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Using tube shapes


#1

Hi all. I would love some feedback on this one. I have some large
tube shape - no hole - carnelian (13mm diameter, 3.75 cm long) that I
would like to encorporate in a bracelet design. My question is: The
current plan is to make a sterling cap for the ends to attach links
and use epoxy to glue the caps on to the stone. Will the caps hold
this way? Is there a better way? Thanks for your help!!

Stephanie Morton


#2

Hi, Stephanie Regarding your cylinders of carnelian (13mm diameter,
3.75 cm long) that you would like to set— I never like to depend on
glue alone to hold stone to metal. The expansion and contraction rates
are too different and in time will usually result in failure of the
glue. There are really good glues that may do the trick. But a better
answer may be the following proceduRe: 1. Use a separating disc to
carve a small groove in each end of the stone cylinder. I do this all
the way around the cylinder just under the edge of the bezel. Be sure
to wear a dust mask when doing this. 2. When setting the cylinder, I
use glue, but also very gently fold the bezel in so there is
mechanical holding doing most of the job and the glue is only a safety
factor. For large stones or some tongue stone, I solder a small round
wire just inside the bezel so the stone snaps into place when I push
it in. Good luck. Deb Jemmott Enhancements


#3
    The current plan is to make a sterling cap for the ends to
attach links and use epoxy to glue the caps on to the stone.  Will
the caps hold this way? Is there a better way? 

My suggestion is to encircle the presumably cylindrical stone with a
cut using a 1) diamond knife file. 2) a ceramic cut-off stone in a
flexishaft, or 3) a little diamond cut-off saw. You could then make
metal end caps to barely cover the encircling cuts, and burnish the
caps into the cut. This method should hold well, and not degrade the
work with cements, although it really wouldn’t hurt to add a little
epoxy into the caps before inserting the stone and burnishing. –
Cheers now,

John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ