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Wax goblet


#1

Hi,
as I do some woodturning (in the increasingly rare moments of
spare time), I’d like to give some tips. As wax doesn’t have the
strength of wood along the grain, it would perhaps be a good
idea to turn the cup separately and join it to the stem
afterwards, otherwise the stem is likely to break. You could
make tools yourself from any scrap steel, needn’t even be tool
steel for wax, no need of hardening. Of course, you can use
proper woodturning tools. For wax, without any grain, you can
scrape happily, so tools can be made from rectangular section
blanks, the ends ground to shape as you need (“fingernail” for
example would match the hollow of the bowl). Start roughing out
with narrow tools, finish with a broad one that has nearly the
curve of the bowl’s hollow. I’d start with hollowing the inside,
then turn a chuck from another piece of wax, i.e. kind of a
faceplate with a step onto which you can press the rim of the
bowl. Then turn the outside, taking care not to break through
the wall, you could use templates cut from cardboard. Use low
speeds so the wax will not melt. If you have any questions, I’d
be glad to help if I can (could take some time, however, as I am
very busy, just be patient, please). Markus


#2

Markus,

From your note about turning wax, it sounds as though you have
never used some of the high plastic content, very hard,
burn-outable waxes that are on the market. If this assumption
is correct, do try one of these waxes. High speed is not a
problem as the wax has a very high (360 deg. F) melting temp,
and is made to work with high speed tools. Kendt Collins wax
company used to send out a 3/4" x 5 inch bolt and nut turned out
of this wax to demonstrate what could be done. The bolt threads
felt sharp enough to cut you and the fit was wonderful. It
sands, files, drills, saws, and takes power burrs much like a
very even, fine grained hardwood. It can be turned, carved with
a knife (different than with wood, but it does carve) can be
added to if you goof and can be cast into metal if wished. (Many
casters will not cast these types of waxes((Filo Wax) as it is
very expansive upon heating and it breaks the investment. If a
fresh flask ((2 hours old) is put into a hot ((1000 deg F) oven,
and the moon is right and the barometric pressure is in your
favor and you hold your mouth just right, it casts fine.
Actually it is not this bad but it is more problematical than
other casting waxes, BUT very do-able.) Give it a try, it
may open up whole new areas for you.

My 2 cents worth.

John

John Dach and Cynthia Thomas
Maiden Metals
a div. of True wealth is what you are,
MidLife Crisis Enterprises not what you have.
PO BX 44
Philo, CA 95466
707-895-2635(phone)
707-895-9332 (FAX) new
@John_Cynthia_MidLife


#3

If this type of wax cannot be cast easily, what good is it?
What do you do with it?


#4

Thanks everyone for your help on my proposed wax lathe, goblet
projects, etc. I appreciate your suggetions, and will put many of
them to good use. This site is the BEST! Ruth


#5

If you want to cast a goblet by lost wax method (instead of
raising it) you might try dipping a positive goblet form into
liquid wax and build a skin of wax thick enough to cast.


#6

If you want to cast a goblet by lost wax method (instead of
raising it) you might try dipping a positive goblet form into
liquid wax and build a skin of wax thick enough to cast.


#7

If you want to cast a goblet by lost wax method (instead of
raising it) you might try dipping a positive goblet form into
liquid wax and build a skin of wax thick enough to cast.

Big problem here is that it will be difficult to get the wax
"casting" off/out of the master. Also, the detail on the outside
of the “master” will now be on the inside of the wax. If one
really wanted to cast items from a “master” an RTV mold of teh
master is a good way to go, especially if you are going to make
more than one of them.

I make molds for all sorts of artists for all sorts of uses
(wax, cement, slip, pewter, etc.). Molds are not too difficult
to make nor too expensive (if you value your time!).

John

John Dach and Cynthia Thomas
Maiden Metals
a div. of True wealth is what you are,
MidLife Crisis Enterprises not what you have.
PO BX 44
Philo, CA 95466
707-895-2635(phone)
707-895-9332 (FAX) new
@John_Cynthia_MidLife


#8
 Big problem here is that it will be difficult to get the wax
 "casting" off/out of the master.  Also, the detail on the outside
 of the "master" will now be on the inside of the wax.  If one
 really wanted to cast items from a "master" an RTV mold of teh
 master is a good way to go, especially if you are going to make
 more than one of them.
 I make molds for all sorts of artists for all sorts of uses
 (wax, cement, slip, pewter, etc.).  Molds are not too difficult
 to make nor too expensive (if you value your time!).

I think we were talking about creating a single goblet (perhaps
to be used as a “master”). The form I refered to is to define the
inside surface of the cup. If it is a goblet, I doubt there will
be any detail on the inside. I just now sprayed a drinking glass
with silicone and dipped it into my wax pot. I was able to pull
off a wax cup approx. 2.5 inches high ( all the wax in the pot)
by 3 inches in diameter. The inside surface is almost flawless.
The wall thickness is 1.2mm near the top, 2.5mm at the bottom.
Now I can finish the outside like I wish. Then It could be
molded.