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What would you like to see in a lecture


#1

So. What would you like to see in a visiting artist, jeweler or
metalsmith’s lecture?

Other than or in addition to process…

Andy


#2

Andy,

I’m thinking of going to MJSA Nov 3 in NY to hear Cindy Edelstein
talk about about new tools and skills. IPAD. CRM. Instagram video.
Social media for PR. The need for a 15 second video to send to
interested clients. Facebook. Penultimate. Photos in the right format
to immediately release. Organization.

Richline Group, new Rio owner, is also speaking.

Best, MA


#3

Just had Katy Cassell, enamelist, come and do a lecture for my Art
Appreciation class and the general public - she was doing a Visiting
Artist Residency at our local state park. She had a Power Point
slide show, that showed how her work had developed, and some of her
inspirations and influences. It included years of work, which really
let my students see how an artist’s body of work grows and changes,
and by discussing the influences and inspirations they could learn
WHY these changes happen. Then she had actual pieces they could
handle, both finished and in process. In addition, since I have a
small portable kiln, she did a brief demonstration of a few enamel
processes, so they actually got to see it go from plain metal to
enameled metal - they loved it!

I would think it would depend on some extent to the intended
audience? But this sort of presentation would suit a wide range of
audiences…

Beth Wicker
Three Cats and a Dog Design Studio
bethwicker.com


#4

Humor.

Also be aware of how often one says 'Uh" or “Um”.

-Jo


#5

I’d like to see an examination of the evolution of jewelry design
through the ages, Andy. With an emphasis on specific artists or
groups of artists that have driven the evolution of design in their
own age, and those that created their own genre with little more than
their own creativity. Was it materials that inspired the ancient
Egyptians, Sumerians, Etruscans and Lalique? Was it their religion,
their environment, their political leaders that motivated them, or
was it just their own vision of what was beautiful? Or did some of
those things only serve to hamper them? I’d drive several hours to
attend that lecture.

Dave Phelps


#6

Hi Andy,

I like to see how they got where they are— that can be as a
progression of old work to new work it can be images of inspirations I
like to gain a better understanding of the artist as a person.

best wishes,
Cindy

Cynthia Eid
Cynthiaeid.com


#7

Pictures of their work


#8
as it materials that inspired the ancient Egyptians, Sumerians,
Etruscans and Lalique? Was it their religion, their environment,
their political leaders that motivated them, or was it just their
own vision of what was beautiful? Or did some of those things only
serve to hamper them? I'd drive several hours to attend that
lecture. 

Yes, that would be terrific. I’ve heard speeches from metalsmith
Kathy Kamal on the history of jewelry – one on gothic and Victorian
jet jewelry and one on French revolutionary jewelry. Wonderful.

You might like the book 7,000 Years of Jewelry. If you combine it
with 30,000 Years of Art, open them both to the same year, you might
see some of the culture and religion there.

In the book, 30,000 Years of Art, which is huge, but affordable, as
I was looking through it, I could see Buddhism spreading outward
from India, through the metalwork.

Orchidian Rebecca Ross Russell, if I remember correctly, wrote a
thesis paper on the meanings of women’s jewelry in India.

Elaine
CreativeTextureTools.com


#9

Dear David, i would like to see a lecture on perservearance and the
ability to evolve. In other words, to take an idea and stick with it
yet changing as the times do.

I evolve for survival, as an older citizen, i can not live off of
Social Security, and have to have State assistance, hence putting me
on the welfare rolls. I am desperate to get off and keep investing
every cent i make back into my shop. The State of Alaska hates me
because i take their rule of not making a profit seriously, and also
can not find a clause that says i can invest my profit back into my
business.


#10

Oh Jo! I’ve found myself counting the number of times someone says
"Um" or Uh" and that completely distracts from the message the
speaker is trying to deliver! Other little repetitive phrases I hear:
“you know”; “and everything”…

All those who lecture need to be aware of any little speech habits
and make every effort to reduce them. The habit is probably a nervous
thing, but if the message is to be heard, the speaker must make the
effort. A little silent pause is a good substitute for “Um”, etc.

Judy in Kansas, who will make some excellent jalepeno poppers from
the abundant harvest yesterday. Yum!


#11

Judy, et all!

I just want to barge in on this particular topic. A little pause is
great, why?

It gives the audience, or person time to digest the little piece of
important I don’t keep nattering ‘on & on’, I prefer to
let my words get into their heads and sit there for a few moments.
Then it’s off to another sentence!

I call it a ‘mini-rest’ for the ears. But a long pause is good for
the soul, it emphasize’s the idea you want to put across at that
moment! The ugly phrase of “um”, “a-ah"or"you know” only tells
me the person is trying to cover up his/her lack of knowledge of the
topic. It’s a “time-filler”. Have fun teaching!

Gerry Lewy…