afford to make is junk under those circumstances. It’s another
of those “slippery slopes” we’ve all heard about. Integrity is the
first casualty.

David L. Huffman